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Cryptography: Crash Course Computer Science #33
 
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Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Allan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park attempted to decrypt messages from Nazi Enigma machines, and this need has only grown as more and more information sensitive tasks are completed on our computers. So today, we’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure. Note: In October of 2017, researchers released a viable hack against WPA2, known as KRACK Attack, which uses AES to ensure secure communication between computers and network routers. The problem isn't with AES, which is provably secure, but with the communication protocol between router and computer. In order to set up secure communication, the computer and router have to agree through what's called a "handshake". If this handshake is interrupted in just the right way, an attacker can cause the handshake to fault to an insecure state and reveal critical information which makes the connection insecure. As is often the case with these situations, the problem is with an implementation, not the secure algorithm itself. Our friends over at Computerphile have a great video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYtvjijATa4 Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 176818 CrashCourse
Cryptography
 
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Google IT Support Professional Certificate Course 6 - IT Security: Defense against the digital dark arts, Module 2 - Cryptology To get certificate subscribe at: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/google-it-support ================= The whole course playlist: Google IT Support Professional Certificate https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWZlfwMPcVKwaFrRXbqObI3U ================= IT Security https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWaEXEpyRf-Im3U8WQ962Y4B ================= https://www.facebook.com/cyberassociation/ https://scsa.ge/en/online-courses/ This six-course certificate, developed exclusively by Google, includes innovative curriculum designed to prepare you for an entry-level role in IT support. A job in IT can mean in-person or remote help desk work, either in a small business or at a global company, like Google. Whether you’ve been tinkering with IT or are completely new to the field, you’ve come to the right place. If you’re looking for a job, upon completion of the certificate, you can share your information with top employers, like Bank of America, Walmart, Sprint, GE Digital, PNC Bank, Infosys, TEKsystems, UPMC, and, of course, Google. Course 6 - IT Security: Defense against the digital dark arts About the Course This course covers a wide variety of IT security concepts, tools, and best practices. It introduces threats and attacks and the many ways they can show up. We’ll give you some background of encryption algorithms and how they’re used to safeguard data. Then, we’ll dive into the three As of information security: Authentication, authorization, and accounting. We’ll also cover network security solutions, ranging from firewalls to Wifi encryption options. The course is rounded out by putting all these elements together into a multi-layered, in-depth security architecture, followed by recommendations on how to integrate a culture of security into your organization or team. At the end of this course, you’ll understand: - how various encryption algorithms and techniques work and their benefits and limitations. - various authentication systems and types. - the difference between authentication and authorization. At the end of this course, you’ll be able to: - evaluate potential risks and recommend ways to reduce risk. - make recommendations on how best to secure a network. - help others to understand security concepts and protect themselves Who is this class for: This program is intended for beginners who are interested in developing the skills necessary to perform entry-level IT support. No pre-requisite knowledge is required. However, if you do have some familiarity with IT, you can skip through any content that you might already know and speed ahead to the graded assessments. Module 2 - Cryptology In the second module of this course, we'll learn about cryptology. We'll explore different types of encryption practices and how they work. We'll show you the most common algorithms used in cryptography and how they've evolved over time. By the end of this module, you'll understand how symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and hashing work; you'll also know how to choose the most appropriate cryptographic method for a scenario you may see in the workplace. Learning Objectives • Understand the how symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and hashing work. • Describe the most common algorithms of cryptography. • Choose the most appropriate cryptographic method given a scenario.
Views: 156 intrigano
Electronic Code Book(ECB) | Algorithm Modes in Cryptography
 
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In this network security video tutorial we will study and understand the working of Electronic Code Block also known as ECB algorithm mode. Electronic Code Block (ECB) - 1. The simplest mode of operation 2. Plain text message is divided into blocks of 64 bits each. 3. Each such block is encrypted independently of the other blocks. 4. For all blocks same key is used for encryption. 5. If a plain text block repeats in the original messages, the corresponding cipher text block will also repeat in the encrypted message. 6. Suitable only for small messages. Complete Network Security / Information Security Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkfggBVUJxY&list=PLIY8eNdw5tW_7-QrsY_n9nC0Xfhs1tLEK Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/ Simple Snippets on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Twitter - https://twitter.com/simplesnippet Simple Snippets Google Plus Page - https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID - [email protected] For More Technology News, Latest Updates and Blog articles visit our Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/
Views: 622 Simple Snippets
Cryptography: The Science of Making and Breaking Codes
 
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There are lots of different ways to encrypt a message, from early, simple ciphers to the famous Enigma machine. But it’s tough to make a code truly unbreakable. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, John Szymakowski, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz, David Campos, and Chris Peters. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: http://www.vectorsite.net/ttcode_04.html#m3 http://www.simonsingh.net/The_Black_Chamber/crackingprinciple.html http://book.itep.ru/depository/crypto/Cryptography_history.pdf http://www.cs.trincoll.edu/~crypto/historical/gronsfeld.html http://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/vpns/history-encryption-730 http://ftp.stmarys-ca.edu/jsauerbe/m10s11/chapter5.pdf http://www.turing.org.uk/scrapbook/ww2.html http://enigma.louisedade.co.uk/howitworks.html http://www.codesandciphers.org.uk/enigma/example1.htm http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/military/how-enigma-works.html http://www.cs.miami.edu/~burt/learning/Csc609.051/notes/02.html
Views: 777666 SciShow
Block Cipher Modes of Operation (CSS441, L06, Y15)
 
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Modes of operation for block ciphers, introducing ECB, CBC and Counter mode. Course material via: http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 20173 Steven Gordon
Advanced Protection for Web-based Attacks
 
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See how AMP for Web goes beyond the basics of web security to protect against the most advanced web related threats.
Views: 941 Cisco
ECB Problem #1
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 1845 Udacity
Cybersecurity: Crash Course Computer Science #31
 
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Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. Check out Computerphile’s wonderful video on how to choose a password! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NjQ9b3pgIg Pre-order our limited edition Crash Course: Computer Science Floppy Disk Coasters here! https://store.dftba.com/products/computer-science-coasters Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 331091 CrashCourse
Covert Channels
 
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Cyber Attack Countermeasures Module 1 Cyber Security Safeguards Learning Objectives • Recognize the three basic types of cyber security safeguards • Describe early cyber security modeling including the reference model • Describe the fundamental roles of the Orange Book and TCB in cyber security • Summarize the basics of the Bell-LaPadula and Biba models for cyber security • Examine covert channels and the disclosure challenges they introduce • Recognize information flow models based on subject-object-action • Review hook-up security and non-composability of disclosure properties
Views: 188 intrigano
What is phishing attack || how to be safe || phishing protection || in telugu || by nani ||
 
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What is phishing attack || how to be safe || email phishing scams || in telugu || by nani || ◆My facebook page:◆ http://www.facebook.com/Nanitechnology.co ◆My playlists:◆ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbr1QHGKa6jk6yoH0oiBJ-g/playlists ◆My all videos :◆ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbr1QHGKa6jk6yoH0oiBJ-g/videos
Views: 407 Nani Technology
The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy
 
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Here's something I wrote a few weeks ago and I've been spreading around, and encouraging others to do so as well. The formatted version I put on my DeviantArt journal is linked to below, and I've provided the raw text as well; feel free to copy it and spread it around anywhere you think it'll do good--especially to politicians. The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy by shanedk on DeviantArt http://shanedk.deviantart.com/journal/The-Ten-Commandments-of-Encryption-Policy-634133886 So many politicians, bureaucrats, and pundits are proposing weakening our crypto to allow searches by law enforcement without understanding the issue, so I thought it'd be good to have a quick reference to explain why this is a bad idea. Feel free to copy this and send to politicians, news reporters, or anyone else you think needs to know this. The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy 1. In "Applied Cryptography" (2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1996), Bruce Schneier wrote: "There are two kinds of cryptography in this world: cryptography that will stop your kid sister from reading your files, and cryptography that will stop major governments from reading your files." Therefore, anything that allows our government to read our messages will automatically put our crypto into the "kid sister" category. 2. Anything that allows government to read your message will also allow hackers to read your message. Cryptography is just math, and math works the same for everybody. It doesn't distinguish between good people and bad, or who has a warrant and who doesn't. 3. When strong crypto is outlawed, only outlaws will have strong crypto. The encryption genie is already out of its mathematical bottle. Weakening our crypto so our governments can read it will only make us vulnerable to hacker groups and terror organizations like ISIS, who will have no hesitation about breaking the law to use strong crypto themselves. 4. "If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to worry about" is a very dangerous mantra. Just ask anyone who's had their identity stolen. 5. When people talk about giving law enforcement authorities access to our data, remember that they're talking about the same law enforcement authorities who illegally tapped Martin Luther King Jr.’s phones. 6. Terror attacks, mass shootings, and mass hackings are all proof that we cannot rely on laws to protect us. We need to protect ourselves with math. Protecting our data is too important to be left to governments. 7. Always remember that lawmakers want solutions that are visible, that they can point to and say, "See? It works." But security solutions that ACTUALLY work are invisible. People go about their lives unaware of the attacks they were protected from. People don't notice the days their house DOESN'T get burgled. 8. Don't be caught up in considering how much security you "need." You won't know how much that is until after the worst happens and it's too late. We need to be able to give ourselves every last bit of security that we can. 9. Before you bring up the founders or the Constitution, remember that they themselves often communicated using ciphers. Thomas Jefferson even invented a wheel cipher for this purpose. 10. We need to consider the consequences of constant observation. Every bit of human progress began as an idea that most people opposed. The last thing we want to do is make people afraid to express those ideas.
Views: 762 Shane Killian
Algorithm Modes & Algorithm Types in Network Security - ECB | CBC | CFC | OFB | CTR
 
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In this network security video tutorial we will study and understand the different types of algorithms and the different modes in which these algorithms work. An algorithm type is basically how the algorithm operates on the plain text to get the cipher text. It can be classified into 2 categories - 1. Stream Ciphers - Stream cipher techniques involves the encryption of plain text one bit at a time and decryption also happens one bit at a time. 2. Block Ciphers - Block cipher techniques involves the encryption of plain text one block(64 bit or some fixed size) at a time and decryption also happens one block at a time. Algorithm modes - An Algorithm mode is a combination of a series of the basic algorithm steps on block cipher and some kind of feedback from the previous step. In general there are 5 different types of algorithm modes in NS- 1. Electronic Code Book (ECB) 2. Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) 3. Cipher Feedback (CFC) 4. Output Feedback (OFB) 5. Counter Mode (CTR) Complete Network Security / Information Security Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkfggBVUJxY&list=PLIY8eNdw5tW_7-QrsY_n9nC0Xfhs1tLEK Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/ Simple Snippets on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Twitter - https://twitter.com/simplesnippet Simple Snippets Google Plus Page - https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID - [email protected] For More Technology News, Latest Updates and Blog articles visit our Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/
Views: 336 Simple Snippets
Hackers & Cyber Attacks: Crash Course Computer Science #32
 
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Today we're going to talk about hackers and their strategies for breaking into computer systems. Now, not all hackers are are malicious cybercriminals intent on stealing your data (these people are known as Black Hats). There are also White Hats who hunt for bugs, close security holes, and perform security evaluations for companies. And there are a lot of different motivations for hackers—sometimes just amusement or curiosity, sometimes for money, and sometimes to promote social or political goals. Regardless, we're not going to teach you how to become a hacker in this episode but we are going to walk you through some of the strategies hackers use to gain access to your devices, so you can be better prepared to keep your data safe. *CORRECTION* AT 7:40 "whatever" should not have a leading ' The correct username field should be: whatever’; DROP TABLE users; Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 189848 CrashCourse
What is Brute Force Attack? How it's done? | [Hindi]
 
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Video Title: What is Brute Force Attack? How it's done? | [Hindi] In this video i will tell you what is brute force attack and how it's done. We will see in detail how it works. we will also discuss what is dictionary attack and how its different from brute force attack. Everything explained in Hindi. Extra info: In cryptography, a brute-force attack consists of an attacker trying many passwords or passphrases with the hope of eventually guessing correctly. The attacker systematically checks all possible passwords and passphrases until the correct one is found. Alternatively, the attacker can attempt to guess the key which is typically created from the password using a key derivation function. This is known as an exhaustive key search. A brute-force attack is a cryptanalytic attack that can, in theory, be used to attempt to decrypt any encrypted data (except for data encrypted in an information-theoretically secure manner). Such an attack might be used when it is not possible to take advantage of other weaknesses in an encryption system (if any exist) that would make the task easier. When password guessing, this method is very fast when used to check all short passwords, but for longer passwords other methods such as the dictionary attack are used because a brute-force search takes too long. Longer passwords, passphrases and keys have more possible values, making them exponentially more difficult to crack than shorter ones. Brute-force attacks can be made less effective by obfuscating the data to be encoded making it more difficult for an attacker to recognize when the code has been cracked or by making the attacker do more work to test each guess. One of the measures of the strength of an encryption system is how long it would theoretically take an attacker to mount a successful brute-force attack against it. Brute-force attacks are an application of brute-force search, the general problem-solving technique of enumerating all candidates and checking each one. ----------------------------------------- Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DesiScientistReal/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DS_Asli
Views: 5983 Desi Scientist
WHAT IS CRYPTOGRAPHY ? DEFINITION?
 
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This video introduce about CRYPTOGRAPHY Definition of cryptography a short video on cryptography .... Blog: http://jacktechs.blogspot.in/ FB Page:- https://www.facebook.com/jacktechs/
Views: 521 Jack Tech
[Hindi] What is Cryptography ? | Kya hai cryptography ? | Explained in simple words
 
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Hello Dosto Aaj hum baat karenge cryptography ke bare me ki ye kya hota hai aur iska itemaal kaise aur kaha hota hai. iska sambandh kisi bhi data ya message ko safely pohchane se hota hai aur uski security badhayi jati hai taaki bich me koi an-adhikarik tarike se usko access na kar paye. aasha karta hoo apko ye video pasand ayegi agar aapko ye video achhi lage to isse like kare aur apne dosto ke sath share kare aur abhi tak aapne mera channel subscribe nahi kia hai to jarur is channel ko subscribe kare. Subscribe to my channel for more videos like this and to support my efforts. Thanks and Love #TechnicalSagar LIKE | COMMENT | SHARE | SUBSCRIBE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For all updates : SUBSCRIBE Us on Technical Sagar : www.youtube.com/technicalsagarindia LIKE us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/technicalsagarindia Follow us on Twitter : http://www.twitter.com/iamasagar
Views: 79663 Technical Sagar
Differential Cryptanalysis: an Introduction for Humans
 
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Keith Makan talks about differential cryptanalysis which is one of the most fundamental attacks ever developed in the history of security. The talk covers a gentle introduction to the idea; shows you how to perform the attack, as well includes some rants about how terrible crypto is in general. For the people who are less interested in crypto, it also includes a discussion about the possible cause of possible future intergalactic war. :-D
Views: 1315 OWASP Cape Town
Bruce Schneier's Amazing Answers for Questions about Security, Privacy and Cryptography at DEF CON
 
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Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a "security guru" by the Economist. He is the author of 12 books, including the New York Times best-seller Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World. Watch this video to see the interesting answers given by Bruce Schneier for many questions asked at DEF CON 23. Bruce Schneier is telling about Computer Security, Hacking, privacy, Cryptography and many other things in an interesting way. I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor) with Creative common licence provided by DEF CON.
INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY IN HINDI
 
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find relevant notes at-https://viden.io/
Views: 56018 LearnEveryone
Bitcoin Q&A: Full node and home network security
 
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Does running a Bitcoin and Lightning node at home attract hackers? Why is security through obscurity not the best strategy? What is some general advice on securing your personal computer and home network? Are there full node starter kits? Could bitcoin nodes be cut off if ISPs blocked port 8333? How do nodes connect to each other? How could you route around censorship? Will Bitcoin evolve into a more stealthy and anonymous protocol? These questions are from the June monthly Patreon session, which took place on June 24th 2018. If you want early-access to talks and a chance to participate in the monthly live Q&As with Andreas, become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/aantonop RELATED: Bitcoin, Lightning, and Streaming Money - https://youtu.be/gF_ZQ_eijPs The Internet of Money: Five Years Later - https://youtu.be/6xIq0FdmsIA The Lightning Network - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPQwGV1aLnTurL4wU_y3jOhBi9rrpsYyi Advanced Bitcoin Scripting, Part 1: Transactions and Multisig - https://youtu.be/8FeAXjkmDcQ Advanced Bitcoin Scripting, Part 2: SegWit, Consensus, and Trustware - https://youtu.be/pQbeBduVQ4I The Lightning Network - https://youtu.be/vPnO9ExJ50A Lightning's security model - https://youtu.be/_GNsT_ufkec Misconceptions about the Lightning Network - https://youtu.be/c4TjfaLgzj4 Eltoo, and the early days of Lightning - https://youtu.be/o6eFZ5aI9N0 Lightning Network scaling - https://youtu.be/4KiWkwo48k0 Lightning Network interoperability - https://youtu.be/1HYMWcJHGXc Lightning Network game theory - https://youtu.be/7if0DuTtozY Atomic swaps - https://youtu.be/fNFBA2UmUmg Running nodes and payment channels - https://youtu.be/ndcfBfE_yoY What is Segregated Witness (SegWit)? - https://youtu.be/dtOjjB4mD8k SegWit and fork research - https://youtu.be/OorLoi01KEE Andreas M. Antonopoulos is a technologist and serial entrepreneur who has become one of the most well-known and respected figures in bitcoin. Follow on Twitter: @aantonop https://twitter.com/aantonop Website: https://antonopoulos.com/ He is the author of two books: “Mastering Bitcoin,” published by O’Reilly Media and considered the best technical guide to bitcoin; “The Internet of Money,” a book about why bitcoin matters. THE INTERNET OF MONEY, v1: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Internet-Money-collection-Andreas-Antonopoulos/dp/1537000454/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 [NEW] THE INTERNET OF MONEY, v2: https://www.amazon.com/Internet-Money-Andreas-M-Antonopoulos/dp/194791006X/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 MASTERING BITCOIN: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mastering-Bitcoin-Unlocking-Digital-Cryptocurrencies/dp/1449374042 [NEW] MASTERING BITCOIN, 2nd Edition: https://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Bitcoin-Programming-Open-Blockchain/dp/1491954388 Translations of MASTERING BITCOIN: https://bitcoinbook.info/translations-of-mastering-bitcoin/ Subscribe to the channel to learn more about Bitcoin & open blockchains! Music: "Unbounded" by Orfan (https://www.facebook.com/Orfan/) Outro Graphics: Phneep (http://www.phneep.com/) Outro Art: Rock Barcellos (http://www.rockincomics.com.br/)
Views: 6635 aantonop
8. Web Security Model
 
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MIT 6.858 Computer Systems Security, Fall 2014 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-858F14 Instructor: James Mickens In this lecture, Professor Mickens introduces the concept of web security, specifically as it relates to client-side applications and web browser security models. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 18443 MIT OpenCourseWare
Cryptography And Network Security-Introduction(1) [Cryptography In Computer Security]
 
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🔥Certified Forex, Binary & Crypto Broker🔥 with Unlimited $1000 Practice Account! + 💲Now Trade & Buying Most Crypto Currency (ETH,BTC,XRP,NEO...) ➡ https://goo.gl/jopXRF THIS VIDEO IS NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE. General Risk Warning: The financial services provided by this website carry a high level of risk and can result in the loss of all your funds. You should never invest money that you cannot afford to lose.................................................................................................................cryptography and network security introduction from book atul kahate Cryptography Cryptography (Algorithm Family) Amity University (Organization) principles of network security principle of network security crash course computer science Encryption and Decryption network security principles principles of cryptography types of security attacks Network Security cryptography tutorials Bruce schneir def con Cryptography basics principal of security bruce schneir answers transpostition cipher what is cryptography bruce schneir speech crytographic attacks what is encryption Bruce schneir talk system security types of services Engineering Mentor Internet security substition cipher securtity attacks Bruce Schneier Encryption security system Crash Course passive attack deffie hellman crypto attacks privacy speech Himanshu Gupta active attack YouTube Editor security guru Cryptanalysis Steven Gordon Lecture vlogbrothers Conventional Cryptosystem TED-Amsterdam computers crashcourse encryption security Hank Green cissp free Fundamental decryption quicktrixx John Green Thammasat education
RSA Algorithm with solved example using extended euclidean algorithm | CSS series #7
 
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Take the Full Course of Cryptography and Network Security What we Provide 1) 20 Videos (Index is given down) + More Update will be Coming Before final exams 2)Hand made Notes with problems for your to practice 3)Strategy to Score Good Marks in Cryptography and Network Scurity To buy the course click https://goo.gl/mpbaK3 if you have any query email us at [email protected] Sample Notes : https://goo.gl/Ze1FpX or Fill the form we will contact you https://goo.gl/forms/2SO5NAhqFnjOiWvi2 Cryptography and System Security Index Lecture 1 Introduction to Cryptography and Security System Lecture 2 Security Goals and Mechanism Lecture 3 Symmetric Cipher Lecture 4 Substitution Cipher Lecture 5 Transposition Cipher Lecture 6 Stream and Block Cipher Lecture 7 Mono Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 8 Poly Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 9 Diffie Hellman Lecture 10 RSA Algorithm with Solved Example Lecture 11 IDEA Algorithm Full Working Lecture 12 SHA-1 Algorithm Full Working Lecture 13 Blowfish Algorithm Full working Lecture 14 DES Algorithm Full Working Lecture 15 Confusion and Diffusion Lecture 16 AES Algorithm Full working Lecture 17 Kerberos Lecture 18 Malicious Software ( Virus and worms ) Lecture 19 DOS and DDOS Attack Lecture 20 Digital Signature Full working Explained More videos Coming Soon.
Views: 209829 Last moment tuitions
Symmetric Key Cryptography VS Asymmetric Key Cryptography | Private vs Public Key Cryptography
 
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Understand the working of Symmetric Key Cryptography and Asymmetric Key Cryptography in detail with working and difference between the 2 types. Symmetric Key Cryptography(Private Key Cryptography) - 1. In symmetric-key cryptography, the same key is used by the sender (for encryption) and the receiver(for decryption). 2. The key is shared. 3. The key is Secret and kept Private between the Sender & Receiver 4. For N users in a network the number of keys required is - N(N-1)/2 Asymmetric Key Cryptography(Public Key Cryptography) 1. In asymmetric-key cryptography, 2 different keys are used. 1 for Encryption & 1 for Decryption. 2. Every communicating party needs just a key pair. 3. One of the two keys is called as Public Key and the other is the Private Key. 4. Private key remains as a secret. Public key is for the general public. 5. Only the corresponding public private key pair and encrypt and decrypt messages and no other key can be used. 6. For N users in a network the number of keys required is - N*2. Complete Network Security / Information Security Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkfggBVUJxY&list=PLIY8eNdw5tW_7-QrsY_n9nC0Xfhs1tLEK Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/ Simple Snippets on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Twitter - https://twitter.com/simplesnippet Simple Snippets Google Plus Page - https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID - [email protected] For More Technology News, Latest Updates and Blog articles visit our Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/
Views: 370 Simple Snippets
types of firewall in cryptographic network security
 
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types of firewall in cryptographic network security
Views: 125 Ky support
Lecture 44   Introduction to Threats to Networks, Wiretapping, Attack Methods by NPTEL IIT MADRAS
 
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Like the video and Subscribe to channel for more updates. Recommended Books: The Tangled Web – A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications http://amzn.to/2yU13u7 The Web Application Hacker's Handbook: Finding and Exploiting Security Flaws, 2ed http://amzn.to/2kfm0Hj Computer Security: Art and Science http://amzn.to/2yaXRGZ Fundamentals of Database System http://amzn.to/2yaS984 Help the channel Grow by buying anything through the above links
Views: 32 KNOWLEDGE TREE
Network Security - Virus
 
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Network Security - Virus watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Shweta, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
Password Cracking - Computerphile
 
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'Beast' cracks billions of passwords a second, Dr Mike Pound demonstrates why you should probably change your passwords... Please note,at one point during the video Mike suggests using SHA512. Please check whatever the recommended process is at the time you view the video. How NOT to Store Passwords: https://youtu.be/8ZtInClXe1Q Password Choice: https://youtu.be/3NjQ9b3pgIg Deep Learning: https://youtu.be/l42lr8AlrHk Cookie Stealing: https://youtu.be/T1QEs3mdJoc http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 1357214 Computerphile
Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) | Algorithm Modes in Cryptography
 
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In this network security video tutorial we will study and understand the working of Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) also known as CBC algorithm mode. Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) - 1. Chaining adds a feedback mechanism to a block cipher 2. The results of the encryption of the previous block are fed back into the encryption of the current block. 3. In the first step; the first block of plain text and a random block of text, called Initialization Vector (IV) is used. 4. The IV has no special meaning it is simply used to make each message unique. 5. The value of IV is generated randomly. Complete Network Security / Information Security Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkfggBVUJxY&list=PLIY8eNdw5tW_7-QrsY_n9nC0Xfhs1tLEK Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/ Simple Snippets on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Twitter - https://twitter.com/simplesnippet Simple Snippets Google Plus Page - https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID - [email protected] For More Technology News, Latest Updates and Blog articles visit our Official Website - https://simplesnippets.tech/
Views: 1005 Simple Snippets
Crypto Defenses for Real-World System Threats - Kenn White - Ann Arbor
 
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Modern encryption techniques provide several important security properties, well known to most practitioners. Or are they? What are in fact the guarantees of, say, HTTPS TLS cipher suites using authenticated encryption, IPSec vs. SSL VPNs, Property Preserving Encryption, or token vaults? We live in an era of embedded Hardware Security Modules that cost less than $1 in volume, and countless options now exist for encrypting streaming network data, files, volumes, and even entire databases. Let's take a deep dive into the edge of developed practice to discuss real-world threat scenarios to public cloud and IoT data, and look closely at how we can address specific technical risks with our current encryption toolkits. Advanced math not required. Bio: Kenneth White is a security researcher whose work focuses on networks and global systems. He is co-director of the Open Crypto Audit Project (OCAP), currently managing a large-scale audit of OpenSSL on behalf of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative. Previously, White was Principal Scientist at Washington DC-based Social & Scientific Systems where he led the engineering team that designed and ran global operations and security for the largest clinical trial network in the world, with research centers in over 100 countries. White co-founded CBX Group which provides security services to major organizations including World Health, UNICEF, Doctors without Borders, the US State Department, and BAO Systems. Together with Matthew Green, White co-founded the TrueCrypt audit project, a community-driven initiative to conduct the first comprehensive cryptanalysis and public security audit of the widely used TrueCrypt encryption software. White holds a Masters from Harvard and is a PhD candidate in neuroscience and cognitive science, with applied research in real-time classification and machine learning. His work on network security and forensics and been cited by media including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Reuters, Wired and Nature. White is a technical reviewer for the Software Engineering Institute, and publishes and speaks frequently on computational modeling, security engineering, and trust. He tweets @kennwhite.
Views: 838 Duo Security
Principles Of Network Security And Cryptography [Cryptography In Computer Security]
 
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🔥Certified Forex, Binary & Crypto Broker🔥 with Unlimited $1000 Practice Account! + 💲Now Trade & Buying Most Crypto Currency (ETH,BTC,XRP,NEO...) ➡ https://goo.gl/jopXRF THIS VIDEO IS NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE. General Risk Warning: The financial services provided by this website carry a high level of risk and can result in the loss of all your funds. You should never invest money that you cannot afford to lose.................................................................................................................cryptography and network security introduction from book atul kahate Cryptography Cryptography (Algorithm Family) Amity University (Organization) principles of network security principle of network security crash course computer science Encryption and Decryption network security principles principles of cryptography types of security attacks Network Security cryptography tutorials Bruce schneir def con Cryptography basics principal of security bruce schneir answers transpostition cipher what is cryptography bruce schneir speech crytographic attacks what is encryption Bruce schneir talk system security types of services Engineering Mentor Internet security substition cipher securtity attacks Bruce Schneier Encryption security system Crash Course passive attack deffie hellman crypto attacks privacy speech Himanshu Gupta active attack YouTube Editor security guru Cryptanalysis Steven Gordon Lecture vlogbrothers Conventional Cryptosystem TED-Amsterdam computers crashcourse encryption security Hank Green cissp free Fundamental decryption quicktrixx John Green Thammasat education
Why Was the WannaCry Attack Such a Big Deal?
 
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On Friday, May 12th, 2017, the ransomware program WannaCry started spreading to computers all over the world at an alarming rate. A couple days later, it was basically completely contained with very little damage done. So what happened? Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin, Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Sultan Alkhulaifi, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Piya Shedden, Charles George ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.cnet.com/news/wannacry-wannacrypt-uiwix-ransomware-everything-you-need-to-know/ http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/05/15/528451534/wannacry-ransomware-what-we-know-monday https://www.cnet.com/news/ransomware-attack-cyberattack-malware/ https://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/what-you-need-know-about-wannacry-ransomware https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831795(v=ws.11).aspx https://www.wired.com/2017/05/accidental-kill-switch-slowed-fridays-massive-ransomware-attack/ https://arstechnica.com/security/2017/05/fearing-shadow-brokers-leak-nsa-reported-critical-flaw-to-microsoft/ http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/16/technology/hospitals-vulnerable-wannacry-ransomware/ https://www.elliptic.co/wannacry/ https://www.ft.com/content/fa5ed73a-37e7-11e7-ac89-b01cc67cfeec http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-39907965 https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/14/15637888/authorities-wannacry-ransomware-attack-spread-150-countries https://www.wired.com/2017/05/wannacry-ransomware-hackers-made-real-amateur-mistakes/
Views: 733722 SciShow
Vigenere CIpher
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 37242 Udacity
Algebraic Attack
 
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A movie about algebraic attacks and immunity.
Views: 213 vobis132
Man in the Middle with Differential Cryptography
 
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Certificate verification problems on my Blackberry and Man in the Middle attacks using Differential Cryptography TLS Protocol in detail http://chimera.labs.oreilly.com/books/1230000000545/ch04.html TLS Protocol in even more detail (Microsoft) http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc783349(v=ws.10).aspx TLS RFC http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5246 TLS Packet Structure (Cisco) http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/security-vpn/secure-socket-layer-ssl/116181-technote-product-00.html Why observing key exchange packets won't get you the shared secret key http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/6290/how-is-it-possible-that-people-observing-an-https-connection-being-established-w
Views: 98 david conner
Sikkerhed: Cryptography, confidentiality
 
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http://cs.au.dk/~rav/academy/ * Motivation * Cryptosystem * Exhaustive key search * OTP * DES * Asymmetric crypto * Perspektiver
Views: 105 thatmartolguy
Taylor Daniels - Differential Properties of the H F E  Cryptosystem
 
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Taylor Daniels of the University of Louisville presented a talk titled: Differential properties of the H F E cryptosystem at the 2014 PQCrypto conference in October, 2014. Abstract: Multivariate Public Key Cryptography (MPKC) has been put forth as a possible post-quantum family of cryptographic schemes. These schemes lack provable security in the reduction theoretic sense, and so their security against yet undiscovered attacks remains uncertain. The effectiveness of differential attacks on various field-based systems has prompted the investigation of differential properties of multivariate schemes to determine the extent to which they are secure from differential adversaries. Due to its role as a basis for both encryption and signature schemes we contribute to this investigation focusing on the H F E cryptosystem. We derive the differential symmetric and invariant structure of the H F E central map and that of H F E- and provide a collection of parameter sets which make these H F E systems provably secure against a differential symmetric or differential invariant attack. PQCrypto 2014 Book: http://www.springer.com/computer/security+and+cryptology/book/978-3-319-11658-7 Workshop: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
Authors Speak: Debashis Ganguly - Network and Application Security
 
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http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/... Watch Debashis Ganguly, author of Network and Application Security: Fundamentals and Practices, speak about the key highlights of his book. Table of Contents Network Security— Fundamentals and Practices Network Security Fundamentals Security Triangle (Three Fundamental Objectives of Network Security)—Confidentiality; Integrity; Availability Security Threats—Classification of Network Threats; Confidentiality Attack; Integrity Attack; Availability Attack; Understanding Security Measures Cryptography and Network Security Confidentiality with Symmetric Key Cryptography—Data Encryption Standard; Triple DES; Advanced Encryption Standard; Key Distribution and Confidentiality Public Key Cryptography and Message Authentication—Overview; RSA Public-Key Encryption Algorithm; Diffie- Hellman Key Exchange; Elliptic Curve Architecture and Cryptography; Key Management System-level Security Firewall—Design Goals behind Firewall; Security Controls in Firewall; Design Limitations of Firewall; Firewall Types; Firewall Configuration Intrusion Detection and Intrusion Prevention Systems—Overview; Intrusion Detection Systems; Intrusion Prevention System Applications for Network Security Kerberos—an Authentication Protocol—Overview; Implementation Mechanism; Analysis X.509 Authentication Service Electronic Mail Security—Overview; Pretty Good Privacy as a Solution to E-mail Security IP Security—Overview; Understanding the IPSec Architecture; IPSec Implementation; Security Association; Authentication Header; Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP); IPSec Operation Modes; Key Management Web Security—Overview; Web Security Threats; Overview of Security Threat Modelling and General Countermeasures; Secure Socket Layer and Transport Layer Security Application Security—Fundamentals and Practices Application Level Attacks Occurrences Consequences Attack Types SQL Injection—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Cross Site Scripting (XSS)—Overview; Consequences; Remediation XML-related Attacks—XML Entity Attacks; XML Injection; XPATH Injection; Remediation Log Injection—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Path Manipulation—Overview; Consequences; Remediation HTTP Response Splitting—Overview; Consequences; Remediation LDAP Injection—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Command Injection—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Buffer Overflow—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF)—Overview; Consequences; Remediation Practical Software Security—ASP.Net and Java ASP.Net Security Guidelines—Overview; Code Access Security (CAS); Windows CardSpace; MachineKey Configuration; Authentication in .Net; Restricting Configuration Override Java Security Guidelines—Java Security Model; Specifying Security Constraints Securing Some Application—Specific Networks Securing Storage Area Networks—Overview; Purpose behind SAN; SAN Design Components; SAN Security Issues; Security Measures for SAN Securing VOIP-enabled Networks—Overview; Why VoIP?; VoIP Design Components; VoIP Security Issues; Security Measures for VoIP
Enhanced Security with Cryptography & Steganography
 
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The first recorded use of the term was in 1499 by Johannes Trithemius in his Steganographia, a treatise on cryptography and steganography, disguised as a book on magic.
How Hackers Really Crack Your Passwords
 
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How do computer hackers figure out our passwords? Learn about the techniques they use to crack the codes, and what systems protect us. Building Digital Labyrinths To Hide Your Password - https://youtu.be/KFPkmhcSlo4 Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: Here's How to Stop Russian Cyber-Hacking http://www.seeker.com/heres-how-to-stop-russian-cyber-hacking-2149775375.html “In October, malware embedded in residential internet routers and DVRs helped orchestrate a large-scale distributed denial of service (DDOS) attack on the East Coast that shut down Amazon, Netflix, Twitter and other major websites. The following month, a ransomware hack shut down San Francisco's public transit ticketing system for a few days after Thanksgiving.” 7 sneak attacks used by today's most devious hackers http://www.infoworld.com/article/2610239/malware/7-sneak-attacks-used-by-today-s-most-devious-hackers.html “Millions of pieces of malware and thousands of malicious hacker gangs roam today's online world preying on easy dupes. Reusing the same tactics that have worked for years, if not decades, they do nothing new or interesting in exploiting our laziness, lapses in judgment, or plain idiocy.” How Your Passwords Are Stored on the Internet (and When Your Password Strength Doesn't Matter) http://lifehacker.com/5919918/how-your-passwords-are-stored-on-the-internet-and-when-your-password-strength-doesnt-matter “There are a number of ways a site can store your password, and some are considerably more secure than others. Here’s a quick rundown of the most popular methods, and what they mean for the security of your data.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI
Views: 2751687 Seeker
Letter Frequency of Ciphers
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 5813 Udacity
cnschapter1
 
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cryptography and network security chapter 1 Introduction to CNS presented by V.S. Sriram Panjagala Lecturer in MCA Dept. KBN College
Views: 38 sriram panjagala
💥 Angular Security MasterClass  - New Course
 
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This video is part of the Angular Security MasterClass - Web Security Fundamentals Course - https://angular-university.io/course/angular-security-course Course Overview We will start at the beginning: we will see the proper way of doing User Management and Sign Up: we will learn how to store passwords in a database, and we will introduce cryptographic hashes in an approachable way. Once we have the Sign-Up functionality in place, we will implement Login and understand the need for a temporary identity token. Our first implementation will be stateful login, where the token is kept at the server level. And at this point we could think we have authentication in place, but we decide to prepare our application for scalability, so we decide to try a JWT (JSON Web Tokens) based approach, because we know that this is what services like Firebase and Auth0 use. We will use a couple of Auth0 packages to quickly refactor our Login to be JWT based, and learn the advantages of using JWT, and some potential disadvantages as well. And with this in place, we could think that we had a solid security solution. Its at this point that we will realize that this application is not secure at all!! We will put on our Black Hat, and we will conduct step-by-step an XSS script injection attack and we will steal the identity of another user and send it to an attack server. We decide to first protect our authentication token from theft, and then deal with XSS injection attack later. We try to move the JWT to Cookie storage, only to realize that it made us vulnerable to another attack: CSRF request forgery! We will proceed to further attack the application, and take the time to really understand the attack. At this point feeling more confident with the security of the application, we have decided to tackle the original XSS vulnerability and see how Angular provides built-in defenses for that, and when to bypass those defenses and why. With these protections in place, we will realize with some shock that our application, despite all these built-in defenses is still vulnerable!! We will realize at this stage a huge design vulnerability of the application that was there from the beginning, and fix it. We will learn that some of the best security defenses for our application is good design. We will then recommend a couple of practical ways to do authentication in a project: via a third-party JWT-based service like Auth0 if doing a public internet project with alternative social login, or a pre-authentication based solution if doing an enterprise application that runs behind a firewall. We will then cover how to do UI-level role-based functionality in Angular using the Angular Router, and a custom directive for showing or hiding certain parts of the UI depending on the role of the user. We will learn why the Router cannot enforce actual security. We will also talk about server-side Authorization, and we will implement a commonly needed security-related Admin Level functionality: The Login As User service, that allows an admin to login as any user, to investigate a problem report. We can see why we would need to secure this functionality! At the end of all these vulnerabilities and security fixes, we will have a well secured application and we will have learned a ton of security-related concepts along the way in a fun and practical way! What Will you Learn In this Course? With this course, you will have a rock-solid foundation on Web Application Security Fundamentals, and you will have gained the practical experience of applying those concepts by defending an application from a series of security attacks. You will have done so by actually performing the attacks while in Black Hat mode! You will have learned these concepts in the context of an Angular/Node application, but these concepts are applicable to any other technology stack. You will learn what built-in mechanisms does Angular provide to defend against security problems, and what vulnerabilities it does NOT defend against and why. You will be familiar with best practices for password storage, custom authentication service design and implementation, you will know the essentials about cryptographic hashes, be familiar with JWT and several commonly used open source Auth0 packages. You will be familiar with the following security vulnerabilities: Dictionary attacks, Cross-site Scripting or XSS attacks, identity token highjacking techniques, the browser same-origin policy, how to combine cookies with JWTs and why, Cross-Site Request Forgery or CSRF, common design vulnerabilities, and more. For more videos tutorials on Angular, check the Angular University website - https://angular-university.io Follow us: Twitter - https://twitter.com/AngularUniv Google+ - https://plus.google.com/u/1/113731658724752465218 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/angular.university Check out the PDF E-Books available at the Angular University - https://angular-university.io/my-ebooks
Views: 8302 Angular University
What Is Digital Signature In Cryptography?
 
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In the united states and certain other countries. Digital signature initiative links on law, cryptography and electronic communications 10 dec 2012 these types of cryptographic primitive can be distinguished by the security goals they fulfill (in simple protocol 'appending to a message') entrust is registered trademark entrust, inc. Bitcoin digital signatures (video) microsoft docs. Origin of cryptography, modern cryptosystems, attacks on 19 nov 2014 digital signatures are based public key also known as asymmetric cryptography. Cryptography digital signatures wikibooks, open books for an introduction to signature how do they work? Cgi. How do digital signatures work? Youtube. What is digital signature? Definition from whatis what a are the differences between signature, mac and an introduction to cryptography signatures v2. Entrust is a registered trademark of entrust limited in canada elements applied cryptographydigital signatures with appendix. Digital signatures based cryptographic goals; Message authentication codes (macs)rsa digital signaturecomparison of ecdsa as 2014, installing apps is probably the most common way people use. Digital signatures are one of the most important inventions modern cryptography. Using a public key algorithm such as rsa, digital signature is mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of signatures are standard element most cryptographic protocol suites, and commonly used software distribution, financial transactions, make sure documents you send electronically authentic. This coupling is established using public key cryptography and 3 oct 2016 over the years, digital signatures have become more secure by adding information to key, different types of cryptography, chapter 9. The problem is how can a user sign What digital signature? Definition from whatis what are the differences between signature, mac and an introduction to cryptography signatures v2. Keys are used to encrypt information. Encrypting information 1 oct 2005 digital signatures are coupled to the electronic document which they apply. Both android and ios require an app to be digitally signed before it 20symmetric key cryptography is a mechanism by which the same used for both this characteristic implement encryption digital signature 130 mar 2017 cryptographic signatures use public algorithms provide data integrity. What is a digital signature? . Chapter 09 digital signatures fi muni. Digital signatures with message recovery. Understanding digital certificates technet microsoft. Learn about digital signatures and other authentication methods. Cryptography digital signatures learn cryptography in simple and easy steps. Crash c
Views: 21 Hadassah Hartman
Side Channel Analysis of Cryptographic Implementations
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 5690 nptelhrd
Block Cipher Modes of Operation | CTR mode | Mode of operation of block cipher | Part 5 | Hindi Urdu
 
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#askfaizan | #syedfaizanahmad | #counter Block Cipher Modes of Operation | OFB mode https://youtu.be/F2RwmXwrdV8 Block Cipher Modes of Operation | CFB mode https://youtu.be/yF_iA7Rv7k4 Block Cipher Modes of Operation | CBC mode | Part 2 https://youtu.be/Q7LKmASkVSU Block Cipher Modes of Operation | ECB mode | Part 1 https://youtu.be/mkY5mNSnuko Hill Cipher | Complete Algorithm with Example https://youtu.be/B0Q7w7Fd7ms Playfair Substitution Cipher https://youtu.be/w_xr7pj-O6c Monoalphabetic Substitution Cipher https://youtu.be/Hw1T7GOnVW0 Caesar Cipher | Caesar Substitution Cipher https://youtu.be/2N9GlhysYJw PlayList : Cryptography and Network Security : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhwpdymnbXz7hvvqhqjIIG4tEdhAgQqll Block cipher processes the data blocks of fixed size If size of message is larger than block size. Then, the message is divided into a series of sequential message blocks. Multiple blocks of plaintext are encrypted using the same key, security issues arise. To apply a block cipher in a variety of applications, five modes of operation have been defined by NIST 1. Electronic Code Book Mode 2. Cipher Block Chaining Mode 3. Output Feedback Mode 4. Cipher Feedback Mode 5. Counter Mode The simplest mode is the electronic codebook (ECB) mode Plaintext is handled one block at a time Each block of plaintext is encrypted using the same key The ECB mode is deterministic If plaintext block P1, P2,…, Pm are encrypted twice under the same key, the output ciphertext blocks will be the same. CBC is technique in which the same plaintext block, if repeated, produces different ciphertext blocks Each plaintext block is XORed with the ciphertext block that was previously produced To produce the first block of ciphertext, an initialization vector (IV) is XORed with the first block of plaintext For decryption, IV data is XORed with first ciphertext block decrypted. CFB is similar to CBC, it also make use of Initialization Vector. In CFB, plaintext (b bits) is divided into segments of s bits. Process s bits at a time. Common value of s is 8 bits. Cipher text block is encrypted and the output is XOR-ed with the current Plain text block to create the current Cipher text block. Each ciphertext block gets ‘fed back’ into the encryption process in order to encrypt the next plaintext block. The output feedback (OFB) mode is similar in structure to that of CFB. In CFB, the ciphertext unit is fed back to the shift register, In OFB, The output of the encryption function is fed back to the shift register. It remains localized to one single block, Affecting one plaintext block affects one ciphertext block only Complementing a bit in the ciphertext complements a bit in the plaintext. Like OFB, Counter mode turns a block cipher into a stream cipher It generates the next keystream block by encrypting successive values of a “counter”. A counter equal to the plaintext block size. The counter is initialized to some value and then incremented by 1 for each subsequent block.
Views: 83 Ask Faizan

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