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Protest march against seabed mining mobilises
 
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A protest march against seabed mining was mobilised at Castlecliff Beach Whanganui today. The Māori Party, environmental groups, the community and iwi all united to support efforts to stop seabed mining taking place off the coast of South Taranaki. Protest claim the mining activity puts the delicate marine ecosystem at risk. The South Taranaki Bight project approved by the EPA proposes to excavate up to 50 million tonnes of sand each year.
Views: 226 Te Karere TVNZ
Te Kāhui o Rauru to appeal seabed mining in High Court
 
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West Coast Taranaki has been the interest of mining companies for decades. But local iwi Ngaa Rauru is making a final stand to stop mining along their coastline. Iwi representative group , Te Kāhui o Rauru, will appear in the Wellington High Court to appeal the Environmental Protection Authority's decision last year allowing Trans Tasman Resources Ltd to mine the Taranaki seabed. The mining operation involves the excavation of 50 million tonnes of seabed per year for 35 years over an area of 65 square kilometres, down to 11 metres deep. CEO of Te Kāhui o Rauru, Anne-Marie Broughton, says, "We want a moratorium on seabed mining because there is just too many unknowns about this operation". Broughton says the carnage and impacts will be immense. "The damage to the environment ranges from the very tinniest of ocean creatures to the largest. So if we think about the very tinniest, like the plankton and the krill, in our environment. they actually feed the food chain right up to the largest creatures in our marine life like the Blue Whale." Despite the governments announcement to end offshore oil exploration in New Zealand, concerns for Taranaki continue. Mike Smith of Green Peace says, ""It's certainly not fair on Taranaki who continue to have their lands fracked, their health put at risk to see their lands desecrated." National Party MP Todd Muller told Te Kāea the announcement is a step backwards especially for Taranaki. He says, "You watch, there will be a retrenchment in that industry and as some media have already reported this is the long-term death of Taranaki. It's unacceptable when the opportunity is there for New Zealand to participate," But Ngaa Rauru iwi says the environmental impacts outweighs the employment opportunities. Ngaa Rauru Kiitahi will join alongside other appeal parties from tomorrow. Including representatives of the Taranaki-Whanganui Conservation Board, Te Ohu Kaimoana and Ngaati Ruanui.
Views: 5 MAORI TELEVISION
Ngāti Ruanui present petition calling for moratorium on seabed mining
 
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A large group from Ngāti Ruanui arrived at Parliament today to present an anti-mining petition. The South Taranaki iwi and other interest groups handed over the 5000-signature petition calling for a moratorium on seabed mining. It comes as trans-Tasman resources have re-applied for a marine licence to mine the seabed in the South Taranaki Bight.
Views: 316 Te Karere TVNZ
KASM & S4C - COASTAL JOURNEY - PT 1
 
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In support of KASM (Kiwis Against Seabed Mining), pro surfer & activist David Rastovich, intends to paddle 350km from Taranaki to Piha west of Auckland, New Zealand over two-weeks beginning Nov16th to draw awareness to issues to do with proposed seabed mining. Rastovich, a co-founder of global group "Surfers for Cetaceans" (S4C), will unite with KASM advocates to engage local communities, educate and inspire others to action throughout the epic journey. to help visit: www.kasm.org.nz www.s4cglobal.org Threats: - The entire west coast from Whanganui to Cape Reinga is under either a prospecting or exploration permit to mine iron sands from the seafloor. - Large scale seabed mining, as is proposed, will leave massive oceanic dead zones, could ruin fisheries, affect surf breaks, exacerbate existing erosion problems, change beaches and reintroduce toxins which are currently stabilized in the sea floor. - Foreign owned mining companies are looking to extract billions of tonnes of iron sands for export to Asia and pay just 1-5% of the value of the resource in royalties to the NZ Govt. - Very few jobs would be created for coastal residents as operations are entirely water based. - Much of the permitted area is a direct overlay of the only habitat for the critically endangered Maui's Dolphin. With just 55 dolphins remaining, seabed mining would make extinction of the species a certainty.
DAVID RASTOVICH_KASM & S4C COASTAL JOURNEY by http://www.NZGreen.tv
 
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To help visit: www.kasm.org.nz www.s4cglobal.org In support of KASM (Kiwis Against Seabed Mining), pro surfer & activist David Rastovich, intends to paddle 350km from Taranaki to Piha west of Auckland, New Zealand over two-weeks beginning Nov16th to draw awareness to issues to do with proposed seabed mining. Rastovich, a co-founder of global group "Surfers for Cetaceans" (S4C), will unite with KASM advocates to engage local communities, educate and inspire others to action throughout the epic journey. Threats: - The entire west coast from Whanganui to Cape Reinga is under either a prospecting or exploration permit to mine iron sands from the seafloor. - Large scale seabed mining, as is proposed, will leave massive oceanic dead zones, could ruin fisheries, affect surf breaks, exacerbate existing erosion problems, change beaches and reintroduce toxins which are currently stabilized in the sea floor. - Foreign owned mining companies are looking to extract billions of tonnes of iron sands for export to Asia and pay just 1-5% of the value of the resource in royalties to the NZ Govt. - Very few jobs would be created for coastal residents as operations are entirely water based. - Much of the permitted area is a direct overlay of the only habitat for the critically endangered Maui's Dolphin. With just 55 dolphins remaining, seabed mining would make extinction of the species a certainty. MUSIC: facebook.com/almightygrind Track: See It Through facebook.com/littlebushman Track: Nature Of Man
Views: 302 NZGREENROOM3
Rarest dolphins in the World. MAUIS, David Rastovich encounter West Coast NZ  http://www.NZGreen.tv
 
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Professional surfer and Activist, David Rastovich had a rare encounter with a small pod of the Maui's dolphin off of West Coast of NZ. This video includes some of the highlights from the 40min encounter when they escorted him up the coast North of Port Waikato to the Manakau Haubour. TV3 News: http://www.3news.co.nz/Paddleboarder-raises-awareness-on-seabed-mining/tabid/1160/articleID/278834/Default.aspx PART 1 https://vimeo.com/53764651 PART 2 https://vimeo.com/53989893 PART 3 https://vimeo.com/54278583 To help visit: www.kasm.org.nz www.s4cglobal.org In support of KASM (Kiwis Against Seabed Mining), pro surfer & activist David Rastovich, paddled 350km from Taranaki to Piha west of Auckland, New Zealand over two-weeks beginning Nov16th to draw awareness to issues to do with proposed seabed mining. Rastovich, a co-founder of global group "Surfers for Cetaceans" (S4C), will unite with KASM advocates to engage local communities, educate and inspire others to action throughout the epic journey. Threats: - The entire west coast from Whanganui to Cape Reinga is under either a prospecting or exploration permit to mine iron sands from the seafloor. - Large scale seabed mining, as is proposed, will leave massive oceanic dead zones, could ruin fisheries, affect surf breaks, exacerbate existing erosion problems, change beaches and reintroduce toxins which are currently stabilized in the sea floor. - Foreign owned mining companies are looking to extract billions of tonnes of iron sands for export to Asia and pay just 1-5% of the value of the resource in royalties to the NZ Govt. - Very few jobs would be created for coastal residents as operations are entirely water based. - Much of the permitted area is a direct overlay of the only habitat for the critically endangered Maui's Dolphin. With just 55 dolphins remaining, seabed mining would make extinction of the species a certainty. [web] www.nzgreen.tv [facebook] facebook/nzgreen.tv
Views: 1018 NZGREENROOM3
Maunga Taranaki - a Film by Paul Moss aka  Vj Moza
 
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Maunga Taranaki Paul Moss Vj Moza paulmoss paulmossco moza mozasaur http://www.paulmoss.co http://www.moza.nz
Views: 72 Paul Moss
Rare images of blue whale feeding behavior
 
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Oregon State scientists captured some rare blue whale feeding behavior from a research drone. Whales are the largest creatures on earth, and they get their energy by consuming some of the smallest creatures in the sea. This video shows how they make choices about what's worth eating. ———————————— We do social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/osubeavers Twitter: https://twitter.com/oregonstate Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oregonstate Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/oregonstate LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/school/165337/
Views: 1402047 Oregon State University
Day 10: Nautilus Minerals | Duke University | UPNG Marine Science Short Course
 
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Daily thoughts on deep seabed mining in Oceania as Nautilus Minerals begins its experimental mining programs in the Pacific Ocean Region.
Views: 39 Salesi Kauvakahiva
New Zealand
 
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New Zealand (/njuːˈziːlənd/; Māori: Aotearoa [aɔˈtɛaɾɔa]) is an Oceanian island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses -- that of the North Island, or Te Ika-a-Māui, and the South Island, or Te Waipounamu -- and numerous smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long isolation, New Zealand developed a distinctive biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland. Polynesians settled New Zealand in 1250--1300 CE and developed a distinctive Māori culture. Abel Tasman, a Dutch explorer, was the first European to sight New Zealand in 1642 CE. In 1840, the British Crown and Māori signed the Treaty of Waitangi, making New Zealand a British colony. Today, the majority of New Zealand's population of 4.5 million is of European descent; the indigenous Māori are the largest minority, followed by Asians and Pacific Islanders. Reflecting this, New Zealand's culture is mainly derived from Māori and early British settlers, with recent broadening arising from increased immigration. The official languages are English, Māori and New Zealand Sign Language, with English predominant. The country's economy was historically dominated by the export of wool, but exports of dairy products, meat, and wine, along with tourism, are more significant today. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 196 Audiopedia