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A New Giant Problem for the Economy
 
01:01:51
Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest videos ► https://www.sbry.co/suBiH Episode 01 - A New Giant Problem for the Economy Buck Sexton and Porter Stansberry discuss historical stock returns, the economics of AMZN and NFLX, and today's growing consumer credit crisis in student debt, auto loans, and agriculture. Porter gives you three reasons why the next bubble could be bigger than anyone thinks. Be sure to click here to never miss an episode ↓ SPOTIFY ► https://www.sbry.co/ufnNP GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/lkwhp ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/7OQ79 SOUNDCLOUD ► https://www.sbry.co/jHn5h STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/tEkL5 Check out NewsWire’s Investors MarketCast ↓ GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/dzzKq APPLE ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/GoCV0 STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/s86p1 ———————————— Follow us on Twitter ► https://www.sbry.co/p11ih Join our Facebook Community ► https://www.sbry.co/fMckK Check out our website ► https://www.sbry.co/wUAye Check out Stansberry NewsWire ►https://www.sbry.co/IhNeW Check out Health and Wealth Bulletin ► https://www.sbry.co/iHRmD Check out Extreme Value ► https://www.sbry.co/EvIiH ————————————
Predictive analytics
 
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Predictive analytics encompasses a variety of statistical techniques from modeling, machine learning, and data mining that analyze current and historical facts to make predictions about future, or otherwise unknown, events. In business, predictive models exploit patterns found in historical and transactional data to identify risks and opportunities. Models capture relationships among many factors to allow assessment of risk or potential associated with a particular set of conditions, guiding decision making for candidate transactions. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 117 Audiopedia
Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film
 
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Racism in the United States has been a major issue since the colonial era and the slave era. Legally sanctioned racism imposed a heavy burden on Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans (particularly Anglo Americans) were privileged by law in matters of literacy, immigration, voting rights, citizenship, land acquisition, and criminal procedure over periods of time extending from the 17th century to the 1960s. Many non-Protestant European immigrant groups, particularly American Jews, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, as well as other immigrants from elsewhere, suffered xenophobic exclusion and other forms of discrimination in American society. Major racially structured institutions included slavery, Indian Wars, Native American reservations, segregation, residential schools (for Native Americans), and internment camps. Formal racial discrimination was largely banned in the mid-20th century, and came to be perceived as socially unacceptable and/or morally repugnant as well, yet racial politics remain a major phenomenon. Historical racism continues to be reflected in socio-economic inequality. Racial stratification continues to occur in employment, housing, education, lending, and government. The 20th century saw a hardening of institutionalized racism and legal discrimination against citizens of African descent in the United States. Although technically able to vote, poll taxes, acts of terror (often perpetuated by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in the Reconstruction South), and discriminatory laws such as grandfather clauses kept black Americans disenfranchised particularly in the South but also nationwide following the Hayes election at the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In response to de jure racism, protest and lobbyist groups emerged, most notably, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1909. This time period is sometimes referred to as the nadir of American race relations because racism in the United States was worse during this time than at any period before or since. Segregation, racial discrimination, and expressions of white supremacy all increased. So did anti-black violence, including lynchings and race riots. In addition, racism which had been viewed primarily as a problem in the Southern states, burst onto the national consciousness following the Great Migration, the relocation of millions of African Americans from their roots in the Southern states to the industrial centers of the North after World War I, particularly in cities such as Boston, Chicago, and New York (Harlem). In northern cities, racial tensions exploded, most violently in Chicago, and lynchings--mob-directed hangings, usually racially motivated—increased dramatically in the 1920s. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with W. E. B. Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism America's "worst disease." The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. They mandated "separate but equal" status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were almost always inferior to those provided to white Americans. The most important laws required that public schools, public places and public transportation, like trains and buses, have separate facilities for whites and blacks. (These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800-66 Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans.) State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act; none were in effect at the end of the 1960s. Segregation continued even after the demise of the Jim Crow laws. Data on house prices and attitudes toward integration from suggest that in the mid-20th century, segregation was a product of collective actions taken by whites to exclude blacks from their neighborhoods. Segregation also took the form of redlining, the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs, access to health care, or even supermarkets to residents in certain, often racially determined, areas. Although in the United States informal discrimination and segregation have always existed, the practice called "redlining" began with the National Housing Act of 1934, which established the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_America
Views: 533000 Way Back
Why They Watch You
 
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Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest videos ► https://www.sbry.co/suBiH Episode 42 – Why They Watch You Buck is joined by guest co-host PJ O’Rourke for an American Consequences takeover of the Stansberry Investor Hour. PJ is the rabble rousing best-selling author of titles like Eat the Rich, Give War a Chance, and How the Hell Did This Happen? Buck and PJ discuss Rex Tillerson’s great relief, doubts about growth in Asia, and the surveillance culture we now live in where everybody knows your name…and a whole lot more. PJ tells you why some people may even welcome the idea of unfettered spying on citizens by governments everywhere. Stansberry Research analyst Bill Shaw joins the program to weigh in on gold and his recent article in American Consequences. It’s a first-person story about the state of subprime auto loans and late-night adventures with a repo man on the streets of Baltimore. Buck asks Bill which cars the midnight riders are towing away, and the answer is a tell-tale sign of a far too stretched consumer. Turney Duff, author of the Buy Side and contributor to American Consequences, calls in to tell PJ and Buck about the discussions he just had with the smartest traders he knows on Wall Street to get their opinion on the China trade. Turney sheds some light as to why some of the most experienced people in finance have completely missed the big move in Asia. Be sure to click here to never miss an episode ↓ SPOTIFY ► https://www.sbry.co/ufnNP GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/lkwhp ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/7OQ79 SOUNDCLOUD ► https://www.sbry.co/jHn5h STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/tEkL5 Check out NewsWire’s Investors MarketCast ↓ GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/dzzKq APPLE ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/GoCV0 STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/s86p1 ———————————— Follow us on Twitter ► https://www.sbry.co/p11ih Join our Facebook Community ► https://www.sbry.co/fMckK Check out our website ► https://www.sbry.co/wUAye Check out Stansberry NewsWire ►https://www.sbry.co/IhNeW Check out Health and Wealth Bulletin ► https://www.sbry.co/iHRmD Check out Extreme Value ► https://www.sbry.co/EvIiH ———————————— SHOW HIGHLIGHTS: 0:38 Buck introduces bestselling rabble-rouser and American Consequences editor P.J. O’Rourke, and they immediately get to the news of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s dismissal. “In Trump world, that’s not just a no-go… you’re finished.” 3:51 Buck and P.J. discuss what Secretary of State Mike Pompeo could mean for America and the Trump administration. Buck shares the first reactions from his contacts both in and out of government. 5:06 Buck shares his theory about why Tillerson, despite the humiliation of being fired via Twitter, may be secretly glad he’s leaving. 7:36 You may not see the telescreens (see 1984 by George Orwell), but that doesn’t mean they aren’t there. P.J. breaks down the nature of our surveillance state that makes 1984 pall by comparison. Buck concurs. “The Stasi would be jealous.” 11:04 P.J. breaks down the positive side of the surveillance state that no one ever thinks about. Really, surveillance isn’t good or bad – it’s only used for either good or bad. But what happens when the wrong people inherit government – and these mass surveillance tools? 17:50 Buck shares his reasons for warning people about social media. It’s not about privacy, or decades-old posts coming back to haunt you. “If your motto has to be ‘Don’t be evil’ there’s a problem.” 24:28 P.J. reveals the thinking behind his recent American Consequences piece “Doubts on Asia” and why, as dynamic as the economies there are and as exciting as the upside is, there are things that worry him. “This is a continent without a solid tradition of rule by the people.” 26:51 Buck introduces Stansberry’s top commodities expert, Bill Shaw, and gets straight to the question anyone following Bill’s adventures with “the Repo man” is wondering. 35:50 Buck asks Bill about the latest movement in gold prices now that 2017 marked gold’s biggest year since 2010. Bill explains why it’s so crucial today to have some part of your wealth stored in gold. 37:13 Buck introduces New York Times bestseller Turney Duff, a once-bright-eyed Wall Street newcomer whose determination to please that culture almost cost him his life. Turney tells you about how most big money managers have missed the China trade and why. 42:00 Turney shares the story of the people he knows who made money from Bernie Madoff, and Buck picks his brain about the chances of a real trade war with China.
The Escher Economy and a World of Pure Imagination with Grant Williams
 
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Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest videos ► https://www.sbry.co/suBiH Episode 26 - The Escher Economy and a World of Pure Imagination with Grant Williams Porter’s back from Nicaragua and he’s growing more and more concerned about corporate and consumer debt. In our current “Escher Economy” it’s hard to distinguish which way is up and which way is down. The underlying balance sheet of the US consumer is in big trouble and Porter tells listeners that the likely outcome could lead to big changes at America’s ballot box in 2020. Porter & Buck welcome special guest Grant Williams, co-founder of Real Vision TV. Known as “Netflix for finance geeks,” Real Vision is the world’s only video-on-demand channel with a finance and investor focus. Porter and Grant talk about how we’ve come to accept the madness of global economic activity over the last decade, how there seems to be a bubble forming in just about every asset class, and the two big signals to watch for that will show you when economies fueled by debt are about to run out of gas. Porter answers a listener’s question in the mailbag about gold and gold miners…and reveals one of the biggest mistakes you can make with these investments. Next week, Porter and Buck interview James Damore, the ex-Google employee who wrote the viral memo, “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber.” Be sure to click here to never miss an episode ↓ SPOTIFY ► https://www.sbry.co/ufnNP GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/lkwhp ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/7OQ79 SOUNDCLOUD ► https://www.sbry.co/jHn5h STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/tEkL5 Check out NewsWire’s Investors MarketCast ↓ GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/dzzKq APPLE ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/GoCV0 STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/s86p1 ———————————— Follow us on Twitter ► https://www.sbry.co/p11ih Join our Facebook Community ► https://www.sbry.co/fMckK Check out our website ► https://www.sbry.co/wUAye Check out Stansberry NewsWire ►https://www.sbry.co/IhNeW Check out Health and Wealth Bulletin ► https://www.sbry.co/iHRmD Check out Extreme Value ► https://www.sbry.co/EvIiH ————————————
A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Barsoom #1)
 
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John Carter, an American Civil War veteran, goes prospecting in Arizona and, when set upon by Indians, is mysteriously transported to Mars, called "Barsoom" by its inhabitants. Carter finds that he has great strength on this planet, due to its lesser gravity. Carter soon falls in among the Tharks, a nomadic tribe of the planet's warlike, four-armed, green inhabitants. A timeless classic of sci-fi fantasy literature, this is the first book in Burrough's Barsoom Series. Foreword - 00:00 Chapter 01. On the Arizona Hills - 7:52 Chapter 02. The Escape of the Dead - 24:28 Chapter 03. My Advent on Mars - 36:04 Chapter 04. A Prisoner - 53:14 Chapter 05. I Elude My Watch Dog - 1:07:32 Chapter 06. A Fight That Won Friends - 1:17:34 Chapter 07. Child-Raising on Mars - 1:27:55 Chapter 08. A Fair Captive from the Sky - 1:40:53 Chapter 09. I Learn the Language - 1:54:32 Chapter 10. Champion and Chief - 2:04:21 Chapter 11. With Dejah Thoris - 2:28:03 Chapter 12. A Prisoner with Power - 2:44:07 Chapter 13. Love-Making on Mars- 2:57:06 Chapter 14. A Duel to the Death - 3:12:21 Chapter 15. Sola Tells Me Her Story - 3:32:32 Chapter 16. We Plan Escape - 3:53:50 Chapter 17. A Costly Recapture - 4:17:00 Chapter 18. Chained in Warhoon - 4:36:21 Chapter 19. Battling in the Arena - 4:46:25 Chapter 20. In the Atmosphere Factory - 4:57:50 Chapter 21. An Air Scout for Zodanga - 5:19:22 Chapter 22. I Find Dejah - 5:42:07 Chapter 23. Lost in the Sky - 6:05:14 Chapter 24. Tars Tarkas Finds a Friend - 6:19:08 Chapter 25. The Looting of Zodanga - 6:36:23 Chapter 26. Through Carnage to Joy - 6:48:17 Chapter 27. From Joy to Death - 7:02:59 Chapter 28. At the Arizona Cave - 7:14:57 Read by Mark Nelson (https://librivox.org/reader/251) Book #1 in the John Carter (Barsoom) Audiobook Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTLQR-c2Hn-u9vR4RnZfM-hd4zaoFq8sS This is followed by "The Gods of Mars": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwvS0VZjIhc
Views: 8757 Audiobooks Unleashed
Open Board Meeting - October 22, 2014
 
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Watch the Federal Reserve's open Board meeting on the final credit risk retention rule.
Views: 1223 Federal Reserve
At Issue #3007 - Suicide Prevention - Live Town Hall
 
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Suicide is a public health issue that claims the lives of 44,000 Americans every year, more than homicides or accidents. A panel of 25 central Illinois-based professionals share methods on identifying suicidal tendencies in both adults and adolescents. The discussion centers on support services for those individuals considering suicide and for family and friends of those who die by suicide.
Views: 94 WTVP
A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Complete Unabridged Audiobook, First Barsoom installment
 
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Literary classic in an unabridged audio book format with synchronized text and interactive transcript. We invite you to subscribe, comment and share. Don't forget to hit the like button! Playlist-» http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znAoqLkkFzw&list=PLLG03REJaYO-ZUGQpIXcaxBH3Vfg9qFw7&index=1 Read by Mark Nelson A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs John Carter, an American Civil War veteran, goes prospecting in Arizona and, when set upon by Indians, is mysteriously transported to Mars, called "Barsoom" by its inhabitants. Carter finds that he has great strength on this planet, due to its lesser gravity. Carter soon falls in among the Tharks, a nomadic tribe of the planet's warlike, four-armed, green inhabitants. Thanks to his strength and combat abilities he rises in position in the tribe and earns the respect eventually the friendship of Tars Tarkas one of the Thark chiefs. The Tharks subsequently capture Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium, a member of the humanoid red Martian race. The red Martians inhabit a loose network of city states and control the desert planet's canals, along which its agriculture is concentrated. Carter rescues her from the green men to return her to her people. (Summary from Wikipedia) Total running time: 7:18:51 Chapters 00 to 02 -- 00:36:01 Chapters 03 to 04 -- 00:31:25 Chapters 05 to 06 -- 00:20:19 Chapters 07 to 08 -- 00:26:35 Chapters 09 to 10 -- 00:33:27 ChapterS 11 to 12 -- 00:28:59 Chapters 13 to 14 -- 02:56:50 Chapters 15 to 16 -- 00:44:24 Chapters 17 to 18 -- 00:29:23 Chapters 19 to 20 -- 00:32:56 Chapters 21 to 22 -- 00:45:50 Chapters 23 to 24 -- 00:31:09 Chapters 25 to 26 -- 00:26:33 Chapters 27 to 28 -- 00:16:27 This audio recording courtesy of Librivox. Audio and video edited by PublicAudioLibrary. Copyright 2013. PublicAudioLibrary. All Rights Reserved. The copyright for this story has expired in the United States and, thus, now resides in the public domain there. The text is available via Project Gutenberg. In anticipation of the 2012 Disney film John Carter, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. has trademarked the phrases "John Carter of Mars," "Princess of Mars," and "Barsoom," among others, despite the Dastar decision of the United States Supreme Court, which invalidates trademark on public domain works.
Views: 24704 PublicAudioLibrary
Secretary Kerry Attends the President's Task Force on Trafficking in Persons
 
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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers remarks at the President's Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the White House in Washington, DC on May 17, 2013. A text transcript can be found at http://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2013/05/209595.htm.
Ginnie Mae Issuer Roundtable
 
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Views: 345 HUDchannel
Family Options Study Outcome
 
02:02:34
Views: 712 HUDchannel
Red to Black: Improving the Collection of Delinquent Debt Owed to the Government
 
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Red to Black: Improving the Collection of Delinquent Debt Owed to the Government - House Oversight Committee - 2011-03-11 - House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Subcommittee on Government Organization, Efficiency, and Financial Management. Witnesses David Lebryk, Commissioner of Financial Management Service, U.S. Department of Treasury.
Views: 1281 HouseResourceOrg
Subways Are for Sleeping / Only Johnny Knows / Colloquy 2: A Dissertation on Love
 
01:29:15
Subways Are for Sleeping is a musical with a book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Jule Styne. The original Broadway production played in 1961-62. The musical was inspired by an article about subway homelessness in the March 1956 issue of Harper's and a subsequent 1957 book based on it, both by Edmund G. Love, who slept on subway trains throughout the 1950s and encountered many unique individuals. With the profits from his book, Love then embarked on a bizarre hobby: over the course of several years, he ate dinner at every restaurant listed in the Manhattan yellow pages directory, visiting them in alphabetical order. After two previews, the Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Michael Kidd, opened on December 27, 1961 at the St. James Theatre, where it ran for 205 performances. The cast included Orson Bean, Sydney Chaplin, Carol Lawrence, Gordon Connell, Grayson Hall, and Green's wife Phyllis Newman (whose costume, consisting solely of a towel, was probably Freddy Wittop's easiest design in his distinguished career), with newcomers Michael Bennett and Valerie Harper in the chorus. Subways Are for Sleeping opened to mostly negative reviews. The show already was hampered by a lack of publicity, since the New York City Transit Authority refused to post advertisements on the city's buses and in subway trains and stations for fear they would be perceived as officially sanctioning the right of vagrants to use these facilities as overnight accommodations. Producer David Merrick and press agent Harvey Sabinson decided to invite individuals with the same names as prominent theatre critics (such as Walter Kerr, Richard Watts, Jr. and Howard Taubman) to see the show and afterwards used their favorable comments in print ads. Thanks to photographs of the seven "critics" accompanying their blurbs (the well-known real Richard Watts was not African American), the ad was discovered to be a deception by a copy editor. It was pulled from most newspapers, but not before running in an early edition of the New York Herald Tribune. However, the clever publicity stunt allowed the musical to continue to run and it eventually turned a small profit. Newman won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, and nominations went to Bean for Best Featured Actor and Kidd's choreography. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subways_Are_For_Sleeping
Views: 456717 Remember This
Native American Housing: Obstacles and Opportunities
 
02:07:55
This briefing provides a quarterly update on the U.S. Housing Market Conditions and a policy discussion on Native American Housing. The information on the nation's housing markets and the discussion of challenges involved in supplying and maintaining tribal housing is of interest to HUD staff, advocates, researchers, practitioners and the general public.
Views: 626 HUDchannel
Part 2: Public Hearing on Section 232 Investigation of Aluminum Imports on National Security
 
01:32:50
Watch Part 1: https://youtu.be/kzd7J05Sr9Y The Secretary of Commerce initiated an investigation to determine the effects on the national security of imports of aluminum. This investigation has been initiated under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended. The Department of Commerce held a public hearing on the investigation on June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC at 9 am ET. Learn more: www.commerce.gov/aluminum
South Dakota House of Representatives   L D  17
 
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this is a replacement of the original file which had technical difficulties
Views: 110 SDPB
President's Management Advisory Board Meeting - Part 2
 
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The President's Management Advisory Board meets with key government officials to discuss the accomplishments made by the board's 2012 Subcommittees on Strategic Sourcing and Improper Payments and provide a robust update on the 2011 PMAB initiatives. October 12, 2012.
Views: 2525 The Obama White House
A Thorough Look at the 144,000
 
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Elder Ward doing an extensive look at the 144,000. - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tffg
Views: 284 TFFGNEWYORK
Wilbur Ross
 
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Wilbur L. Ross, Jr. is an American investor known for restructuring failed companies in industries such as steel, coal, telecommunications, foreign investment and textiles. He specializes in leveraged buyouts and distressed businesses. As of August 2014, Forbes magazine lists Ross as one of the world's billionaires with a net worth of $2.9 billion. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 41 Audiopedia
Calling All Cars: Trap to Catch a Mailman / The Army Game / Murder in Room 9
 
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The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 9747 Remember This
ClarkCountyNV Live Stream
 
07:25:40
This stream shows round-the-clock programming from the Clark County Television studios in downtown Las Vegas, Nevada. For more information about Clark County government, please visit www.ClarkCountyNV.gov.
Views: 47 ClarkCountyNV
The Ex-Urbanites / Speaking of Cinderella: If the Shoe Fits / Jacob's Hands
 
01:25:28
Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 -- 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. Best known for his novels including Brave New World and a wide-ranging output of essays, Huxley also edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories, poetry, travel writing, film stories and scripts. Huxley spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. Aldous Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist, and he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics. By the end of his life Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldous_Huxley
Views: 113089 Remember This
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 175444 Shari Wing
A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs | Full Audiobook | Subtitles
 
07:24:20
A Princess of Mars (version 2) Edgar Rice BURROUGHS John Carter, an American Civil War veteran, goes prospecting in Arizona and, when set upon by Indians, is mysteriously transported to Mars, called "Barsoom" by its inhabitants. Carter finds that he has great strength on this planet, due to its lesser gravity. Carter soon falls in among the Tharks, a nomadic tribe of the planet's warlike, four-armed, green inhabitants. Thanks to his strength and combat abilities he rises in position in the tribe and earns the respect eventually the friendship of Tars Tarkas, one of the Thark chiefs. The Tharks subsequently capture Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium, a member of the humanoid red Martian race. The red Martians inhabit a loose network of city states and control the desert planet's canals, along which its agriculture is concentrated. Carter rescues her from the green men to return her to her people. (Summary from Wikipedia) Genre(s): Action & Adventure Fiction, Science Fiction
Our Miss Brooks: The Bookie / Stretch Is In Love Again / The Dancer
 
01:28:08
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
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Senate Session 2011-11-09 (16:49:27-17:50:57)
 
01:01:31
The Senate convened and began a period of morning business. Thereafter, they moved to proceed to S.J.Res.6, a joint resolution disapproving the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission with respect to regulating the Internet and broadband industry practices.
Views: 417 CSPANSenate2011
Our Miss Brooks: The Auction / Baseball Uniforms / Free TV from Sherry's
 
01:29:55
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 63573 Remember This
Dragnet: Claude Jimmerson, Child Killer / Big Girl / Big Grifter
 
01:27:59
Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday's deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring." (Dunning, 210) Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough's death in 1951 (and therefore Romero's, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode "The Big Sorrow"), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 - April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero's nephew, April 17, 1952 - May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode "The Big Donation"); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top-rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives' personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) "Underplaying is still acting", Webb told Time. "We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee." (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans. Most of the later episodes were entitled "The Big _____", where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in "The Big Streetcar" the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect. Throughout the series' radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode "James Vickers", the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at "the road to San Pedro", clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(series)
Views: 57130 Remember This