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Search results “Manual of freshwater biota”
Natural Swimming Pools - a guide to designing & making your own
 
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David Pagan Butler introduces natural swimming pools: beautiful swimming ponds that require no chemicals, just plants and a simple solar powered filter pump to clean the water. This is the trailer for the full DVD available from http://www.green-shopping.co.uk/dvds/natural-swimming-pools.html
Views: 260556 PermacultureMedia
UMTMOOC - Water Quality Management For Ornamental Fish Culture
 
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Presented by - Dr. Lokman Nor Hakim bin Norazmi
Views: 514 UMTMOOC
HOW TO: Care & Maintain a Fluval Sea EVO Aquarium (ft. Mr. Saltwater Tank)
 
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Mark Callahan (a.k.a. Mr. Saltwater Tank) provides care and maintenance instructions for the Fluval EVO saltwater aquarium. Learn More: EVO Bonus Videos: http://bit.ly/2a7GvyG EVO Aquarium Series: http://bit.ly/2akIqms Mr. Saltwater Tank: http://bit.ly/2a4hia8
Views: 74772 Fluval Aquatics
Zetlight UFO LED - with smartphone control, 5 Different Settings
 
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Zetlight UFO LED - 4 Channels - https://reefbuilders.com/2016/06/09/zetlight-ufo-led-is-more-than-just-a-pretty-light/
Views: 20324 Reef Builders
Seawater
 
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Seawater or salt water is water from a sea or ocean. On average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5% (35 g/L, or 599 mM). This means that every kilogram (roughly one litre by volume) of seawater has approximately 35 grams (1.2 oz) of dissolved salts (predominantly sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl−) ions). Average density at the surface is 1.025 g/ml. Seawater is denser than both fresh water and pure water (density 1.0 g/ml @ 4 °C (39 °F)) because the dissolved salts add mass without contributing significantly to the volume. The freezing point of seawater decreases as salt concentration increases. At typical salinity it freezes at about −2 °C (28 °F). The coldest seawater ever recorded (in a liquid state) was in 2010, in a stream under an Antarctic glacier, and measured −2.6 °C (27.3 °F). Seawater pH is typically limited to a range between 7.5 and 8.4, and the speed of sound in seawater is, on average, roughly 1,500 m/s. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 156 Audiopedia
Red Sea Max Nano all in one Aquarium with AquaIllumination Prime LED
 
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http://ReefBuilders.com is the source for all your reef aquarium news - the latest on exotic fish, rare corals and hot new aquarium gear.
Views: 54068 Reef Builders
Aquaculture Challenge Introduction Webinar
 
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Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Elliot Nelson introduces the Aquaculture Challenge, a student competition that teaches biology, chemistry, physics, and business skills. In this webinar, learn about aquaculture in Michigan, how the competition works, and other cool aquaculture projects at Lake Superior State University.
Views: 41 Michigan Sea Grant
How to use a Hydrometer
 
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My salinity was a little low at 1.022 slowly raising it back to 1.024
Views: 27892 Yak-N-Bass
AQUACULTURE ECOSYSTEM S37780 PONNARASI KRISHNA MOORTHY
 
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Basic Scientific Equipment in Aquaculture Ecosystem Study
Views: 82 Ponnarasi Arasi
Trophic Structure Review
 
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Views: 415 Benjy Wood
PetSolutions: Living Sea Glass Hydrometer Plus
 
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8" glass hydrometer with built-in thermometer. Use to check specific gravity of aquarium water and to ensure all replacement water has the same salinity as your aquarium. For more information on this product, please visit our product page on our website. http://www.petsolutions.com/C/Aquarium-Hydrometers/I/Living-Sea-Glass-Hydrometer-Plus.aspx
Views: 9996 PetSolutions.com
Phytoplankton | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoplankton 00:00:52 1 Ecology 00:01:01 1.1 Carbon 00:02:42 1.2 Oxygen production 00:03:38 1.3 Minerals 00:05:08 1.4 Vitamin B 00:05:32 1.5 Temperature 00:06:08 1.6 pH 00:06:54 1.7 Food web 00:07:41 1.8 Structural and functional diversity 00:10:05 2 Growth strategy 00:12:29 3 Environmental controversy 00:17:03 4 Aquaculture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7867722831435369 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Phytoplankton are the autotrophic (self-feeding) components of the plankton community and a key part of oceans, seas and freshwater basin ecosystems. The name comes from the Greek words φυτόν (phyton), meaning "plant", and πλαγκτός (planktos), meaning "wanderer" or "drifter". Most phytoplankton are too small to be individually seen with the unaided eye. However, when present in high enough numbers, some varieties may be noticeable as colored patches on the water surface due to the presence of chlorophyll within their cells and accessory pigments (such as phycobiliproteins or xanthophylls) in some species.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Ocean Free Nano Marine 63L
 
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Livingreefaquariums.com.au
Seawater | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawater 00:01:35 1 Geochemistry 00:01:45 1.1 Salinity 00:03:08 1.2 Thermophysical properties of Seawater 00:04:55 2 Compositional differences from freshwater 00:06:14 3 Microbial components 00:11:48 4 Origin 00:13:19 5 Human impacts 00:14:33 6 Human consumption 00:18:57 7 Standard 00:19:31 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9420489897032759 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Seawater, or salt water, is water from a sea or ocean. On average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5% (35 g/L, 599 mM). This means that every kilogram (roughly one litre by volume) of seawater has approximately 35 grams (1.2 oz) of dissolved salts (predominantly sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl−) ions). Average density at the surface is 1.025 kg/L. Seawater is denser than both fresh water and pure water (density 1.0 kg/L at 4 °C (39 °F)) because the dissolved salts increase the mass by a larger proportion than the volume. The freezing point of seawater decreases as salt concentration increases. At typical salinity, it freezes at about −2 °C (28 °F). The coldest seawater ever recorded (in a liquid state) was in 2010, in a stream under an Antarctic glacier, and measured −2.6 °C (27.3 °F). Seawater pH is typically limited to a range between 7.5 and 8.4. However, there is no universally accepted reference pH-scale for seawater and the difference between measurements based on different reference scales may be up to 0.14 units.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Intern 2013 Stream Water Chemistry
 
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In an attempt to understand the effects of a changing climate in northeastern forests, this project investigated stream water chemistry responses to large rain events at Pine Creek, Arnot Forest, during the summer of 2013. An ISCO automated sampler was used to collect samples upon the start of significant storms. Samples were tested for abundance of nitrogen, carbon, and other ions. Upon completion of this project, conclusions were drawn that indicate that the ions in question are either diluted or flushed through the system when stream discharge increases.
Views: 129 ForestConnect
Scientists Study Impact of Vineyards on Local Ecosystem
 
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Scientists study the impact of vineyards on local ecosystem. Weather at the location of a vineyard is vital to the process of grape-growing for wine. Climate change may have an effect on where vineyards are able to grow but researchers are now also studying how the vineyards in turn have an environmental impact on the habitats of native plants and animals. Vineyards have the potential to attract invasive species rather than native species, and make a noticeable difference in freshwater resources. A study on projected climate change and the effect it will have on areas able to grow wine has predicted that 85 percent of the land in Europe currently used for vineyards will be unsuitable for growing wine grapes by the year 2050. The wine industry is already experiencing changes due to global warming. The alcohol content, along with the distinct flavor and aroma of traditional wine making locations throughout Europe is slowly changing. In places like Germany good red wine is being made, and Denmark is able to start vineyards, where it was too cold to grow grapes before. How do you think the wine industry will be impacted by climate change?
Views: 163 GeoBeats News
Marine Abiotic Factors Sample
 
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Testing the dissolved oxygen content, temperature, pH, salinity, and turbidity in a sample of marine water collected using a Niskin Water Sampling Bottle.
Views: 513 jyokogawa
National Biodiversity Centre (Singapore) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Biodiversity_Centre_(Singapore) 00:01:45 1 History 00:01:54 2 Organisation structure 00:02:21 2.1 Coastal and Marine Environment Program Office 00:03:45 2.2 International Relations 00:04:39 2.3 Marine 00:05:33 2.4 Terrestrial 00:06:05 3 Initiatives and products 00:06:15 3.1 National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 00:07:27 3.2 Singapore Red Data Book 00:08:34 3.3 The Singapore Index on Cities' Biodiversity 00:11:05 4 Key conservation activities and initiatives 00:11:17 4.1 Comprehensive Marine Biodiversity Survey of Singapore 00:12:29 4.2 Coastal protection and restoration at Pulau Tekong 00:13:24 4.3 "BiodiverCity" photo competition 00:14:08 4.4 Coral Nursery Project 00:15:13 4.5 Study on dragonflies 00:16:04 4.6 Hornbill Conservation Project 00:17:06 4.7 Banded leaf monkey conservation 00:18:14 4.8 Sembcorp Forests of Giants 00:19:38 4.9 The Singing Forest 00:20:17 4.10 Seagrass monitoring 00:21:12 5 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9182575420136365 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The National Biodiversity Centre (Abbreviation: NBC; Chinese: 国家生物多样性中心 ; Malay: Pusat Kepelbagaian Bio Nasional; Tamil: தேசிய பல்வகை உயிரியல் நிலையம்) is a branch of the National Parks Board and serves as Singapore’s one-stop centre for biodiversity-related information and activities. It manages all available information and data on biodiversity in Singapore. Diverse biodiversity-related information and data are currently generated, stored and updated by different organisations and individuals. The National Biodiversity Centre will maximize the usefulness of such information and data by linking them in a single meta-database. Having complete and up-to-date information is crucial for many decision-making processes involving biodiversity. This hub of biodiversity information and data at the National Biodiversity Centre will also allow knowledge gaps to be better identified and addressed. The National Biodiversity Centre takes responsibility for the conservation of both terrestrial and marine flora and fauna in Singapore and represents the National Parks Board in its role as the government's scientific authority on nature conservation. The National Biodiversity Centre will also represent Singapore in various biodiversity-related international and regional conventions, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, ASEAN Center for Biodiversity, ASEAN Working Group on Nature Conservation and Biodiversity and ASEANET.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Ecotoxicology of Antimicrobial PPCPs in Illinois Rivers & Streams
 
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Presented by Dr. John Kelly - Associate Professor, Department of Biology; Loyola University Chicago
Sabi feat. Tyga - Cali Love [OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO]
 
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Cali Love by Sabi - Feat. Tyga Get "Cali Love on iTunes:" http://SmartUrl.it/CaliLove Links: http://OfficialSabi.com Http://Facebook.com/SabiOfficial Http://Twitter.com/SabiSoundz
Views: 1977223 Sabi
Kiley Fellow Lecture: Danielle Choi
 
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Danielle Choi is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. She teaches in the Masters of Landscape Architecture core studio sequence and leads design research seminars. Choi’s research concerns the role of landscape architecture in the political ecology of the built environment. At the turn of the 20th century, large-scale infrastructure and public parks in American cities co-authored multiple narratives of environmental control, crisis management, and regional boundaries. Currently, her research on these issues concerns civil waterworks, aquatic ecology and the public realm in Chicago, and the politics of contemporary landscape preservation in these living environments. Choi is a licensed landscape architect in New York State and founder of LILAC. She was the 2016-2017 Daniel Urban Kiley Fellow in Landscape Architecture at the GSD. Prior to joining the GSD, she taught studio in urban design at Columbia University GSAPP and was a senior associate at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates in New York City, where she led strategy and design of complex urban landscapes and managed large, multi-disciplinary teams. Choi also worked as a designer at Topotek in Berlin and SCAPE in New York City. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in art history from the University of Chicago and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the GSD, where she received the Jacob Weidenmann graduation award for excellence in design.
Views: 1429 Harvard GSD
CHNEP Watershed Summit: A Comparison of Avian Abundance and Species Richness
 
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The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP) is a partnership working to protect the natural environment in Florida from Venice to Bonita Springs to Winter Haven. The CHNEP hosts the Charlotte Harbor Watershed Summit every three years to learn about current research and restoration efforts, critical environmental issues affecting the Charlotte Harbor watershed and to review progress since the preceding summit. Summits are important in the CHNEP process of bringing public and private stakeholders together. This video is of one of the 43 presentations given during the March 25-27, 2014 summit. Visit www.CHNEP.org/Summit2014.html to learn more and see PDF files of posters. This summit was made possible by all the speakers who donated their time and to sponsors. • $2,000: Mote Marine Laboratory | CF Industries • More than $1,000: Charlotte County | Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center | Mosaic • $500: Atkins | EarthBalance | Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission | Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. | Peace River Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority | Stantec • $250: Science and Environmental Council of Southwest Florida • $100: Benchmark EA | Friends of the Charlotte Harbor Aquatic Preserves | Friends of Charlotte Harbor Estuary, Inc. (CHNEP Friends) | Jaime Boswell, Freelance Natural Resources Consultant | Captain Joe Kliment | Lemon Bay Conservancy | Sierra Club - Greater Charlotte Harbor Group | Sierra Club - Calusa Chapter | Southwest Florida Watershed Council | Corrine and Tom Winter | Sierra Club Calusa Chapter | "Ding" Darling Wildlife Society/John McCabe | Robert Hilgendorf | anonymous donors • less than $100: Estero Bay Buddies | anonymous donors A comparison of Avian Abundance and Species Richness in Palustrine Emergent Wetlands in Southwest Florida Matthew P. Miller, [email protected] Christopher Meindl, PhD, [email protected] Melanie Riedinger-Whitmore, PhD, [email protected] Deby Cassill, PhD, [email protected] University of South Florida, 140 7th Avenue South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Wetlands are commonly thought of as transition areas between dry, upland habitats and deepwater habitats and can be the hydrologic gradient between a dry landscape and a lake or river, or they be can isolated from a flowing or deepwater system and completely surrounded by a dry landscape (Tiner 2001). Wetlands provide a valuable suite of services including providing foraging, nesting and denning habitat for birds, amphibians and other wildlife (Environmental Law Institute 2008; Stolt, et al. 2001). In southwest Florida, population growth has put enormous pressure on wetland landscapes. Wetland regulations in the state of Florida make clear that a wetland shall not be considered impacted by development if an undisturbed buffer averaging 25 feet is designed around a wetland (and minimum of 15 feet) remains (Southwest Florida Water Management District, Basis of Review, 2011). Four small (2-4 acre) palustrine emergent wetlands in Sarasota County, Florida were selected for analysis of their function as bird habitat by conducting avian surveys. Two of these wetlands are control wetlands (no development within one half mile) and the other two are urban (nearby residential development, with a 25 foot average buffer). There was no statistically significant difference between the median abundance and species richness of total birds found within, flying over or adjacent to the control and urban wetlands during the marsh bird breeding (dry) season (Mann-Whitney U: ?2 = 0.1656; p = 0.6841 and ?2 = 0.8614; p = 0.3533respectively). This study also found no statistically significant evidence that small palustrine emergent wetlands in southwest Florida surrounded by a natural landscape support a greater abundance or species richness of marsh birds than similar wetlands surrounded by a small upland buffer and urban development. Factors such as the absence of water and the presence of a predator (coyote) likely contributed to this result, but these factors require further investigation before one can conclude that small upland buffers surrounding urban wetlands are sufficient for maintaining marsh bird populations.
Views: 101 CHNEP1995
2013 Katterman Lecture - University of Washington School of Pharmacy
 
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Sean Sullivan, Stergachis Endowed director and professor of the UW Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program, presented "Better-Informed Patients, Better-Informed Pharmacists: Navigating the Changing Medication Information Landscape" on May 8, 2013 at the Museum of Flight. Dean of the School of Pharmacy Thomas Baillie and Pharmacy Alumni Association Board Member Adam Brothers introduce Sullivan.
Views: 5961 UWPharmacySchool
Environmental monitoring | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_monitoring 00:01:03 1 Air quality monitoring 00:03:40 1.1 Air sampling 00:05:05 2 Soil monitoring 00:07:50 2.1 Soil sampling 00:08:55 2.2 Monitoring programs 00:09:05 2.2.1 Soil contamination monitoring 00:11:24 2.2.2 Soil erosion monitoring 00:12:27 2.2.3 Soil salinity monitoring 00:13:58 3 Water quality monitoring 00:14:09 3.1 Design of environmental monitoring programmes 00:15:53 3.2 Parameters 00:16:08 3.2.1 Chemical 00:17:23 3.2.2 Biological 00:18:50 3.2.3 Radiological 00:20:28 3.2.4 Microbiological 00:22:19 3.2.5 Populations 00:23:15 3.3 Monitoring programmes 00:24:36 3.4 Environmental monitoring data management systems 00:25:59 3.5 Sampling methods 00:26:46 3.5.1 Judgmental sampling 00:27:56 3.5.2 Simple random sampling 00:30:10 3.5.3 Stratified sampling 00:31:27 3.5.4 Systematic and grid sampling 00:35:14 3.5.5 Adaptive cluster sampling 00:36:35 3.5.6 Grab samples 00:39:05 3.5.7 Semi-continuous monitoring and continuous 00:42:03 3.5.8 Passive sampling 00:43:10 3.5.9 Remote surveillance 00:44:43 3.5.10 Remote sensing 00:47:50 3.5.11 Bio-monitoring 00:48:53 3.5.12 Other sampling methods 00:49:50 3.6 Data interpretations 00:50:41 3.7 Environmental quality indices 00:52:11 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7391364526382356 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Environmental monitoring describes the processes and activities that need to take place to characterise and monitor the quality of the environment. Environmental monitoring is used in the preparation of environmental impact assessments, as well as in many circumstances in which human activities carry a risk of harmful effects on the natural environment. All monitoring strategies and programmes have reasons and justifications which are often designed to establish the current status of an environment or to establish trends in environmental parameters. In all cases the results of monitoring will be reviewed, analysed statistically and published. The design of a monitoring programme must therefore have regard to the final use of the data before monitoring starts.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
HBO2 Hyperbaric oxidiser 2018
 
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The Raddec HBO2 is a fully-integrated Hyperbaric Oxidiser System that has been designed to quantitatively oxidize combustible materials to water and carbon dioxide using pressurised oxygen in a precision engineered, closed-vessel. These systems are routinely used to extract volatile radionuclides from a range of materials as part of waste characterisation in the role of nuclear decommissioning, waste characterisation and environmental monitoring. Combustible materials such as plastics, rubber, oil, resins and soft wastes, are effectively decomposed and oxidised. In addition, foodstuffs and environmental materials such as biota are also readily decomposed to provide representative samples of Tritium and Carbon-14 for analysis. Complete and clean oxidation of organic-rich materials (foodstuffs, marine and freshwater fish, meat, vegetation, wood, oils, plastics, and soft wastes) The heart of the HBO is a five-litre precision engineered pressure vessel designed to safely operate up to 95 Bar. The system incorporates a user-friendly manual gas handling system including user-adjustable pressure regulation and flow control. A unique feature of the HBO2 include a novel, easy-to-use door-closure mechanism with an integrated combustion viewing window and pressure and temperature displays for real-time monitoring. Four safety interlocks and a dual pressure protection system ensures that the system functions safely. All key combustion-related parameters are recorded and displayed in real time using a Labview Program. The product gases produced during complete oxidation of materials are quantitatively collected through a cryo-trapping system that uses vacuum-grade glass condenser tubes fitted inside a graphite heat-exchanger block. The whole process from loading through ignition, venting and vacuum extraction and cleaning typically takes 1 hour per sample. HBO2 - Key features: The HBO2 hyperbaric oxidiser is a proven analytical device that has been in routine use in radioanalytical laboratories since 2012. Complete combustion of samples takes less than one and the oxidation of large samples offers improved ‘Limits of detection’ compared to slower thermal oxidisers - this extends analytical options for Environmental Monitoring, Nuclear Decommissioning and Fusion Reactor operational support. Clean tritiated water is extracted after combustion - Tritiated water is available for analysis by Liquid Scintillation Counting or Helium-3 in-growth mass spectrometry.