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Making Mining Work for Zambia: Economic, Health, & Environmental Nexus of the Copper Mining Economy
 
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Zambia's rich mineral resources are one of the country's most important assets. They contribute to national income, exports, employment and government revenue. As the country looks to the future, Zambia faces important choices on how to manage its mineral wealth. There are trade-offs in the design of the mining fiscal regime. Mining inevitably entails environmental and public health risks. Mining firms make choices about procurement that influences the industry's contribution to the Zambian economy. This brief video introduces the World Bank's Fifth Zambia Economic Brief "Making Mining Work for Zambia: The Economic, Health, and Environmental Nexus of Zambia's Copper Mining Economy," which was released in June 2015. It asks how Zambia can uses its mineral resources to help the country achieve its economic development ambitions. The report suggests areas where the government, business community, and civil society can collaborate to enhance the contribution of mining to Zambia.
Views: 5792 World Bank
Lead Exposure Risks in the Work Environment
 
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The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports that while many people worry about lead in their homes or in the environment, for some the workplace may offer the greatest potential for exposure. Lead is a toxic heavy metal. It can be combined with other metals to produce alloys. Lead and lead alloys are often used to make batteries, ammunition and other metal products. In the past, lead was also used regularly in fuel, paint, ceramics, caulk, pipes and solder among other things. Due to potential health issues from exposure, the amount of lead used in these products today has lessened or has been removed. Though used less often, NIOSH reports that lead is still common in many industries, including construction, mining and manufacturing. In these and other industries, workers can be at risk of being exposed to lead, by breathing it, ingesting it or coming in contact with it. NIOSH provides the following information for workers about how lead exposure can occur: • Workers can be exposed by breathing-in lead fumes or lead dust. Lead fumes are produced during metal processing, when metal is being heated or soldered. Lead dust is produced when metal is being cut or when lead paint is sanded or removed. Lead fumes and lead dust do not have an odor, so workers may not know they are being exposed. • Lead dust can settle on food, water, clothes and other objects. If a worker eats, drinks or smokes in areas where lead is being processed or stored, they could ingest it. Not washing one’s hands before eating or touching one’s mouth are also ways it could be ingested. • Workers can also be exposed by coming into contact with lead dust. Some studies have found lead can be absorbed through skin. Workers that handle lead and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth, could be exposed. Lead dust can also get on clothes and hair. If this happens, it’s possible that a worker could track home some of the lead dust, which may also expose their family. These are just a few things to know about lead exposure risks in the work environment. To learn more about this or other occupational, indoor air quality, health, safety or property issues, please visit the websites shown on the screen. Clark Seif Clark http://www.csceng.com EMSL Analytical, Inc. http://www.emsl.com LA Testing http://www.latesting.com Zimmetry Environmental http://www.zimmetry.com Healthy Indoors Magazine http://www.iaq.net Hudson Douglas Public Adjusters http://HudsonDouglasPublicAdjusters.com VOETS - Verification, Operations and Environmental Testing Services, LLC http://www.voetsnyc.com
Views: 5000 Paul Cochrane
Dangers of Lead Mining
 
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Lead is a valuable metal that is found everywhere around us, but mining for it can be very dangerous. Take a tour of a lead mine in this clip from Discovery Channel's "HowStuffWorks" show.
Views: 28419 HowStuffWorks
What Causes Accidents - Safety Training Video - Preventing Accidents & Injuries
 
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What Causes Accidents - Safety Training Video - Preventing Accidents & Injuries Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos It is hard to find an accident that could not have been prevented. Although it is often difficult to foresee every unsafe condition or potential hazard - training, constant vigilance and hazard awareness can prevent the vast majority of incidents and fatalities. Carelessness, distractions, ignorance and unnecessary risk-taking will lead to accidents and injuries. This safety training video outlines the two causes of most accidents and the human behaviors that make accidents happen. Understanding these causes and behaviors can help us reduce both the frequency and severity of accidents. For more videos like this one, see our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafetyMemos Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos Safety and Health Topics: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/index.html IRB Guidebook for BIOMEDICAL AND BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH: AN OVERVIEW; US Dept of Health & Human Services: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/archive/irb/irb_chapter5.htm#h3 Human factors: Behavioural safety: http://www.hse.gov.uk/humanfactors/topics/behaviouralsafety.htm
Views: 495519 Safety Memos
Lead Poisoning
 
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Once absorbed into our bodies, lead can have devastating effects on the brain and central nervous system. Learn more about lead poisoning on Discovery Channel's "HowStuffWorks" show.
Views: 53718 HowStuffWorks
Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers 1978 Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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more at http://quickfound.net "Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 4780 Jeff Quitney
Hazards of Lead
 
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Although less common than it used to be, lead exposure still occurs at work. This toxic metal can be found in a variety of industries, including construction, mining and manufacturing, according to NIOSH. The agency stresses that it is important for workers to understand how exposure to lead occurs so it can be avoided. Ways workers can be exposed include: Breathing in lead dust or fumes: Lead dust is created when metal is cut or lead paint is sanded. Lead fumes occur during metal processing. Consuming lead dust: Because lead dust can settle on food, clothes and other items, if you eat or drink in areas where lead is processed or stored, you can ingest lead. Coming in contact with lead dust: Workers can come in direct contact with lead dust via the eyes, nose, mouth or skin. Additionally, as lead dust can settle on clothes, workers may expose their families by tracking home lead dust. Short-term exposure to high levels of lead can cause abdominal pain, headaches, irritability, memory problems and loss of appetite. These symptoms often are overlooked because they tend to occur slowly over time, according to NIOSH. More serious health consequences of exposure to high levels of lead include kidney and brain damage, and even death. NIOSH offers numerous tips to help prevent lead exposure on the job. These include refraining from eating or drinking where lead-containing items are processed or stored, using a lead removal product to clean your hands, showering and changing your clothes and shoes before leaving work if you work in an environment that contains lead, and working in well-ventilated areas. Are you concerned that you may have been exposed to lead on the job? NIOSH recommends talking with your employer to see if routine BLL testing – a simple blood test that can measure your blood-lead levels – is conducted. If your employer does not conduct this testing, consult with your medical provider about having the test done, NIOSH states.
Part 3: Lead Exposure Risks in the Workplace
 
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https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ables/ https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/ For more health information visit www.health.mo.gov For news about the State of Missouri visit www.mo.gov
Views: 716 HealthyLivingMo
Why Lead Poisoning is so Dangerous
 
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A video to highlight the effects of lead poisoning. Recently, in Flint, Michigan, lead contaminated water sustained the city and civilians were exposed to lead in the process. Help spread awareness about the effects of lead poisoning by sharing this video. Also show your support by donating to the centers linked below. Written, edited, and narrated by: Maggie Bowen Music by: SAFAKASH Donate to Flint: -http://www.unitedwaygenesee.org/flint... (direct fund) -http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/13/us/iyw-... (ways to help) -http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/h... (ways to help) -http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/ho... (donation and support info) Other places where lead poisoning continues in the US: http://www.npr.org/2016/02/06/465702398/beyond-flint-in-the-south-another-water-crisis-has-been-unfolding-for-years Sources: General info on lead poisoning and its effects: http://www.water-research.net/index.p... http://www.healthline.com/health/lead... http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsh... http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10... http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releas... http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.as... http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/e... http://www.lead.org.au/fs/fst28.html (studies of schizophrenia and students being less likely to graduate as well as other cognitive effects) Flint: http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index... http://extension.psu.edu/natural-reso... Long term effects & Flint: http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/11/health/...
Views: 11027 CuriosityList
Asbestos
 
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Asbestos is a tough, heat-resistant mineral that was added to the building materials of many older homes. It can pose health hazards to workers and homeowners who renovate or demolish those homes. This animation shows how asbestos fibres could damage lung tissue and lead to lung disease.
Views: 289448 WorkSafeBC
Mining & Environment & Health
 
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Environmental impacts of mining. lets save our environment! http://bigfamily.am/eco
Views: 3991 vwvwvw
Most Toxic Substances On Earth
 
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Deadly toxins could be lurking in the places you would least expect them to. In small doses, some of these substances we’re about to mention are beneficial to mankind. However after years of exposure or getting splashed water from your own home aquarium could me enough to have life changing consequences. Other chemicals are engineered by scientists in laboratories to create as much destruction as possible. Some questionable things put into the foods we eat every day, to pollutants that are known to cause cancer, here are the most toxic substances on earth! 14. Hexavalent Chromium Hexavalent chromium is an oxidized form of the element chromium in the +6 oxidation state which is recognized as a human carcinogen. It’s more often than not found in industrial areas especially in tanneries in Hazaribagh, Bangladesh which can emit 21,600 cubic meters of toxic each day into the environment. It can also be found in textile dyes, wood preservation, anti corrosive agents to paint, and other surface coatings. It can also be formed from heating up or welding stainless steel or melting chromium. 13. Brominated Vegetable Oil In what case do you think bromite might be acceptable in your diet? Just about never?! Also konwn as BVO, it’s banned just about everywhere in the world as a food additive but it still in active use in the US and japan. Why would they add a strange substance in our drinks? It’s mainly to keep different flavors and ingredients from breaking apart and helps prevent certain flavors from floating up to the top. It might end up in your soft drinks like mountain dew, fanta sundrop and energy drinks. Despite pepsi cola and coca cola vowing to remove it from their soft drinks, it can still be seen in their ingredients. Brominated Vegetable oil might also be used as a pesticide, flame retardant, in nasal spray and plastics to name a few. It’s also linked to thyroid problems, skin rashes and other bad stuff. Check for this sneaky ingredient next time your shopping and let us know where you find it in the comment section 12. Lead HIgh levels of lead exposure can lead to fatality while lead build up in the body over a long period of time can have frightening and painful results. The city of Picher oklahoma became highly contaminated with lead which gave many a closer look of the symptoms. Teachers would report severe learning disabilities here and for a while no one was sure why but it definitely wasn’t from attention deficit disorder! It became evident that the tap water became mixed with lead that was being mined in the town. Sources of exposure can be from the following: soil, household dust, pottery, toys, paint chips, cosmetics, mexican candy, lead bullets, and mining. Many recalls have taken place from China because it was discovered that lead with paint was being used on toys such as hot wheels. 11. STevia You might see a drink that’s labelled as having natural flavoring but you might fully understand until you read the ingredients. A new sweetener is found in various coca cola products that is found in a plant, but, it can be processed to be 200 times sweeter than natural sugar without adding calories. The process used to create this extraordinarily sweet food is anything but natural, using chemicals such as ethanol, isopropanol and other complicated chemicals. You can see it labeled on this bottle as stevia extract If it’s so natural, why did coca cola want to patent their process of extracting the stevia sweetener from the plant?. Some studies would insist that something this sweet can cause the body to act in a similar way as if it were consuming something with actual sugar. 10. Silver There’s more than one reason you don’t wanna get a silver metal if you’re competing in the olympics. While silver might not be hazardous to the touch, ingesting silver orally can lead to bizarre complications.The condition, known as argyria is often caused from high amounts of chemical compounds from the element of silver or silver dust making their skin silver-like in the process. It can also turn the skin blue or a blue-ish grey. 92 year old man has a generalized form of argylia and you can tell how these chemical compounds have tragically affected him. It’s visible over large surfaces of the body but people with this condition can also appear to be physically in good shape despite their strange skin color. Stan Jones, a Libertarian candidate for US senate, ingested large amounts of silver thinking it had some type of home remedy with healing power. Strange but true.
Views: 99561 American Eye
Asbestos Exposure Explained
 
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Asbestos is a tough, heat-resistant mineral that was added to the building materials of many older homes. It can pose health hazards to workers and homeowners who renovate or demolish those homes. This animation shows how asbestos fibres could damage lung tissue and lead to lung disease. Presented by WorkSafe BC
Views: 44700 AdfaAustralia
5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10
 
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Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides. Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Ecosystem Services 00:51 The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07 Deforestation 06:42 Desertification 06:49 Global Warming 07:59 Invasive Species 08:51 Overharvesting 09:20 Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode: Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8 Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3n5P Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1165316 CrashCourse
Mining Safety - The Importance Of Being Seen
 
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3M Reflective Material Mining With Text Mining_Text.mp4 Personal Safety Division PSD Miners Mine Website Video
How Do MASSIVE Sinkholes Form?
 
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What are sinkholes, and how do these mysterious things form? Thanks to Skillshare for sponsoring this video. The first 500 people to use this link will get a 2 Month free trial of Skillshare http://skl.sh/lifenoggin Get your exclusive Life Noggin merch: http://www.keeponthinking.co Support Life Noggin on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/LifeNogginStudios Official Website: https://lnstudios.co Follow Us! https://twitter.com/LifeNoggin https://facebook.com/LifeNoggin https://www.instagram.com/lifenoggin Click here to see more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/lifenoggin Life Noggin is a weekly animated educational series. Whether it's science, pop culture, history or art, we explore it all and have a ton of fun doing it. Life Noggin Team: Director/Voice: http://lifenogg.in/PatGraziosi Executive Producer - Ian Dokie: http://instagram.com/iandokie Director of Marketing: http://lifenogg.in/JaredOban Animation by Steven Lawson Written by Michael Sago: https://twitter.com/MichaelSago Sources: https://www.britannica.com/science/sinkhole https://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/communities/community.cfm?id=10707 https://www.fws.gov/arkansas-es/IPaC/Karst.html https://www.uky.edu/KGS/water/general/karst/karst_landscape.htm http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130812-florida-sinkhole-disney-world-explainer-urban-science/ https://www.livescience.com/44123-what-are-sinkholes.html https://www.americangeosciences.org/critical-issues/faq/which-areas-are-most-risk-sinkholes https://water.usgs.gov/edu/sinkholes.html https://www.researchgate.net/publication/310747297_The_impact_of_droughts_and_climate_change_on_sinkhole_occurrence_A_case_study_from_the_evaporite_karst_of_the_Fluvia_Valley_NE_Spain http://drought.unl.edu/DroughtBasics/ClimateChange.aspx http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/report-findings/extreme-weather http://www.earthtech.com/residential/sinkhole-truth/sinkhole-warning-signs/ http://www.sinkhole.org/CommonSigns.php https://www.cbsnews.com/news/10-sinkhole-facts-that-could-save-your-life/ https://www.lakecountyfl.gov/departments/public_works/engineering/sinkhole.aspx https://ufonline.ufl.edu/infographics/how-to-spot-a-sinkhole/
Views: 881467 Life Noggin
Benefits of Bentonite Clay
 
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For more info: https://draxe.com/10-bentonite-clay-benefits-uses/?utm_campaign=Youtube-Apr-2015&utm_medium=social&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=bentonite In this video I want to talk to you about the many benefits of bentonite clay. This clay has been used for thousands of years to support skin health, reduce inflammation, support digestive health, and detoxification. The reason clay is beneficial is because it absorbs toxins and bad bacteria. Some of the main benefits are: 1. Detoxification 2. Anti-inflammatory (Anti-aging/ supports skin health) 3. Supports the Digestive system 4. Natural Multi-Vitamin Try consuming one teaspoon of clay a day and it will help your body reach its optimal level of health. For more information on bentonite clay, you can check out this article: http://draxe.com/10-bentonite-clay-benefits-uses/ *This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe, and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Views: 489557 Dr. Josh Axe
History of Lead
 
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Learn about the many ways humans have used lead, starting with the ancient Romans, on Discovery Channel's "HowStuffWorks" show.
Views: 51786 HowStuffWorks
Picher, Oklahoma, abandoned town, EPA superfund site, sinkholes - from a drone's perspective
 
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Picher is a ghost town and former city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. This was a major national center of lead and zinc mining at the heart of the Tri-State Mining District. More than a century of unrestricted subsurface excavation dangerously undermined most of Picher's town buildings and left giant piles of toxic metal-contaminated mine tailings (known as chat) heaped throughout the area. The discovery of the cave-in risks, groundwater contamination, and health effects associated with the chat piles and subsurface shafts resulted in the site being included in 1980 in the Tar Creek Superfund Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The state collaborated on mitigation and remediation measures, but a 1996 study found that 34% of the children in Picher suffered from lead poisoning due to these environmental effects, which could result in lifelong neurological problems.[4] Eventually the EPA and the state of Oklahoma agreed to a mandatory evacuation and buyout of the entire township. The similarly contaminated satellite towns of Treece, Kansas and Cardin, Oklahoma were included in the Tar Creek Superfund site. A 2006 Army Corps of Engineers study showed 86% of Picher's buildings (including the town school) were badly undermined and subject to collapse at any time.[5] The destruction of 150 homes by an EF4 tornado in May 2008 accelerated the exodus. On September 1, 2009, the state of Oklahoma officially dis-incorporated the city of Picher, which ceased official operations on that day. The population plummeted from 1,640 at the 2000 census to 20 at the 2010 census. As of January 2011, only six homes and one business remain, their owners having refused to leave at any price. Except for some historic structures, the rest of the town's buildings were scheduled to be demolished by the end of the year. One of the last buildings, which had housed the former Picher mining museum was destroyed by arson in April 2015. Fortunately, its historical archives and artifacts had previously been shipped elsewhere. Picher is among a small number of locations in the world (such as Gilman, Colorado, Centralia, Pennsylvania, and Wittenoom, Western Australia) to be evacuated and declared uninhabitable due to environmental and health damage caused by the mines the town once serviced.
Views: 39691 Drone Dude
Lead Mining Safety
 
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Find out how lead miners counteract some of their hazardous working conditions in this clip from Discovery Channel's "HowStuffWorks" show.
Views: 9633 HowStuffWorks
Innovation, Safety and the Future of Mining | Curtin University Lecture
 
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The future of mining, where is it going? Join our four prominent alumni as they lead this conversation and share their expertise on innovation, safety, policy and leadership within the industry. Speakers: - Mr Neil Warburton (Master of Ceremonies), Executive Chairman at White Rivers Exploration - Mr Greg Lilleyman, Director of Operations at Fortescue Metals Group - Dr Vanessa Guthrie, Chairman of the Minerals Council of Australia - Mr Steve Durkin, Managing Director at Safescape Chapter Markers: This Alumni Innovator Series: Innovation, Safety and the Future of Mining was held on Wednesday 31 May 2017 at our Bentley Campus. This video has been closed captioned.
Views: 1467 Curtin University
Abandoned Mines are Dangerous!
 
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The New Mexico Abandoned Mine Land Program developed this video to educate the public of the dangers of abandoned mines. There are numerous abandoned mines throughout the western U.S. and many are an accident waiting to happen. If you find an abandoned mine, stay away and keep yourself safe. For a full length DVD of this video, contact the New Mexico Abandoned Mine Land Program at (505) 476-3400. For more information go to http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/MMD/AML/AMLmain.htm.
Views: 222518 Mike Miner
How Do Sinkholes Form?
 
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Sinkholes form through both natural and human-made processes. First 100 people to sign up will get three meals off their Blue Apron order free! Click here: http://cook.ba/2qouQFb This video is sponsored by Blue Apron. Most of us think about erosion on the surface of the earth, but erosion can occur in the subsurface as well. In fact, scientist and engineers have a very creative name for just such a process: internal erosion. If just the right factors come together in the subsurface, some very interesting things can occur, including sinkholes. -Patreon: http://patreon.com/PracticalEngineering -Website: http://practical.engineering Memories by SNDR & Joey Shigrov is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1Q2PpM5To8 Tonic and Energy by Elexive is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6fBPdu8w9U
Views: 6872346 Practical Engineering
Iridium - The MOST RARE Metal on Earth!
 
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Chemical Elements: http://www.ebay.com /usr/novaelementscom?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 NOVAELEMENTS: https://www.novaelements.com/ Mel Science chemical sets: https://goo.gl/SxwFlQ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Thoisoi?ty=h Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thoisoi2 Interesting page about chemical experiments: http://m.chemicum.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thoisoi/ So today I will tell you about the most rare metal on Earth - iridium. Iridium is a transitional metal, which is located in the middle of the periodic table, below rhodium. If we take a look at the prevalence of all elements in the earth's crust, Iridium holds the last place, that is a billion atoms of all that there is and only one atom of iridium. This metal is 40 times rarer than gold. In much higher concentrations iridium is found in meteorites and also in the depths of the Earth, in magma. Interestingly enough, in the layers of rock sediments, though more precisely in the formation of clay, that is aged about 66 million years there were found high concentrations of iridium and this can indicate the collision of Earth with a huge meteorite in the past, which in theory was the cause of the death of the dinosaurs. In it’s appearance iridium is a shiny metal that does not oxidize in air. This metal has almost the highest density of all metals, just 0.12% lower than that of osmium - the most dense metal. In this tiny tiny metal droplet, which is of the size of a match head, we have 1 gram of iridium. To help you understand how high is the density of iridium, I will show other metals with the same mass for comparison. Lead, copper, gallium, zinc, magnesium, and the lightest metal - lithium. The volumes of the first and last metal differ by about 30 times, although their mass is the same. Iridium is also a very hard metal that is firmer than the solid steel in 1.5 (one and a half) times. Iridium, in addition to its rarity is even the most stable metal that does not oxidize in air up to 2000 degrees, and is not soluble in either acid or aqua regia. Iridium can only react with the fluorine at temperatures of about 600 degrees. Unfortunately, due to the low activity of iridium, I cannot conduct any chemical experiments or have quality reactions with it. The only thing that I can do is make a fine powder of iridium and set it on fire in the air, but as you can see, in this case iridium dust is burning quite slowly and also requires dispersing it in the air. For the first time on youtube, you can observe a burning iridium. Also, due to the low activity of iridium, the metal does not tarnish in air, even when heated to above 1,000 degrees. The only thing that the drop of iridium got covered with is a partially evaporated ceramic layer, the one that the forceps are made from. Iridium compounds are can be either brown or yellow, such as the complex of Vasca, which is used as a catalyst in organic chemistry. By the way, Iridium is the only element that can give away 9 electrons and form compounds with +9 (plus nine) oxidation state. Iridium now finds many uses in science and technology. In most cases, we will probably find iridium in spark plugs for vehicles, due to the high stability of iridium to oxidation under the influence of electric discharge. Pure iridium is used for making crucibles for growing single crystals, foil for making non-amalgam cathodes, as well as as a part of the highly resistant to corrosion alloys. The first standard of mass of one kilogram was created in 1889 using an alloy composition of 90% platinum and 10% iridium and is called the International Prototype Kilogram, it is still kept in the Paris Chamber of Weights and Measures. Now you know more about one more of the elements, if you would like the scientific series of the elements to continue, please subscribe to my channel and also throw in some likes if you can! Thank you for watching.
BEST FORTNITE MEMES COMPILATION
 
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Thanks for watching my Fortnite Memes Compilation , like the video if you enjoyed and Subscribe! 2,000 likes for a new video Follow me on Twitter! Link - https://twitter.com/FreeMemesKids Help Us Reach Our Goal Of 100,000 Subscribers by Subscribing & Sharing This Video! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- All clips used fall under the fair use act and are used for entertainment purposes only! If there are any problems with the videos or songs featured send me an email at: [email protected] and we'll resolve the issue! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- dank memes, dank, meme, memes, edgy, dankest, funny af, offensive memes, vine videos, meme compilation, dank meme compilation, idubbbz, pewdiepie, filthy frank, Emisoccer, Succ my meme, Stolen memes for stolen kids, freememeskids, ninja, ali-a, fortnite, fortnite battle royale memes, fortnite funny moments
Views: 7877302 Freememeskids
Human activities that threaten biodiversity
 
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How do humans negatively affect biodiversity? Our actions in a given environment cause problems directly and indirectly. For more biodiversity tutorials, visit http://bit.ly/cas-khan.
Lead Ore Milling 1934 US Bureau of Mines
 
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Nestled deep within the eastern Ozarks is an area known as the Old Lead Belt; it is a major part of the great Southeast Missouri lead district, the premier lead mining district of the world. The mining industry in this area has played an important role in Missouri's economic and social fabric for more than 280 years. St. Joseph Lead Co. is one of the major corporate enterprises that came to Missouri to mine lead. Lead and zinc production involved crushing and grinding the mined rock to standard sizes and separating the ore. This left behind piles of leftover rock called tailings that covered 4,000 acres in southeastern Cherokee County. These wastes were also a source of contamination. Lead, zinc, and cadmium from the tailings leached into the shallow ground water, contaminating local wells, and runoff moved contaminants into nearby streams and rivers. Wind also blew fine metal-bearing dust (from tailings piles and roads made of tailings) into the air, spreading the contamination to nearby non-mined areas. Radon gas from the mining operations was detected in the air around Galena. During the 1980's, this area was considered one of the most environmentally blighted in the nation. Some of the cleanup efforts are funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund. The EPA began working in the area in the early 1980's and work is ongoing. The EPA divided the Cherokee County Site into six subsites that correspond to six general mining locations, including the areas around Galena, Baxter Springs, and Treece, Kansas. Because the area in and around Galena had some of the worst contamination, early cleanup efforts were centered there. Chief among these was the provision of safe water supply for rural residents whose wells had been contaminated. Two new wells were constructed in the deep aquifer, and a new rural water district was formed that currently provides over 500 households with a long-term source of clean drinking water. From 1997 to 1999, contaminated soil was removed from 602 residential properties in Galena and replaced with clean backfill and grass sod or seed; fifty additional properties were remediated in 2000 and 2001. Remediation of residential soils has been completed in Treece and is ongoing in Baxter Springs. Cleanup continues at other sites in southeastern Kansas. For more information, check the EPA Region 7's website: http://www.epa.gov/region07/index.html . It does not matter if a person breathes in, swallows, or absorbs lead particles, the health effects are the same; however, the body absorbs higher levels of lead when it is breathed in. Within our bodies, lead is absorbed and stored in our bones, blood, and tissues. It does not stay there permanently, rather it is stored there as a source of continual internal exposure. Lead poisoning can happen if a person is exposed to very high levels of lead over a short period of time. When this happens, a person may feel: Abdominal pain, Constipated, Excessively tired, Headache, Irritable, Loss of appetite, Memory loss, Pain or tingling in the hands and/or feet and Weak. Because these symptoms may occur slowly or may be caused by other things, lead poisoning can be easily overlooked as their cause. Being exposed to high levels of lead may cause anemia, weakness, and kidney and brain damage. Very high lead exposure can cause death. A person who is exposed to lead over time may feel: Abdominal pain, Constipated, Depressed, Distracted, Forgetful, Irritable, Nauseous/Sick. People with prolonged exposure to lead may also be at risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney disease, and reduced fertility. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have determined that lead is probably cancer-causing in humans. This clip is from the 1934 US Bureau of Mines film (made in cooperation with the St. Joseph Lead Company), THE STORY OF LEAD MINING AND MILLING. The entire film shows mining and milling operations in Southeast Missouri after diamond drills have located a lead vein. The film also shows the dairy, school, hospital, and offices of the St. Joseph Lead Company. The entire film is available at the US National Archives in Maryland.
Views: 3856 markdcatlin
Oxygen Deficiency In Body - Hypoxia Signs And Symptoms
 
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Help us feed starving children around the world or heal sick children. https://teespring.com/stores/waysandhow When you buy WaysAndhow’s merchandise you help us support one of these worthy charities: Shriners Hospitals for Children, Feed My Starving Children, or Wounded Warrior Project. Note: To see who your purchases will support, on the merchandise page, put your mouse or cursor on the charity seal to reveal the charity name. --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Oxygen is an essential part of living when you lack adequate oxygen it can lead to death. In this video, we will walk you through 8 signs of Oxygen Deficiency In Body - Hypoxia Signs And Symptoms that will indicate that your body lacks adequate oxygen - Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 42560 WaysAndHow
Product, Health, and Safety Engineers Career Video
 
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This career video provides day in the life information about the following jobs and occupations. JOB TITLE: Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors OCCUPATION DESCRIPTION: Promote worksite or product safety by applying knowledge of industrial processes, mechanics, chemistry, psychology, and industrial health and safety laws. Includes industrial product safety engineers. RELATED JOB TITLES: Industrial Safety and Health Engineers, Fire Prevention and Protection Engineers, Product Safety Engineers ONET: 17-2111.00 JOB TITLE: Fire-Prevention and Protection Engineers OCCUPATION DESCRIPTION: Research causes of fires, determine fire protection methods, and design or recommend materials or equipment such as structural components or fire-detection equipment to assist organizations in safeguarding life and property against fire, explosion, and related hazards. RELATED JOB TITLES: Chief Engineer, Consulting Engineer, Design Director, Engineer, Fire Protection Engineer, Fire Protection Engineer and Code Consultant (FP Engineer and Code Consultant), Lead Fire Protection Engineer, Loss Control Manager, Senior Engineer, Senior Fire Protection Engineer ONET: 17-2111.02 JOB TITLE: Product Safety Engineers OCCUPATION DESCRIPTION: Develop and conduct tests to evaluate product safety levels and recommend measures to reduce or eliminate hazards. RELATED JOB TITLES: Extra Vehicular Activity Safety Engineer (EVA Engineer), Product Safety and Standards Engineer, Product Safety Consultant, Product Safety Coordinator, Product Safety Engineer, Product Safety Manager, Product Safety Officer, Risk Control Product Liability Director, Service Loss Control Consultant, System Safety Engineer ONET: 17-2111.03 Learn more about this and other occupations, jobs, and careers at: www.CareerOneStop.org
Views: 283 CareerOneStop
The Dangers of Lead: Part 1
 
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GREEN BAY -- In Wisconsin, thousands of children are exposed to lead every year, some with levels so high they are poisoned. Lead poisoning can leave children with lower IQ’s, learning difficulties and a greater likelihood of behavior problems.
Views: 1003 NBC 26
Mining in San Miguel Ixtahuacán: Conflict and Criminalization pt.1
 
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In lead up to the Peoples' International Health Tribunal on Goldcorp, to be held in San Miguel Ixtahuacan, we made a series of videos based on the work of mimundo.org photojournalist, James Rodriguez. These videos will be featured in the livestream of the event, which will take place July 14-15, 2012. Original photoessay found here: http://www.mimundo.org/2008/10/15/mining-in-san-miguel-ixtahuacan-conflict-and-criminalization/ more information about the tribunal: On the weekend of July 14, affected community members, scientists, academics, spiritual leaders, journalists and human rights advocates will converge in San Miguel Ixtahuacán, home to Goldcorp's infamous Marlin mine, for the Peoples' International Health Tribunal. Distinguished judges will hear testimony from expert witnesses and directly-affected community members living near Goldcorp's mines in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala. The judges will then deliver a ruling at the end of the tribunal, summarizing their observations and recommendations. Read about the tribunal's guiding principles, as well as bios of expert witnesses and judges here: http://healthtribunal.org/ Livestream of event: http://healthtribunal.org/resources/the-tribunal-live/ The health tribunal is organized by the Mining Injustice Solidarity Network (MISN), along with the Mesoamerican Movement against the Extractive Mining Model (M4), the San Miguel Ixtahuacán Defense Front (FREDEMI), the Parrish Commission Kolol Qnan Tx'otx' of San Miguel Ixtahuacán and the International Coalition against Unjust Mining in Guatemala (CAMIGUA), and includes representatives from the United States, Canada, Honduras, Chile, Mexico, El Salvador and Guatemala.
Views: 682 MiningInjustice
Asbestos Awareness Safety Training
 
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Let's be careful out there! Asbestos is a very real hazard in performing telecommunications installations for fios, uverse, comcast, directtv, or even the bottom rung of the communications ladder, Dishnetwork.
Views: 84499 elvis316
Funny Workplace Safety Training Video
 
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Small taste of the most unusual workplace safety training video ever produced.. A Reaper's Guide to OHS. This 4 min safety scene can be shown as an icebreaker for any workplace safety training session. Complete version: https://www.channel1.com.au/product/a-reapers-guide-to-ohs/ whilst entertaining and engaging, provides a general overview of occupational health and safety.
Views: 958072 Channel 1 Creative Media
How to Combat Leaf Miners in your Garden! (They eat your plants from the inside & leave lines)
 
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I'm fighting Leaf Miners in this video. I show you two methods for control of these little pains in the leaf. Visit my blog: http://reaganite71.blogspot.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/reaganite71 Check out my garden shirt store: http://reaganite71.spreadshirt.com/ For more information on Leaf Miners & their life cycle check out Bayer Crop Science's video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezxCCd3qfRY Intro music courtesy of Kevin MacLeod (www.smartsound.com/royalty-free-music/incompetech)
Views: 98604 Reaganite71
MSHA celebrates National Miners Day, December 6
 
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Congress declared December 6 to be National Miners Day, a day to recognize and honor the more than 370,000 miners who work in the United States today. This video, by the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, provides an overview of mining today with a brief look back to a more dangerous time.
Views: 3036 USDepartmentofLabor
Trump Nominates Acting EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler, A Former Coal Lobbyist, To Lead Agency | TIME
 
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President Trump nominates acting EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler, a Former Coal Lobbyist, to lead Agency. Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Trump Nominates Acting EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler, A Former Coal Lobbyist, To Lead Agency | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
Views: 2797 TIME
Professional Perspectives on Water Fluoridation
 
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Professional Perspectives on Water Fluoridation - Available on DVD In a full length video produced by the Fluoride Action Network, respected professional researchers, scientists, and health practitioners openly discuss their experience and opinions concerning the adverse health effects and ethical problems associated with the public health policy of water fluoridation. Featuring a Nobel Laureate in Medicine, three scientists from the National Research Council's landmark review on fluoride, as well as dentists, medical doctors, and leading researchers in the field, this professionally-produced 28 minute DVD presents a powerful indictment of the water fluoridation program. Here the list of Professionals included on the video: The 28-minute DVD Professional Perspectives on Fluoridation features the following 15 experts:
 Lord Baldwin sits as an Independent Peer in the House of Lords, where he has contributed to debates on the environment and health for over 20 years. His Parliamentary Questions on fluoridation led to the UK Government setting up the 'York' systematic scientific review of the evidence in 2000, on whose advisory panel he served. He is Co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Fluoridation - http://www.appgaf.org.uk/
 Arvid Carlsson, PhD, a neuro-pharmacologist. Dr. Carlsson led the successful fight against fluoridation in Sweden in the 1970's. He won the Nobel prize for medicine/physiology in 2000.
 Bob Carton, PhD, a risk assessment expert at the EPA (now retired). Dr. Carton was formerly the President of the union which represents professionals working at the US EPA headquarters in Washington DC. See Dr. Carton's important review of the National Research Council report (NRC, 2006) at Carton, RJ (2006) Fluoride: Review of the 2006 National Research Council Report: Fluoride in Drinking Water. Fluoride, 39(3) 163-172. http://www.fluorideresearch.org/393/files/FJ2006_v39_n3_p163-172.pdf
 Sir Iain Chalmers, PhD, edits The James Lind Library, a web-based resource containing explanatory material in seven languages about the principles and evolution of fair tests of medical treatments. He was director of the UK Cochrane Centre between 1992 and 2002, and director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit between 1978 and 1992.
 Paul Connett, PhD, an environmental chemist. Formerly, Professor of Chemistry at St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY. Currently the Executive Director, Fluoride Action Network, http://fluoridealert.org/
 Brent Foster, JD, formerly Conservation Chair of the Oregon chapter of the Sierra Club.
 Walter Graham helped in the very successful campaign to resist the imposition of water fluoridation on Northern Ireland.
 Bill Hirzy, PhD, a chemist, formerly with the US EPA. Dr. Hirzy is a former Vice-President of the union which represents professionals working at the US EPA headquarters in Washington, DC.
 C. Vyvyan Howard, MB, ChB, PhD, FRCPath, a fetal and infant toxico-pathologist. Professor Howard is director of the Bioimaging Research Group, Centre for Molecular Bioscience, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland; and President of the International Society of Doctors for the Environment (ISDE).
 Bob Isaacson, PhD, a neuroscientist. Dr. Isaacson was a member of the National Research Council review panel, Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Review of EPA's Drinking Water Standards (NRC, 2006) and also co-author of a very important animal study: Varner JA, et al. 1998. Chronic administration of aluminum-fluoride and sodium-fluoride to rats in drinking water: alterations in neuronal and cerebrovascular integrity. Brain Research. 784: 284-298.
 Tim Kropp, PhD, a toxicologist formerly with the Environmental Working Group in Washington, DC.
 Hardy Limeback, DDS, PhD, currently chair of Preventive Dentistry, University of Toronto. Past President of the Canadian Association for Dental Research and member of the National Research Council review panel, Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Review of EPA's Drinking Water Standards (NRC, 2006).
 Phyllis Mullenix, PhD, a pharmacologist and toxicologist. Former chairperson of the toxicology department of Forsyth Dental Institute, Boston. Lead author of the seminal paper on fluoride's impact on animal brain: Mullenix P, et al. 1995. Neurotoxicity of Sodium Fluoride in Rats. Neurotoxicology and Teratology. 17: 169-177.
 Bill Osmunson, DDS, MPH, a dentist who practices in both Oregon and Washington state.
 Kathleen Thiessen, PhD, a health risk specialist working with the consulting firm Senes Oak Ridge Inc., Center for Risk Analysis, Tennessee. Dr. Thiessen was a member of the National Research Council review panel, Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Review of EPA's Drinking Water Standards (NRC, 2006). To purchase a DVD and learn more about this video, please visit the Fluoride Action Network at: www.FluorideAlert.org
Views: 71804 fluoridealert
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
Views: 2049848 CrashCourse
STAY OUT and STAY ALIVE, ABANDONED MINE SAFETY
 
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The mining legacy goes back to the early 1800's leaving us with more than 500,000 abandoned mine openings nationwide. These old mines and water-filled pits and quarries pose a multitude of hazards. The Utah Bureau of Land Management, Utah Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program and Colorado Inactive Mine Reclamation Program have cooperatively produced this video as an educational tool to show the dangers associated with abandoned mines.
Views: 107328 Utah DOGM
Sulfur Dioxide & Exposure Concerns
 
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Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is one of a group of highly reactive gasses known as oxides of sulfur. It is a colorless gas with a pungent and suffocating odor. It is a common air pollutant found in many parts of the world. Much of the sulfur dioxide in the air comes from the burning of coal and oil at electric power plants. Other sources of sulfur dioxide come from industrial facilities that use coal or oil, petroleum refineries, cement manufacturing, metal mining and processing, paper pulp manufacturing and copper smelting. Trains, large ships and some diesel equipment may burn high sulfur fuels which also contributes to sulfur dioxide in the air. Sulfur dioxide has also been used as a food preservative and for food processing; as a disinfectant; for bleaching flour, fruit, grain, wood pulp, wool, textile fibers, wicker, gelatin and glue; and for making other chemicals. It is also used for wastewater treatment. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides can react with precipitation, oxygen and other substances in the atmosphere to form acid rain. People can be exposed to sulfur dioxide outdoors by breathing polluted air. This is more likely to occur in the summer, when the sun and hot temperatures react with pollution to form smog. Natural pollution sources, such as plant decay and volcanoes can also expose people to this gas. People who live near or work in facilities that utilize sulfur dioxide or produce it as a by-product may also be exposed. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, “Breathing sulfur dioxide can irritate the nose, throat, and lungs, and cause coughing and shortness of breath. Short-term exposure to sulfur dioxide can cause stomach pain, menstrual disorders, watery eyes, inhibition of thyroid function, loss of smell, headache, nausea, vomiting, fever, convulsions, and dizziness.” They also report, “Short-term exposure to high levels of sulfur dioxide in the air can be life-threatening by causing breathing difficulties and obstructing airways, especially for people with lung disease. Long-term exposure to persistent levels of sulfur dioxide can cause chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and respiratory illness. It can also aggravate existing heart disease.” These are just a few things to know about sulfur dioxide, exposure risks and potential health concerns. To learn more about this or other indoor and outdoor air quality, health and safety, occupational or environmental issues, please visit the websites shown below. Clark Seif Clark http://www.csceng.com EMSL Analytical, Inc. http://www.emsl.com Indoor Environmental Consultants, Inc. http://www.iecinc.net LA Testing http://www.latesting.com Zimmetry Environmental http://www.zimmetry.com Healthy Indoors Magazine http://www.iaq.net Hudson Douglas Public Adjusters http://HudsonDouglasPublicAdjusters.com
Views: 23995 Paul Cochrane
Protection Against Radioactivity in Uranium Mines 1969 US Bureau of Mines
 
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This film from the United States Bureau of Mines presents general descriptions of the hazards of radon daughters in uranium mines, and outlines the environmental control, principles and procedures for mitigating the hazard. Scenes of underground mines show the origin and reason of the hazard, and various methods of ventilation are shown on how to correct the condition. Uranium mining occurred mostly in the southwestern United States and drew many Native Americans and others into work in the mines and mills. Despite a long and well-developed understanding, based on the European experience earlier in the century, that uranium mining led to high rates of lung cancer, few protections were provided by employers or government for US miners before 1962 and their adoption after that time was slow and incomplete. Some US officials and scientists advocated ventilation requirements in US mines as a proactive, preventative measure during the 1950s, on the basis of their knowledge of European experience. Duncan Holaday, an industrial hygienist with the PHS, has generally been recognized as the most prominent advocate for ventilation. He led the effort to obtain measurements of radon in the mines, and he used the data to argue forcefully within the government that ventilation would be effective and was feasible. His arguments achieved only limited success, as there was government resistance to requiring ventilation and his views were not made public at the time. The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was an obstacle. In the late 1940s, controversy erupted in the New York Operations Office over the hazards from beryllium and uranium mining. The AEC wrote worker health requirements in contracts with companies that handled beryllium. After conflicting recommendations from staff, it chose not to establish such requirements for uranium. It claimed to lack legal authority, but it did not explain the legal difference between uranium and beryllium. The AEC did not lack knowledge: records of a January 25, 1951, internal meeting of AEC and PHS staff reveal that, on the basis of early measurements, they believed that radon was present in levels that would cause cancer and that ventilation could abate the hazard. Public acknowledgment of this problem was apparently squelched. For instance, Hueper, the scientist who wrote the 1942 review and who was then at the National Cancer Institute, was forbidden to speak in public about his concerns about the health hazard of radon in uranium mines. It is reported that he was even forbidden to travel west of the Mississippi, lest he say too much to the wrong people. The resulting high rates of illness among miners led in 1990 to passage of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act. For more details, see the outstanding article, The History of Uranium Mining and the Navajo People, in the Sept 2002 American Journal of Public Health at http://www.ajph.org/cgi/reprint/92/9/1410 .
Views: 2033 markdcatlin
Funny Safety Training Video, Perfect for Safety Meeting Openers | DuPont Sustainable Solutions
 
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Preview the full "Wrong Way Right Way: Safety Cases" training program here: http://ecom.training.dupont.com/SAF018-DVD-ENG(CoastalU)/SE/en-US/ProductDetails_us/Wrong-training.aspx?cid=ytb.saf018 Research has shown that laughter helps engage students, enhance recall and improve learning. Guided by this principle, our "Wrong Way Right Way: Safety Cases" training program helps inject fun into safety training. It uses funny snippets to show employees the "wrong way" to handle 10 common safety issues. Once the wrong way has been established, the clips then take on a more serious tone to demonstrate important safety principles and the "right way" to approach these issues. Each clip serves as a great meeting opener or refresher training that can be done in just minutes. Available on DVD. Individual safety cases available as streaming videos. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/DSSLearning ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyright © 2012 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. All rights reserved. The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont™, The miracles of science™ and all products denoted with ® or ™ are registered trademarks or trademarks of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company or its affiliates.
Human Impact On The Environment
 
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Video about the influence that humans have and are having on our planet.
Views: 395169 epers
Lead Poisoning
 
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This story looks at how lead paint is removed from a home safely. It's not as easy as most people think.
Views: 10853 Jen Christensen
You Are a Safety Leader! - Leadership - Safety Training Video
 
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You Are a Safety Leader! - Leadership - Safety Training Video Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos Whether you realize it or not, you are a leader. Someone in your life looks to you for leadership, guidance, advice, or any one of a number of reasons. In every industry, from nursing to warehouse operations to retail and manufacturing, transformational leadership is taking hold, and successful leaders know that team building in safety builds and maintains a vibrant safety culture. This short training video outlines some of the attitudes, attributes and characteristics of good and bad leaders. Behaviors modeled by successful leaders include ongoing hazard awareness, familiarity with safety information and regulations, including GHS, and SDS, and proper body mechanics. Workplace safety is a journey, not a destination. Leaders put their egos aside and build on their success, using it to inspire others to promote a valued and effective safety culture. For more videos like this one, see our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafetyMemos OSHA Safety Management Leadership https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/safetyhealth/comp1_mgt_lead.html Good Health & Safety Leadership http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/lwit/assets/downloads/good-health-safety-leadership.pdf Mining Publication: Leadership Characteristics in Escape from Three Underground Mine Fires http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/works/coversheet1177.html
Views: 80724 Safety Memos
Put Himalayan Salt Lamp In Your Bedroom And This Will Happen
 
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You don’t know what you’re missing if you’ve never owned a Himalayan salt lamp. It’s like having an open window – a softly glowing natural source of fresh, clean air – on your desk, in your living room, next to the bed, or anywhere you choose to put it. Himalayan salt lamps are made from pure, food grade, Himalayan salt crystals and can even be powdered to use as salt in recipes if needed. These beautiful lamps have gained massive popularity recently and there are many benefits attributed to them. Here are some of the most popular benefits of using Himalayan salt lamp. 1.Neutralize Electromagnetic Radiation. Everyday appliances such as televisions, cell phones, computers and tablets release positive ions into the air constantly. These and other common electronics can cause an overflow of electromagnetic radiation which, although invisible, is believed to cause some serious long-term effects. Constant exposure to electromagnetic radiation is known primarily to cause fatigue, increase stress and weaken the immune system. Himalayan salt lamps emit negative ions and cancel out positive ones. Therefore, by neutralizing electromagnetic-radiation, they help reduce artificial frequencies and even prevent static buildup. 2.Cleanse, Deodorize, and Purify Air. Himalayan pink salt lamps help clean the air through an operation called Hygroscopy, which attracts and absorbs contaminated water molecules from the immediate environment and locks them into the salt crystal. The process has the amazing ability to remove cigarette smoke, dust and other contaminants from the air. This benefit is particularly popular, as salty air acts as an overall health booster and can help clear the air passages. 3.Better Sleep. Over-exposure to positive ions reduces the brain’s blood and oxygen supply, which can lead to irregular sleeping patterns. The negative ions from a Himalayan salt lamp are said to reverse this effect, making them a popular sleep-aid. Also, in direct relation to chromotherapy, the soothing light can help people who suffer from insomnia. Plants too can help. 4.Raise Energy Levels. Positive ions deplete the body of energy, and it is believed that Himalayan salt lamps can actually do the opposite. The negative ions increase energy levels, which yields a refreshing effect similar to the feeling of rejuvenation achieved from spending time in nature.  5.Boost Blood Flow. Particular studies have suggested that negative ions, such as those emitted by Himalayan salt lamps, can accelerate blood flow. This boost helps to improve several disorders of the vascular system and can prevent certain damage to the lungs.  6.Enhance Mood. Many studies suggest that negative ions improve mood and energy levels by increasing serotonin in the brain. Therefore, Himalayan salt lamps can benefit people suffering from seasonal affective disorder and other forms of depression.  When it comes to buying Himalayan pink salt lamps, coverage is determined by the size of the crystal. Smaller lamps are good for the average bedroom, while larger lamp are better for spaces like the living room or den. On average, 1 lb of Himalayan Pink Salt crystal will cleanse the air in approximately a 4′ x 4′ area. NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide. Images licensed under Creative Commons: www.wikihow.com canstockphoto.com www.pixabay.com Pinterest
Views: 381318 Natural Ways
Lead Mining With Google - Using the Google Keyword Tool
 
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http://esiowebconsulting.com/affiliate - Esio provides an amazing training program for it's affiliates. You can make between $100 and $500 per sale! Visit our website for more details on how you can start CASHING in by SIMPLY sending us LEADS using this free technique that utilizes the Google Keyword Tool.
Views: 122 MrTravelincome
His PC keeps shutting down... here is why
 
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It is INCREDIBLY important to keep your PC clean. Dust build up is the leading cause to PC death. Dust can become conductive which can lead to bigger issues. KEEP YOUR PC CLEAN! In this video it is suspected that the dust may have been causing the internal circuit protection in the PSU to fault which is why it would randomly shut off, and in my case, wouldn't turn on at all. Check out the duster that I used in this video on Amazon - http://amzn.to/2dJPxnV Learn more about Cooler Masters Master Maker lineup at http://www.coolermaster.com ○○○ All music provided with permission by audiomicro.com ○○○ SUBSCRIBE! http://bit.ly/sub2JayzTwoCents WATCH MY MOST POPULAR VIDEOS!: (link) ••• Follow me on your favorite Social Media! ••• Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jayztwocents Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jayztwocents Instagram: http://instagram.com/jayztwocents# About JayzTwoCents Your one stop place to shop for fun and educational videos on all things tech! Oh, and don't forget gaming! Gotta make time for gaming! His PC keeps shutting down... here is why | JayzTwoCents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8eBAMb66k4 JAYZTWOCENTS https://www.youtube.com/user/Jayztwocents
Views: 1576429 JayzTwoCents
War & Expansion: Crash Course US History #17
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Mexican-American War in the late 1840s, and the expansion of the United States into the western end of North America. In this episode of Crash Course, US territory finally reaches from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific Ocean. After Oregon was secured from the UK and the southwest was ceded by Mexico, that is. Famous Americans abound in this episode, including James K Polk (Young Hickory, Napoleon of the Stump), Martin Van Buren, Zachary Taylor, and Winfield Scott. You'll also learn about the California Gold Rush of 1848, and California's admission as a state, which necessitated the Compromise of 1850. Once more slavery is a crucial issue. Something is going to have to be done about slavery, I think. Maybe it will come to a head next week. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny
Views: 2026720 CrashCourse
How Do Kidney Stones Form? How Can We Prevent Them? Animation Video - Renal Calculi Pathophysiology
 
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Kidney stone facts A kidney stone is a hard, crystalline mineral material formed within the kidney or urinary tract. Nephrolithiasis is the medical term for kidney stones. Symptoms of a kidney stone include flank pain (the pain can be quite severe) and blood in the urine (hematuria). Kidney stones form when there is a decrease in urine volume and/or an excess of stone-forming substances in the urine. Dehydration is a major risk factor for kidney stone formation. People with certain medical conditions, such as gout, and those who take certain medications or supplements are at risk for kidney stones. Diet and hereditary factors are also related to stone formation. Diagnosis of kidney stones is best accomplished using an ultrasound, IVP, or a CT scan. Most kidney stones will pass through the ureter to the bladder on their own with time. Treatment includes pain-control medications and, in some cases, medications to facilitate the passage of urine. If needed, lithotripsy or surgical techniques may be used for stones which do not pass through the ureter to the bladder on their own. A kidney stone, also known as a renal calculus or nephrolith, is a calculus formed in the kidneys from minerals in the urine. Kidney stones typically leave the body by passage in the urine stream, and many stones are formed and passed without causing symptoms. If stones grow to sufficient size (usually at least 3 millimeters (0.12 in)) they can cause blockage of the ureter. This leads to pain, most commonly beginning in the flank or lower back and often radiating to the groin or genitals. This pain is often known as renal colic and typically comes in waves lasting 20 to 60 minutes. Other associated symptoms include: nausea, vomiting, fever, blood in the urine, pus in the urine, and painful urination. The diagnosis of kidney stones is made on the basis of information obtained from the history, physical examination, urinalysis, and radiographic studies. Ultrasound examination and blood tests may also aid in the diagnosis. Urinary stones are typically classified by their location in the kidney (nephrolithiasis), ureter (ureterolithiasis), or bladder (cystolithiasis), or by their chemical composition (calcium-containing, struvite, uric acid, or other compounds). Slightly more men are affected than women. Blockage of the ureter causes decreased kidney function and dilation of the kidney. In those who have previously had stones, prevention is recommended by drinking fluids such that more than two liters of urine is produced per day. If this is not effective enough, thiazide diuretic, citrate or allopurinal may be taken. It is recommended that soft drinks containing phosphoric acid (typically colas) be avoided. When a stone causes no symptoms, watchful waiting is a valid option. For stones which are causing symptoms, pain control is usually the first measure, using medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or opioids. More severe cases may require procedures. For example, some stones can be shattered into smaller fragments using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Some cases require more invasive procedures. Examples of these are cystoscopic procedures such as laser lithotripsy or percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Sometimes, a tube (ureteral stent) may be placed in the ureter to bypass the obstruction and alleviate the symptoms, as well as to prevent ureteral stricture after ureteroscopic stone removal. Prevention of kidney stones may include a combination of lifestyle changes and medications. Lifestyle changes You may reduce your risk of kidney stones if you: Drink water throughout the day. For people with a history of kidney stones, doctors usually recommend passing about 2.6 quarts (2.5 liters) of urine a day. Your doctor may ask that you measure your urine output to make sure that you're drinking enough water. If you live in a hot, dry climate or you exercise frequently, you may need to drink even more water to produce enough urine. If your urine is light and clear, you're likely drinking enough water. Eat fewer oxalate-rich foods. If you tend to form calcium oxalate stones, your doctor may recommend restricting foods rich in oxalates. These include rhubarb, beets, okra, spinach, Swiss chard, sweet potatoes, nuts, tea, chocolate and soy products. Choose a diet low in salt and animal protein. Reduce the amount of salt you eat and choose nonanimal protein sources, such as legumes. Consider using a salt substitute.
Views: 148556 Science Art