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The Secret step-by-step Guide to learn Hacking
 
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totally clickbait. but also not clickbait. I don't know where to start hacking, there is no guide to learn this stuff. But I hope you still have a plan now! How to learn hacking - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKXd9zW1OuI The ultimate guide, everything you need to know - https://google.com Stuff that looks cool: crypto challenges - https://cryptopals.com/ wargames - https://overthewire.org other exploit challenges - http://pwnable.kr/ basics of exploitation (+ my playlists) - https://exploit-exercises.com/protostar/ math puzzles with programming - https://projecteuler.net break ethereum smart contracts - https://ethernaut.zeppelin.solutions/ Try something new: create an android app - https://developer.android.com/training/basics/firstapp/index.html create a website with python - http://flask.pocoo.org/ do some nice animations - https://processing.org/tutorials/ make some LEDs blink - https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/HomePage Other Channels: GynvaelEN - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCkVMojdBWS-JtH7TliWkVg MurmusCTF - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUB9vOGEUpw7IKJRoR4PK-A MalwareAnalysisForHedgehogs - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVFXrUwuWxNlm6UNZtBLJ-A hasherezade - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNWVswPNgn5kutPNa5sprkg IppSec - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa6eh7gCkpPo5XXUDfygQQA John Hammond - https://www.youtube.com/user/RootOfTheNull -=[ 🔴 Stuff I use ]=- → Microphone:* https://amzn.to/2LW6ldx → Graphics tablet:* https://amzn.to/2C8djYj → Camera#1 for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2SJ66VM → Lens for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2CdG31I → Connect Camera#1 to PC:* https://amzn.to/2VDRhWj → Camera#2 for electronics:* https://amzn.to/2LWxehv → Lens for macro shots:* https://amzn.to/2C5tXrw → Keyboard:* https://amzn.to/2LZgCFD → Headphones:* https://amzn.to/2M2KhxW -=[ ❤️ Support ]=- → per Video: https://www.patreon.com/join/liveoverflow → per Month: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClcE-kVhqyiHCcjYwcpfj9w/join -=[ 🐕 Social ]=- → Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow/ → Website: https://liveoverflow.com/ → Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/ -=[ 📄 P.S. ]=- All links with "*" are affiliate links. LiveOverflow / Security Flag GmbH is part of the Amazon Affiliate Partner Programm.
Views: 713457 LiveOverflow
Microsoft Build 2019 - LIVE Stream - Day 2 (May 7)
 
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To watch more sessions and ask questions live on air head over to https://aka.ms/MicrosoftBuildLive
Views: 15364 Microsoft Developer
Lecture 51   Introduction to Computer Security Principles and Practice   Windows and Linux Security
 
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Like the video and Subscribe to channel for more updates. Recommended Books: The Tangled Web – A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications http://amzn.to/2yU13u7 The Web Application Hacker's Handbook: Finding and Exploiting Security Flaws, 2ed http://amzn.to/2kfm0Hj Computer Security: Art and Science http://amzn.to/2yaXRGZ Fundamentals of Database System http://amzn.to/2yaS984 Help the channel Grow by buying anything through the above links
Views: 64 KNOWLEDGE TREE
DEF CON 22 - Panel - Ask the EFF - The Year in Digital Civil Liberties
 
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Panel: Ask the EFF: The Year in Digital Civil Liberties Kurt Opsahl Deputy General Counsel, Electronic Frontier Foundation Nate Cardozo EFF Staff Attorney Mark Jaycox EFF Legislative Analyst Yan Zhu EFF Staff Technologist Eva Galperin EFF Global Policy Analyst KURT OPSAHL is the Deputy General Counsel of the Electronic Frontier Foundation focusing on civil liberties, free speech and privacy law. Opsahl has counseled numerous computer security researchers on their rights to conduct and discuss research. Before joining EFF, Opsahl worked at Perkins Coie, where he represented technology clients with respect to intellectual property, privacy, defamation, and other online liability matters, including working on Kelly v. Arribasoft, MGM v. Grokster and CoStar v. LoopNet. Prior to Perkins, Opsahl was a research fellow to Professor Pamela Samuelson at the U.C. Berkeley School of Information Management & Systems. Opsahl received his law degree from Boalt Hall, and undergraduate degree from U.C. Santa Cruz. Opsahl co-authored "Electronic Media and Privacy Law Handbook.” In 2007, Opsahl was named as one of the “Attorneys of the Year” by California Lawyer magazine for his work on the O'Grady v. Superior Court appeal, which established the reporter’s privilege for online journalists. In addition to his work at EFF, Opsahl is a member of the USENIX Board of Directors. NATE CARDOZO is a Staff Attorney on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s digital civil liberties team. In addition to his focus on free speech and privacy litigation, Nate works on EFF's Who Has Your Back? report and Coders' Rights Project. Nate has projects involving automotive privacy, government transparency, hardware hacking rights, anonymous speech, electronic privacy law reform, Freedom of Information Act litigation, and resisting the expansion of the surveillance state. A 2009-2010 EFF Open Government Legal Fellow, Nate spent two years in private practice before returning to his senses and to EFF in 2012. Nate has a B.A. in Anthropology and Politics from U.C. Santa Cruz and a J.D. from U.C. Hastings where he has taught first-year legal writing and moot court. EVA GALPERIN is EFFs Global Policy Analyst, and has been instrumental in highlighting government malware designed to spy upon activists around the world. A lifelong geek, Eva misspent her youth working as a Systems Administrator all over Silicon Valley. Since then, she has seen the error of her ways and earned degrees in Political Science and International Relations from SFSU. She comes to EFF from the US-China Policy Institute, where she researched Chinese energy policy, helped to organize conferences, and attempted to make use of her rudimentary Mandarin skills. MARK JAYCOX is a Legislative Analyst for EFF. His issues include user privacy, civil liberties, surveillance law, and "cybersecurity." When not reading legal or legislative documents, Mark can be found reading non-legal and legislative documents, exploring the Bay Area, and riding his bike. He was educated at Reed College, spent a year abroad at the University of Oxford (Wadham College), and concentrated in Political History. The intersection of his concentration with advancing technologies and the law was prevalent throughout his education, and Mark's excited to apply these passions to EFF. Previous to joining EFF, Mark was a Contributor to ArsTechnica, and a Legislative Research Assistant for LexisNexis. YAN ZHU is a Staff Technologist with EFF. Yan writes code and words to enable pervasive encryption and protect Internet users' privacy. Besides maintainingHTTPS Everywhere at EFF, she is a core developer ofSecureDrop and founder of the Worldwide Aaron Swartz Memorial Hackathon Series. In her spare time, Yan writes about the intersection of computer security and humansand tries to find interesting ways to break web applications. She holds a B.S. in Physics from MIT and was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow at Stanford. Twitter: @eff Twitter: @kurtopsahl
Views: 7806 DEFCONConference
Women in computing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_computing 00:01:46 1 History 00:01:55 1.1 1700s 00:02:47 1.2 1800s 00:06:39 1.3 1910s 00:07:32 1.4 1920s 00:09:09 1.5 1930s 00:09:33 1.6 1940s 00:16:06 1.7 1950s 00:19:13 1.8 1960s 00:23:54 1.9 1970s 00:27:36 1.10 1980s 00:33:08 1.11 1990s 00:38:08 1.12 2000s 00:39:23 1.13 2010s 00:40:56 2 Gender gap in computing 00:43:54 3 Turing Award recipients 00:44:33 4 Karen Spärk Jones Award recipients 00:45:24 5 Organizations 00:47:40 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8008990026177235 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Women in computing have shaped the evolution of information technology. They were among the first programmers in the early-20th century, and contributed substantially to the industry. As technology and practices altered, the role of women as programmers has changed, and the recorded history of the field has downplayed their achievements. Since the 18th century, women have developed scientific computations, including Nicole-Reine Lepaute's prediction of Halley's Comet, and Maria Mitchell's computation of the motion of Venus. The first algorithm intended to be executed by a computer was designed by Ada Lovelace who was a pioneer in the field. Grace Hopper was the first person to design a compiler for a programming language. Throughout the 19th and early-20th century, and up to World War II, programming was predominantly done by women; significant examples include the Harvard Computers, codebreaking at Bletchley Park and engineering at NASA. After the 1960s, the "soft work" that had been dominated by women evolved into modern software, and the importance of women decreased. The gender disparity and the lack of women in computing from the late 20th century onward has been examined, but no firm explanations have been established. Nevertheless, many women continued to make significant and important contributions to the IT industry, and attempts were made to readdress the gender disparity in the industry. In the 21st century, women held leadership roles in multiple tech companies, such as Meg Whitman, president and chief executive officer of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Marissa Mayer, president and CEO of Yahoo! and key spokesperson at Google.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Bitcoins and Gravy #67 Brain Wallets Explained!
 
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Show Notes : https://letstalkbitcoin.com/blog/post/bitcoins-and-gravy-67-brain-wallets-explained Transcript : http://bitcoinsandgravy.com/bitcoins-and-gravy-67-brain-wallets-explained-transcript Transcription/Captioning provided by : https://diaryofafreelancetranscriptionist.com https://twitter.com/TranscriptJunky
Views: 38 Bitcoins and Gravy
Hacker (computer security) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_hacker 00:01:23 1 History 00:07:12 2 Classifications 00:08:48 2.1 White hat 00:09:35 2.2 Black hat 00:10:40 2.3 Grey hat 00:11:37 2.4 Elite hacker 00:12:07 2.5 Script kiddie 00:12:50 2.6 Neophyte 00:13:16 2.7 Blue hat 00:13:49 2.8 Hacktivist 00:14:38 2.9 Nation state 00:14:55 2.10 Organized criminal gangs 00:15:13 3 Attacks 00:16:04 3.1 Security exploits 00:17:01 3.2 Techniques 00:27:13 4 Notable intruders and criminal hackers 00:27:25 5 Notable security hackers 00:32:47 6 Customs 00:33:49 6.1 Hacker groups and conventions 00:35:12 7 Consequences for malicious hacking 00:35:24 7.1 India 00:35:33 7.2 Netherlands 00:36:25 7.3 United States 00:37:59 8 Hacking and the media 00:38:09 8.1 Hacker magazines 00:38:46 8.2 Hackers in fiction 00:39:14 8.2.1 Books 00:40:29 8.2.2 Films 00:40:38 8.3 Non-fiction books Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7335957740646921 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A security hacker is someone who seeks to breach defenses and exploit weaknesses in a computer system or network. Hackers may be motivated by a multitude of reasons, such as profit, protest, information gathering, challenge, recreation, or to evaluate system weaknesses to assist in formulating defenses against potential hackers. The subculture that has evolved around hackers is often referred to as the computer underground.There is a longstanding controversy about the term's true meaning. In this controversy, the term hacker is reclaimed by computer programmers who argue that it refers simply to someone with an advanced understanding of computers and computer networks, and that cracker is the more appropriate term for those who break into computers, whether computer criminal (black hats) or computer security expert (white hats). A 2014 article concluded that "... the black-hat meaning still prevails among the general public".
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Hacker (computer security)
 
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In the computer security context, a hacker is someone who seeks and exploits weaknesses in a computer system or computer network. Hackers may be motivated by a multitude of reasons, such as profit, protest, challenge or enjoyment. The subculture that has evolved around hackers is often referred to as the computer underground and is now a known community. While other uses of the word hacker exist that are not related to computer security, such as referring to someone with an advanced understanding of computers and computer networks, they are rarely used in mainstream context. They are subject to the longstanding hacker definition controversy about the term's true meaning. In this controversy, the term hacker is reclaimed by computer programmers who argue that someone who breaks into computers, whether computer criminal (black hats) or computer security expert (white hats), is more appropriately called a cracker instead. Some white hat hackers claim that they also deserve the title hacker, and that only black hats should be called "crackers". This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 212 Audiopedia
The Kitchen's Finally Burned Down: DLP Security Bakeoff  - Duo Tech Talk
 
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Despite a plethora of data security and protection standards and certifications, companies and their systems are still leaking information like a sieve. For instance, Data Loss Prevention (DLP) solutions have often been touted as the "silver bullet" that will keep corporations from becoming the next headline. With deployment models ranging from a fat agent on an endpoint, to a blinky-lights box surveilling all network traffic, to some unified threat management gateway with DLP secret sauce, these solutions are ripe for bypass -- or worse. This talk will discuss our previous and current research into a handful of DLP solutions, including their capabilities and their shortcomings. We will demonstrate flaws in administrative and programmatic interfaces and the inspection engines themselves. Via this presentation we hope to have the audience walk away with a better understanding of the reality of certain classes of security products-- their advantages, their detriments, and whether or not they are of value to their organization. Additionally, we will detail the tools and techniques we used to discover these issues, to arm attendees with the knowledge to test these and similar products on their own. Bio: Zach Lanier is a Senior Research Scientist with Optiv, specializing in various bits of network, application, mobile, and embedded security. Prior to joining Optiv, Zach most recently served as a Senior Security Researcher with Duo Security. He has spoken at a variety of security conferences, such as Black Hat, DEFCON, CanSecWest, INFILTRATE, COUNTERMEASURE, and SummerCon, and is a co-author of the "Android Hackers' Handbook" (Wiley, 2014).
Views: 665 Duo Security
The Insecurity of Things - Duo Tech Talk
 
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6:30pm ET There is a latent distrust of the growing "Internet Of Things" market. The data collected by them is becoming more personal all while proliferation of internet connected devices is continuing without regard to privacy or security. Recent news stories has consumers concerned not only with privacy but also surveillance and data handling. There is no trusted third-­party "consumer advocacy" for privacy. To compound the problem, "IoT" and internet connected consumer devices are each made from custom hardware and software. This lack of homogeneity in design makes traditional software­ based security (like "anti­virus") virtually impossible. These devices and apps are literally "black boxes" that we entrust our privacy to. Bio: Stephen A. Ridley is a security researcher at Xipiter (http://www.xipiter.com/). He has more than 10 years of experience in software development, software security, and reverse engineering. Prior to Xipiter, Mr. Ridley served as the Chief Information Security Officer of a financial services firm and prior to that was a Senior Researcher at Matasano. He also was Senior Security Architect at McAfee, and a founding member of the Security and Mission Assurance (SMA) group at a major U.S defense contractor where he did vulnerability research and reverse engineering in support of the U.S. intelligence community. He has spoken about reverse engineering and software security at Black Hat, ReCon, CanSecWest, EuSecWest, Syscan and other prominent information security conferences. Stephen is a co-author of "The Android Hacker's Handbook" published by Wiley & Sons. At Xipiter we've been working on the security of embedded systems and IOT devices. Xipiter has built several industry unique trainings (http://www.xipiter.com/training) on mobilesecurity and embedded device security. Each of which has sold out at Blackhat (the largest security conference in the world) for three years in a row. We've helped numerous manufacturers secure their embedded devices. From card-payment systems and set-top entertainment manufacturers to more esoteric vendors of Gaming systems (lottery, casino, etc) and Industrial Controls Systems. We also publicly blog about our exploitation of these devices (http://www.xipiter.com/musings).
Views: 1590 Duo Security