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ZEITGEIST: MOVING FORWARD | OFFICIAL RELEASE | 2011
 
02:41:25
Please support Peter Joseph's new, upcoming film project: "InterReflections" by joining the mailing list and helping: http://www.interreflectionsmovie.com LIKE Peter Joseph @ https://www.facebook.com/peterjosephofficial FOLLOW Peter Joseph @ https://twitter.com/ZeitgeistFilm * Sign up for TZM Mailing List: http://www.thezeitgeistmovement.com/ Sign up for the Film Series Mailing List: http://zeitgeistmovie.com/ This is the Official Online (Youtube) Release of "Zeitgeist: Moving Forward" by Peter Joseph. [30 subtitles ADDED!] On Jan. 15th, 2011, "Zeitgeist: Moving Forward" was released theatrically to sold out crowds in 60 countries; 31 languages; 295 cities and 341 Venues. It has been noted as the largest non-profit independent film release in history. This is a non-commercial work and is available online for free viewing and no restrictions apply to uploading/download/posting/linking - as long as no money is exchanged. A Free DVD Torrent of the full 2 hr and 42 min film in 30 languages is also made available through the main website [below], with instructions on how one can download and burn the movie to DVD themselves. His other films are also freely available in this format. Website: http://www.zeitgeistmovingforward.com http://www.zeitgeistmovie.com SUPPORT PETER JOSEPH (DONATIONS): http://zeitgeistmovie.com/torrents.html Release Map: http://zeitgeistmovingforward.com/zmap DVD: http://zeitgeistmovie.com/order.html Movement: http://www.thezeitgeistmovement.com Subtitles provided by Linguistic Team International: http://forum.linguisticteam.org/
Views: 25025745 TZMOfficialChannel
America's Missing Children Documentary
 
30:12
A missing person is a person who has disappeared for usually unknown reasons. Missing persons' photographs may be posted on bulletin boards, milk cartons, postcards, and websites, along with a phone number to be contacted if a sighting has been made. People disappear for many reasons. Some individuals choose to disappear alone; most of these soon return. Reasons for non-identification may include: To escape child abuse, such as child physical abuse, emotional abuse, by a parent(s) / guardian(s) / sibling(s) (especially). Leaving home to live somewhere else under a new identity. Becoming the victim of kidnapping. Abduction (of a minor) by a non-custodial parent or other relative. Seizure by government officials without due process of law. Suicide in a remote location or under an assumed name (to spare their families the suicide at home, or to allow their deaths to be eventually declared in absentia). Victim of murder (body disguised, destroyed, or hidden). Mental illness or other ailments such as Alzheimer's Disease can cause someone to become lost, or they may not know how to identify themselves due to long term memory loss that causes them to forget where they live, the identity of family members or relatives or even their own names. Death by natural causes (disease) or accident far from home without identification. Disappearance in order to take advantage of better employment or living conditions elsewhere. Sold into slavery, serfdom, sexual servitude, or other unfree labour. To avoid discovery of a crime or apprehension by law-enforcement authorities. (See also failure to appear). Joining a cult or other religious organization. To escape domestic abuse. To avoid war or persecution during a genocide. To escape famine or natural disaster. By the end of 2005, there were 109,531 active missing person records according to the US Department of Justice. Children under the age of 18 account for 58,081 (53.03%) of the records and 11,868 (10.84%) were for young adults between the ages of 18 and 20. During 2005, 834,536 entries were made into the National Crime Information Center's missing person file, which was an increase of 0.51% from the 830,325 entered in 2004. Missing Person records that were cleared or canceled during the same period totaled 844,838. The reasons for these removals include: a law enforcement agency located the subject, the individual returned home, or the record had to be removed by the entering agency due to a determination that the record is invalid. A common misconception is that a person must be absent for at least 24 hours before being legally classed as missing, but this is rarely the case; in instances where there is evidence of violence or of an unusual absence, law enforcement agencies often stress the importance of beginning an investigation promptly. In most common law jurisdictions a missing person can be declared dead in absentia (or "legally dead") after seven years. This time frame may be reduced in certain cases, such as deaths in major battles or mass disasters such as the September 11, 2001 attacks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_children
Views: 94868 The Film Archives
Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise: Richard Linklater Interview, Filmmaking Education
 
01:00:45
Richard Stuart Linklater (born July 30, 1960) is an American film director and screenwriter. Link to his films: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=cfba0a5be829430d5bb8b95af3ad0fbc&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=richard%20linklater Linklater was born in Houston, Texas. He studied at Sam Houston State University and left midway through his stint in college to work on an off-shore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. While working on the rig he read a lot of literature, but on land he developed a love of film through repeated visits to a repertory theater in Houston. It was at this point that Linklater realized he wanted to be a filmmaker. After his job on the oil rig, Linklater used the money he had saved to buy a Super-8 camera, a projector, and some editing equipment, and moved to Austin. It was there that the aspiring cineaste founded the Austin Film Society and grew to appreciate such auteurs as Robert Bresson, Yasujiro Ozu, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Josef Von Sternberg, and Carl Theodor Dreyer. He enrolled in Austin Community College in the fall of 1984 to study film. Since his early 20s, Linklater has been a vegetarian. Linklater founded the Austin Film Society in 1985 together with his frequent collaborator Lee Daniel, and is lauded for launching and solidifying the city of Austin as a hub for independent filmmaking. Inspiration for Linklater's work was largely based on his experience with the film Raging Bull, Linklater told Robert K. Elder in an interview for The Film That Changed My Life. It made me see movies as a potential outlet for what I was thinking about and hoping to express. At that point I was an unformed artist. At that moment, something was simmering in me, but Raging Bull brought it to a boil. For several years, Linklater made many short films that were, more than anything, exercises and experiments in film techniques. He finally completed his first feature, the rarely seen It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (which is now available in the Criterion Collection edition of Slacker), a Super-8 feature that took a year to shoot and another year to edit. The film is significant in the sense that it establishes most of Linklater's preoccupations. The film has his trademark style of minimal camera movements and lack of narrative, while it examines the theme of traveling with no real particular direction in mind. These idiosyncrasies would be explored in greater detail in future projects. To this end Linklater created Detour Filmproduction (an homage to the 1945 low budget film noir by Edgar G. Ulmer), and subsequently made Slacker for only $23,000. The film is an aimless day in the life of the city of Austin, Texas showcasing its more eccentric characters. In 1995, Linklater won the Silver Bear for Best Director for the film Before Sunrise at the 45th Berlin International Film Festival. While gaining a cult following for his independent films, such as Dazed and Confused, Waking Life, and A Scanner Darkly, his mainstream comedies, School of Rock and the remake of Bad News Bears, have gained him wider recognition. In 2003, he wrote and directed a pilot for HBO with Rodney Rothman called $5.15/hr, about several minimum wage restaurant workers. The pilot deals with themes later examined in Fast Food Nation. In 2004, the British television network Channel 4 produced a major documentary about Linklater, in which the filmmaker frankly discussed the personal and philosophical ideas behind his films. "St Richard of Austin" was presented by Ben Lewis and directed by Irshad Ashraf and broadcast on Channel 4 in December 2004 in the UK. In 2005, Linklater was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for his film Before Sunset. Many of Linklater's films take place in one day, a narrative approach that has gained popularity in recent years. Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Tape, Before Sunrise, and Before Sunset are examples of this method. Two of his recent films, (A Scanner Darkly and Waking Life), used rotoscoping animation techniques. Working with Bob Sabiston and Sabiston's program Rotoshop to create this effect, Linklater shot and edited both movies completely as live action features, then employed a team of artists to 'trace over' individual frames. The result is a distinctive 'semi-real' quality, praised by such critics as Roger Ebert (in the case of Waking Life) as being original and well-suited to the aims of the film. Fast Food Nation (2006) is an adaptation of the best selling book that examines the local and global influence of the United States fast food industry. The film was entered into the 2006 Cannes Film Festival before being released in North America on 17 November 2006 and in Europe on 23 March 2007. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Linklater
Views: 186993 The Film Archives
893 Act Like Our True Great Self, Multi-subtitles
 
01:33:56
★EdenRules/伊甸園/Vườn Địa Đàng : http://edenrules.com/ ★Subscribe/訂閱/Đăng Ký : http://edenrules.com/index.php?route=newsletter/mynewsletter 清海無上師簡介 為了那一點點愛,我們上天下地探索,只為尋獲那一點點愛, 將此愛與眾生分享,無論他們在世上哪個角落。 —— 清海無上師 在無數與清海無上師相遇的人眼中,無上師可說是「愛」的化身! 她是一位知名的慈善家、藝術家和靈性導師。她的愛心和奉獻超越文化與種族的藩籬,嘉惠世界各地數以百萬計的人們。其中包括:窮困的人、醫學研究機構、孤苦的老人、身心障礙者、難民,以及遭受地震、水患等受難者,只要人們有需求,她便無私地奉獻所有。 經由這些善舉,我們見證「源源不絕的慈悲心」正是這位深具愛心女士的標誌。而「世界會」會員,也依循著她的愛心典範,成長茁壯。 清海無上師出生於悠樂中部。小時候,她總是盡其所能地幫助醫院裏的病人和窮苦的人。長大後,她到歐洲留學,擔任義務護理人員,以及為紅十字會翻譯。很快地,清海無上師便發現,痛苦存在於所有文化和世界上每個角落。因此,找尋解除這些苦難的方法,成為她生活中最重要的目標。 清海無上師曾與一位德國醫生結婚,過著幸福美滿的婚姻生活。儘管「分離」對他們來說,是個極為困難的抉擇,然而為了無上師高雅的理想,她的先生最後還是同意分離。隨後,清海無上師便展開靈性追尋之旅。 經過一段漫長旅程,最後,她在印度喜馬拉雅山的深山裡,找到一位開悟的明師,傳授她「觀音法門」——觀內在光和音的打坐法門。經過一段時間的精進修行之後,她達到完全證悟的境界。 “你必須把時間留給自己,往內靜思、回歸自己的本性,記起自己內在的本質,並發展它,讓自己像個藝術家般閒情逸致、滿懷愛心、沒有壓力,然後你才能給予。如果你不了解快樂,你就無法給予快樂;如果你沒有和平,你就無法給予和平。 —— 清海無上師 離開喜馬拉雅山後不久,在眾人的誠摯懇求下,清海無上師將「觀音法門」傳授給渴求真理的人們,鼓勵求道者往內找尋自己偉大的品質。 社會各階層的人士,經由修行「觀音法門」後,發現他們生活更滿足、平靜,充滿喜悅。隨後,美國、歐洲、亞洲、南美洲以及聯合國,均邀請清海無上師蒞臨演講,並傳授「觀音法門」。 “我們能分享什麼就開始分享,然後就可以感受到內在的微細變化,我們的意識會注入更多的愛力,這就是一個起步。我們來到這裡是為了學習成長,也為了學習使用我們無限的愛力和創造力,讓我們所處的任何環境變得更好!" —— 清海無上師 清海無上師本身是一位善行義舉的典範,同時她也鼓勵大家美化我們所居住的世界。 經由修行觀音法門,清海無上師發展出多樣渾然天成的才華,透過繪畫、音樂、詩作、珠寶和服裝設計等藝術創作,將來自天國的靈思融入生活之中。 1995年,在大眾的懇求下,首度在國際各流行重鎮,展開服裝設計巡迴展,其中包括倫敦、巴黎、米蘭和紐約等地。清海師父用這些藝術創作的收入從事慈善工作,以獨立的資金來源展現她的務實觀--我們都應該靠自己的力量幫助他人。 雖然清海無上師不追求外界的認可,但世界各國的官方和私人組織,為表揚她的無我奉獻,在諸多場合頒發給她各式獎項,包括:「世界和平獎」、「顧氏和平獎」、「世界精神領袖獎」、「世界公民人道獎」以及服務大眾傑出人士和提升人權方面的獎章。 她以愛心消弭世上的仇恨,她為絕望的人帶來希望, 她以寛容化解誤會,她散發出偉人光芒, 她是全人類的慈悲天使。 —— 前夏威夷檀香山市長花士先生 清海無上師是當代致力於幫助他人發現及創造美好未來的人士之一。如同許多歷史上的偉人一樣,無上師也有她自己的夢想: 我有一個夢想 我夢想全世界和平 我夢想世界不再有殺生,小孩們可以過著和諧安樂的生活 我夢想國際間能彼此握手言和、互相保護、互相幫助 我夢想這個幾千百萬億年愛心造就的美麗的星球不會被摧毀 我夢想它將會在和平、美麗與愛中延續下去
Calling All Cars: The Flaming Tick of Death / The Crimson Riddle / The Cockeyed Killer
 
01:27:53
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 131747 Remember This
Suspense: Summer Night / Deep Into Darkness / Yellow Wallpaper
 
01:30:48
Psychological thriller: In which (until the often violent resolution) the conflict between the main characters is mental and emotional, rather than physical. Characters, either by accident or their own curiousness, are dragged into a dangerous conflict or situation that they are not prepared to resolve. Characters are not reliant on physical strength to overcome their brutish enemies, but rather are reliant on their mental resources, whether it be by battling wits with a formidable opponent or by battling for equilibrium in the character's own mind. At times, the characters attempt solving, or are involved in, a mystery. The suspense created by psychological thrillers often comes from two or more characters preying upon one another's minds, either by playing deceptive games with the other or by merely trying to demolish the other's mental state.[37] The Alfred Hitchcock films Suspicion, Shadow of a Doubt, and Strangers on a Train and David Lynch's bizarre and influential Blue Velvet are notable examples of the type, as are The Talented Mr. Ripley, The Machinist, Don't Say A Word,[38] House of 9, Trapped, Flightplan, Shutter Island, Secret Window, Identity, Red Eye,[39] Phone Booth, Psycho, The River Wild,[40] Nick of Time,[41] P2,[42] Breakdown, Panic Room,[43] Misery, Straw Dogs and its remake, Cape Fear, The Collector, Frailty,[44] The Good Son and Funny Games.[45] Spy thriller: In which the protagonist is generally a government agent who must take violent action against agents of a rival government or (in recent years) terrorists. The subgenre usually deals with the subject of fictional espionage in a realistic way (such as the adaptations of John Le Carré). It is a significant aspect of British cinema,[46] with leading British directors such as Alfred Hitchcock and Carol Reed making notable contributions and many films set in the British Secret Service. The spy film usually fuses the action and science fiction genres, however, some spy films fall safely in the action genre rather than thriller (e.i. James Bond), especially those having frequent shootouts, car chases and such (see the spy entry in the subgenres of action film).[47] Thrillers within this subgenre include Spy Game, Hanna, Traitor, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, The Tourist, The Parallax View, The Tailor of Panama, Taken, Unknown, The Recruit, The Debt, The Good Shepherd and Three Days of the Condor.[3] Supernatural thriller: In which the film brings in an otherworldly element (such as fantasy and/or the supernatural) mixed with tension, suspense and plot twists. Sometimes the protagonist and/or villain has some psychic ability and superpowers. Examples include, Lady in the Water, Fallen,[48] Frequency, Next, Knowing, In Dreams,[49] Flatliners, Jacob's Ladder, Chronicle,[50] The Skeleton Key,[51] What Lies Beneath, Unbreakable, The Gift,[52] and The Dead Zone. Techno thriller: A suspense film in which the manipulation of sophisticated technology plays a prominent part. There is a bit of action and science fiction.[53] Examples include The Thirteenth Floor, Jurassic Park, I, Robot, Eagle Eye, Hackers, The Net, Futureworld, eXistenZ and Virtuosity. Legal thriller: A suspense film in which in which the major characters are lawyers and their employees. The system of justice itself is always a major part of these works, at times almost functioning as one of the characters. Examples include, The Pelican Brief, Presumed Innocent, The Jury, The Kappa File, The Lincoln Lawyer, Hostile Witness and Silent Witness. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thriller_%28genre%29
Views: 144617 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Ice House Murder / John Doe Number 71 / The Turk Burglars
 
01:27:53
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 159774 Remember This
Kent Hovind - Seminar 4 - Lies in the textbooks [MULTISUBS]
 
02:47:47
Creation Seminar 4: Lies in the Textbooks by Dr. Kent Hovind WITH SUBTITLES: Afrikaans, Bulgarian, Chinese_CS, Chinese_CT, Croatian, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Hebrew, Indonesian, Latvian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish Dr. Hovind shows how public school textbooks are permeated with fraudulent information in order to convince students that evolution is true. Topics included: the geologic column, the Grand Canyon, vestigial organs, the deception of Haeckel's embryonic research, DNA, and many more. Enjoy this point-by-point, entertaining demonstration of scientific evidence used to shed light on each of the lies still being pushed upon our culture. Learn active steps you can take to impact your public school system! No ratings enabled because truth is not based on majority opinion.
Views: 74722 Didymus Didymus
Words at War: Assignment USA / The Weeping Wood / Science at War
 
01:27:26
The Detroit Race Riot broke out in Detroit, Michigan in June 20, 1943, and lasted for three days before Federal troops restored order. The rioting between blacks and whites began on Belle Isle on June 20, 1943 and continued until the 22nd of June, killing 34, wounding 433, and destroying property valued at $2 million. In the summer of 1943, in the midst of World War II, tensions between blacks and whites in Detroit were escalating. Detroit's population had grown by 350,000 people since the war began. The booming defense industries brought in large numbers of people with high wages and very little available housing. 50,000 blacks had recently arrived along with 300,000 whites, mostly from rural Appalachia and Southern States.[2] Recruiters convinced blacks as well as whites in the South to come up North by promising them higher wages in the new war factories. Believing that they had found a promised land, blacks began to move up North in larger numbers. However, upon arriving in Detroit, blacks found that the northern bigotry was just as bad as that they left behind in the deep South. They were excluded from all public housing except Brewster Housing Projects, forced to live in homes without indoor plumbing, and paid rents two to three times higher than families in white districts. They also faced discrimination from the public and unfair treatment by the Detroit Police Department.[3] In addition, Southern whites brought their traditional bigotry with them as both races head up North, adding serious racial tensions to the area. Job-seekers arrived in such large numbers in Detroit that it was impossible to house them all. Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government was concerned about providing housing for the workers who were beginning to pour into the area. On June 4, 1941, the Detroit Housing Commission approved two sites for defense housing projects--one for whites, one for blacks. The site originally selected by the commission for black workers was in a predominantly black area, but the U.S. government chose a site at Nevada and Fenelon streets, an all-white neighborhood. To complete this, a project named Sojourner Truth was launched in the memory of a black Civil War woman and poet. Despite this, the white neighborhoods opposed having blacks moving next to their homes, meaning no tenants were to be built. On January, 20, 1942, Washington DC informed the Housing Commission that the Sojourner Truth project would be for whites and another would be selected for blacks. But when a suitable site for blacks could not be found, Washington housing authorities agreed to allow blacks into the finished homes. This was set on February 28, 1942.[4] In February 27, 1942, 120 whites went on protest vowing they would keep any black homeowners out of their sight in response to the project. By the end of the day, it had grown to more than 1,200, most of them were armed. Things went so badly that two blacks in a car attempted to run over the protesters picket line which led to a clash between white and black groups. Despite the mounting opposition from whites, black families moved into the project at the end of April. To prevent a riot, Detroit Mayor Edward Jeffries ordered the Detroit Police Department and state troops to keep the peace during that move. Over 1,100 city and state police officers and 1,600 Michigan National Guard troops were mobilized and sent to the area around Nevada and Fenelon street to guard six African-American families who moved into the Sojourner Truth Homes. Thanks to the presence of the guard, there were no further racial problems for the blacks who moved into this federal housing project. Eventually, 168 black families moved into these homes.[5] Despite no casualties in the project, the fear was about to explode a year later.[6] In early June 1943, three weeks before the riot, Packard Motor Car Company promoted three blacks to work next to whites in the assembly lines. This promotion caused 25,000 whites to walk off the job, effectively slowing down the critical war production. It was clear that whites didn't mind that blacks worked in the same plant but refused to work side-by-side with them. During the protest, a voice with a Southern accent shouted in the loudspeaker, "I'd rather see Hitler and Hirohito win than work next to a nigger". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_Race_Riot_%281943%29
Views: 289839 Remember This
Red Tea Detox
 
01:20:32
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Dragnet: Homicide / The Werewolf / Homicide
 
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Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday's deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring." (Dunning, 210) Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough's death in 1951 (and therefore Romero's, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode "The Big Sorrow"), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 - April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero's nephew, April 17, 1952 - May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode "The Big Donation"); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top-rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives' personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) "Underplaying is still acting", Webb told Time. "We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee." (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans. Most of the later episodes were entitled "The Big _____", where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in "The Big Streetcar" the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect. Throughout the series' radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode "James Vickers", the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at "the road to San Pedro", clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(series)
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The Great Gildersleeve: Fishing at Grass Lake / Bronco the Broker / Sadie Hawkins Dance
 
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Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
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