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Cryptography: The Science of Making and Breaking Codes
 
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There are lots of different ways to encrypt a message, from early, simple ciphers to the famous Enigma machine. But it’s tough to make a code truly unbreakable. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, John Szymakowski, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz, David Campos, and Chris Peters. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: http://www.vectorsite.net/ttcode_04.html#m3 http://www.simonsingh.net/The_Black_Chamber/crackingprinciple.html http://book.itep.ru/depository/crypto/Cryptography_history.pdf http://www.cs.trincoll.edu/~crypto/historical/gronsfeld.html http://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/vpns/history-encryption-730 http://ftp.stmarys-ca.edu/jsauerbe/m10s11/chapter5.pdf http://www.turing.org.uk/scrapbook/ww2.html http://enigma.louisedade.co.uk/howitworks.html http://www.codesandciphers.org.uk/enigma/example1.htm http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/military/how-enigma-works.html http://www.cs.miami.edu/~burt/learning/Csc609.051/notes/02.html
Views: 777666 SciShow
The Caesar cipher | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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Brit explains the Caesar cipher, the first popular substitution cipher, and shows how it was broken with "frequency analysis" Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/polyalphabetic-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/intro-to-cryptography?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 588986 Khan Academy
Cryptography: Crash Course Computer Science #33
 
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Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Allan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park attempted to decrypt messages from Nazi Enigma machines, and this need has only grown as more and more information sensitive tasks are completed on our computers. So today, we’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure. Note: In October of 2017, researchers released a viable hack against WPA2, known as KRACK Attack, which uses AES to ensure secure communication between computers and network routers. The problem isn't with AES, which is provably secure, but with the communication protocol between router and computer. In order to set up secure communication, the computer and router have to agree through what's called a "handshake". If this handshake is interrupted in just the right way, an attacker can cause the handshake to fault to an insecure state and reveal critical information which makes the connection insecure. As is often the case with these situations, the problem is with an implementation, not the secure algorithm itself. Our friends over at Computerphile have a great video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYtvjijATa4 Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 176818 CrashCourse
Cryptography Basically
 
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This is a video version of a lesson I used for my kids on the basics of cryptography. Hopefully it will be useful for others, either for teaching their kids, or just for a fun approach to the topic. The subject today is the One Time Pad. A later video will cover other techniques, like shared key and public key cryptography. If you want to play with the one time pad, I've put together a simple page to do so: http://www.snoyman.com/static/onetimepad/vue.html And if you have ideas for future videos, please feel free to leave them in the comments.
Views: 1268 Michael Snoyman
Affine Cipher Encryption
 
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gcd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=WA4nP-iPYKE Decryption: http://youtu.be/XFxFPBKFVe8
Views: 21101 Theoretically
Asymmetric encryption - Simply explained
 
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How does public-key cryptography work? What is a private key and a public key? Why is asymmetric encryption different from symmetric encryption? I'll explain all of these in plain English! 🐦 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog: https://www.savjee.be 👍🏻 Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/savjee
Cryptography and privacy. An easy explanation on how to create a key for encryption.
 
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Cryptography is the base for most of our communications online. It's what keeps your messages and your activities private. In this video we explain how cryptography encodes your message using a key and exactly how this key works.
Views: 8248 MinuteVideos
What is Cryptography - Introduction to Cryptography - Lesson 1
 
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In this video I explain the fundamental concepts of cryptography. Encryption, decryption, plaintext, cipher text, and keys. Learn Math Tutorials Bookstore http://amzn.to/1HdY8vm Donate - http://bit.ly/19AHMvX
Views: 88256 Learn Math Tutorials
Cryptography basics: What is Encryption and Decryption
 
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Get Full Course: http://www.engineeringmentor.com/CNYTv3 Networks #3: This tutorial introduces the Cryptography basics. It also explains what is Encryption and Decryption. a) Cryptography basics (00:21):http://youtu.be/BEb_AnPWPwY?t=21s how do we provide this security during transmission? Well, One way of ensuring security can be use of CRYPTOGRAPHY! Cryptography is a field of network security which deals with hiding "real" infromation when it is under transmission between the two parties. Usually, the real information is transformed or hidden into another message and transmitted over the network. This transformed message in itself will make no sense even if any hacker gets hold of this information. When it reaches the destination, the receipent will know a method to de-transform the garbage message into the original information which the sender had sent.method of transforming message at sender's side and de transforming at reciever's side forms the basic model of Cryptography. b) Encryption and Decryption (3:57):http://youtu.be/BEb_AnPWPwY?t=3m57s First, the information to be transmitted, called as plain text(or message) is fed to an Encryption system. The Encyrption system uses a key to convert the plain text to encyrpted form which looks like garbage value. This is also called as cipher text. A corresponding key is used at the other end to decrypt the cipher text back to original message. When we say a key, it actually means a piece of string value which is fed to encyprtion and decryption algorithms along with the text for transformation. When the message reaches the destination, this system at the other end decrypts the cipher text into original message with the help of the key. This is called as Decryption System. The output of the Decryption System is the intended message. Depending on how the keys are shared, we can classify crytography as symmetric and asymmetric. If the keys used by both parties are same, then it is called symmetric key cryptography, or private key cryptography. If both parties use different keys for encyrption and decryption, then it is called asymmetric key cryptography or public key cryptography. video URL : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEb_AnPWPwY Watch ALL CN VIDEOS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9OIoIp8YySF4mkIihOb_j2HZIRIlYuEx For more, visit http://www.EngineeringMentor.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EngineeringMentor Twitter : https://twitter.com/Engi_Mentor
Views: 96997 Skill Gurukul
Intro to Cryptology for kids: the science of making and breaking codes.
 
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*********************************************************************** Submit Secret Word: https://goo.gl/forms/e8H0rV8afWJp7pEi2 *********************************************************************** Printable Cryptography Wheels: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1buvUzXaY5sDwB_SALgMaSREm6C099UFh/view?usp=sharing *********************************************************************** What is cryptology? How it’s applied today? Cryptography provides a natural way to get students to discover certain key mathematical concepts and techniques on their own. Codes have been used for centuries and children are fascinated by intrigue and adventure. In this video I’ll show you the Enigma decoding machine, Navajo codes and different cryptographic techniques. Also you can take a look at the National Cryptologic museum in Maryland (USA). My video from USA Science & Engineering Festival: Day 2 https://youtu.be/M6JcmPFE_Cw Day 1 https://youtu.be/43zpoqrxxc4 ======================================================= Music: Griphop by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100413 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 784 zakUak
Key Exchange
 
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This clip from the 2008 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures shows a simple demonstration of how two people can agree on a secret key, even though all of their communications are carried out in public. In the electronic world, secret key exchange allows computers to communicate securely, and is used, for example, when you give your credit card information to an on-line shop. You can watch the 2008 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures in full at: http://research.microsoft.com/~cmbishop or by visiting the Royal Institution web site. There is a dedicated web site to accompany the 2008 Christmas Lectures, with ten interactive games as well as downloadable PDF instructions for experiments which can be conducted at home or at school: http://www.rigb.org/christmaslectures08
Views: 138108 ProfChrisBishop
Pig Pen Code
 
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Pig pen code - Showing how to cipher pig pen code
Views: 16552 4aRainyDay
Cool Codes for Kids: The Pigpen Cypher
 
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Dan Metcalf, author if Codebusters, gives you the lowdown on codes, ciphers and puzzles you can try at home. What do you do when you want all your writing to be secret? You use a code of course. You could use a substitution code like the Caesar shift, but you can just as easily use a code that substitutes letters for shapes. This is what the Freemasons did a few hundred years ago when they invented the Pigpen cypher! To start, you need a key – use two grids like this – the 'pigpen' – and fill in the alphabet. The second grids have dots in them so you can tell them apart from the first ones. Then you take the individual shape of the letter you wish to replace and copy it down. Then the decoder just needs to match the shapes to their key. Nifty, huh? Try this yourself!
Views: 1210 Dan Metcalf Writer
Encryption as Fast As Possible
 
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How does data travel around the internet without becoming publicly visible? Encryption! But what is encryption?... Massdrop link: http://dro.ps/techquickie
Views: 396360 Techquickie
How asymmetric (public key) encryption works
 
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Easy explanation of "public key encryption". Instead of the usual terms of "public key" and "private key" this tutorial uses "lock" and "key". ================================================== If you want to start protecting you email: get free Privacy Everywhere Beta, http://www.privacyeverywhere.net/
Views: 200375 Veet Vivarto
Cryptography Lesson #1 - Block Ciphers
 
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This tutorial video will help provide an understanding of what block ciphers are, and how they are used in the field of cryptography.
Views: 121623 Ryan Kral
How to Create a Coded Message - Zig Zag Method - Secret Code - Step by Step Instructions
 
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The coded message is simple to make and hard to crack. The coded message is a jumble of letters, but hidden inside is the secret message. Watch the video for all the details. Once you know the encoding method it is easy to read. Your friend will need to know the coding method (i.e. The Zig Zag Method) prior to sending the coded message, so they will be able to decode this message.
Cryptography Explained: Public-Key vs Symmetric Cryptography
 
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Our "Cryptography Explained" video breaks down how cryptography works in blockchain and highlight the differences between public-key cryptography vs. symmetric cryptography. Cryptography is the method of disguising and revealing information, through complex mathematics. Any piece of information can be encrypted, making it impossible to read, except for by the intended recipient. 👩‍🎓👨‍🎓Learn blockchain fast at the Lisk Academy: https://lisk.io/academy Thanks for watching! Lisk makes it easy for developers to build and deploy blockchain applications in JavaScript. Learn about the leading platform for world-changing dapps at https://lisk.io/products. 🗞Read our latest news on the Lisk Blog: https://blog.lisk.io/ 💼 Check our current job openings! https://angel.co/lisk 👚👕 Lisk t-shirts now available: https://merch.lisk.io/ 👩‍🚀👨‍🚀 Meet the team: https://lisk.io/team 🔒 Store your LSK in our official wallet: https://github.com/LiskHQ/lisk-hub/releases/latest 🔎 View our blockchain explorer: https://explorer.lisk.io/ 🎥 For media inquiries, please email us at press [at] lisk [dot] io. 👫Join our community channels: Reddit: http://reddit.com/r/lisk Twitter: http://twitter.com/liskhq Telegram: https://t.me/Lisk_HQ Lisk.chat: https://lisk.chat/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/liskhq Facebook: http://facebook.com/liskhq LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/lisk/ 👨‍💻👩‍💻 For developers: GitHub: https://github.com/LiskHQ Gitter: https://gitter.im/LiskHQ/lisk Documentation: https://lisk.io/documentation
Views: 3014 Lisk
Caesar Cipher
 
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This tutorial will teach you how to encrypt and decrypt messages using the Caesar Cipher.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 123959 Lacey Wright
Playfair Cipher Explained
 
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An animated attempt of explaining the Playfair cipher. This tutorial includes rules of the cipher followed by an example to clear things up. This was a part of my final year project to create a learning aid. I decided to upload this so the animation won't go to waste. All feedbacks welcome. Special thanks to Olivia Beck for creating the background image
Views: 164266 Kenny Luminko
What is cryptography? | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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What is Cryptography? A story which takes us from Caesar to Claude Shannon. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/caesar-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/algorithms/intro-to-algorithms/v/what-are-algorithms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 785286 Khan Academy
Let's make secret codes
 
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Send secret messages in an easy way using this powerful technique! Music: Origin by Electric Joy Ride https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iScT5IfgG-Q Krys Talk & Cole Sipe - Way Back Home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrmc7KVIoKQ&list=UU_aEa8K-EOJ3D6gOs7HcyNg
Views: 23341 Techstremely Good
The Enigma Machine Explained
 
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As technology increases, so do the methods of encryption and decryption we have at our disposal. World War II saw wide use of various codes from substitution ciphers to employing Navajo code talkers in the Pacific theater. Here, science journalist and author Simon Singh demonstrates the German enigma machine, a typewriter-like device used to encrypt communications. He demonstrates not only its operation, but both the strength and fatal flaws in its method. Watch the Full Program Here: https://youtu.be/nVVF8dgKC38 Original Program Date: June 4, 2011 The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest
Views: 435763 World Science Festival
How to make Cipher Wheel
 
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Check out the full article at http://www.stemlittleexplorers.com/en/how-to-make-cipher-wheel/ In this video, you will learn how to make Cipher Wheel or Cipher Disc which you can use to encrypt your messages that only people you choose can decipher. All you need is some Cardboard, Scissors, Ruler, Felt pen, Pen, Pin, Divider and Colored pencils. Also, great if you have a Protractor. Ciphering your message is simple: You rotate smaller disc for X places in Y direction. Then look at the letters from a bigger circle and write the letters from the smaller circle. Now you have coded message. A person who wants to decode the message needs to have the same Cipher wheel. You only need to tell him X places and Y direction and he can then align Cipher accordingly. Now that person reads letters from the smaller circle and writes the letters from the bigger circle. This is a great STEM Technology activity that Kids can use to learn coding and patterns. They will love it because the activity is mystical and secretive. Also, it's great for learning letters. Visit us at http://www.stemlittleexplorers.com And follow us at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/stemlittleexplorers/ Twitter https://twitter.com/Explorers_STEM Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/STEM_Little_Explorers/ Authors: Vedran Leder & Iva Erceg Music: "Porch Swing Days - faster" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 4532 STEM Little Explorers
Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
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Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 438287 itfreetraining
Visual Cryptography
 
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Hiding your images in style since 1994. Copyright Protection Scheme for Digital Images Using Visual Cryptography and Sampling Methods Ching-Sheng Hsu Young-Chang Hou July 2005 RIT, IMGS-362 Image Processing & Computer Vision II
Views: 25517 Matt Donato
What is the Caesar Cipher?
 
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This week we learn about the basics of cryptography, using one of the oldest and simplest ciphers. Follow us on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/OccamAnswers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Occams-Answers-1609580059112636/ Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/occamsanswers/ ------------------------------------------ Unlike the Caesar salad, the Caesar cipher is named after the Caesar you’d expect. A cipher is simply a reversible technique for encrypting a message. The message is obscured in some way, so that if it is intercepted during communication, it cannot be read by the interceptor. Every cipher has a key, some piece of information that allows the intended recipient to reverse the encryption and decipher the message. A good cipher is only decipherable using the key, even if the interceptor knows how the cipher works. In fact, cryptographers generally follow Kerckhoffs’ principle, which states that the cipher should be secure even if the method of encryption is public knowledge. The Caesar cipher is essentially the method of encryption a child with a decoder ring would use. Each letter of the alphabet is assigned a replacement letter, which is always a fixed number of places before or after it in the alphabet. This assignment is cyclical, so that if every letter is replaced by the letter 3 places after it in the alphabet (a left shift of 3) then the letter B in the message would be replaced by the letter E, and the letter Z would be replaced by the letter C. The key in a Caesar cipher is the number of places left or right that the letters of the message were shifted. The recipient uses this knowledge to shift the letters of the encrypted message back, in order to read the original message. This left shift of 3 was the key Julius Caesar himself used to convey important military messages to his generals. As you may have guessed, the Caesar cipher is not particularly secure, because the encrypted message can be easily deciphered by brute-force: trying different keys until a sensible message results. Those familiar with cryptogram puzzles, which are encrypted using a variation of this method, will know that the frequency of letter usage can provide further assistance in deciphering the message. For example, the most common letter in the English language is E, so it is likely that the letter which appears most often in the encrypted message represents the letter E. Caesar himself may not have been concerned with the security of this cipher, as the method was relatively unknown at the time, and most of his enemies were not highly literate. In today’s world, however, the Caesar cipher can be solved in seconds by computer programs, and therefore should never be used to encrypt sensitive information. In fact, a variation of the Caesar cipher used by mafia boss Bernardo Provenzano led to his arrest in 2006 when police intercepted and immediately deciphered one of his messages. Although useless by itself, the Caesar cipher still plays a role in cryptography as part of more complex and less easily cracked ciphers, such as the Vigenere cipher. And of course, due to its very simplicity, the Caesar cipher remains vital in teaching children about puzzles and codes and in teaching students about the basics of cryptography.
Views: 431 Occam's Answers
Encryption and HUGE numbers - Numberphile
 
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Banks, Facebook, Twitter and Google use epic numbers - based on prime factors - to keep our Internet secrets. This is RSA public-key encryption. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Gold Vault: https://youtu.be/CTtf5s2HFkA This video features Dr James Grime (http://singingbanana.com/). Message from James: "Thanks to Dr Chris Hughes of the University of York who showed me how to find the RSA public key from my browser, and showed me how awesome they look when you print them out." Regarding the keys used for encryption: x, y prime Encode key E shares no factors with (x-1)(y-1) Decode key is D with E*D - 1 a multiple of (x-1)(y-1) Thanks to Drew Mokris for the animation: http://www.spinnerdisc.com/ NUMBERPHILE Website: http://www.numberphile.com/ Numberphile on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/numberphile Numberphile tweets: https://twitter.com/numberphile Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Numberphile_Sub Videos by Brady Haran Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile Brady's videos subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/BradyHaran/ Brady's latest videos across all channels: http://www.bradyharanblog.com/ Sign up for (occasional) emails: http://eepurl.com/YdjL9 Numberphile T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/numberphile Other merchandise: https://store.dftba.com/collections/numberphile
Views: 1001331 Numberphile
The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy
 
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Here's something I wrote a few weeks ago and I've been spreading around, and encouraging others to do so as well. The formatted version I put on my DeviantArt journal is linked to below, and I've provided the raw text as well; feel free to copy it and spread it around anywhere you think it'll do good--especially to politicians. The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy by shanedk on DeviantArt http://shanedk.deviantart.com/journal/The-Ten-Commandments-of-Encryption-Policy-634133886 So many politicians, bureaucrats, and pundits are proposing weakening our crypto to allow searches by law enforcement without understanding the issue, so I thought it'd be good to have a quick reference to explain why this is a bad idea. Feel free to copy this and send to politicians, news reporters, or anyone else you think needs to know this. The Ten Commandments of Encryption Policy 1. In "Applied Cryptography" (2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1996), Bruce Schneier wrote: "There are two kinds of cryptography in this world: cryptography that will stop your kid sister from reading your files, and cryptography that will stop major governments from reading your files." Therefore, anything that allows our government to read our messages will automatically put our crypto into the "kid sister" category. 2. Anything that allows government to read your message will also allow hackers to read your message. Cryptography is just math, and math works the same for everybody. It doesn't distinguish between good people and bad, or who has a warrant and who doesn't. 3. When strong crypto is outlawed, only outlaws will have strong crypto. The encryption genie is already out of its mathematical bottle. Weakening our crypto so our governments can read it will only make us vulnerable to hacker groups and terror organizations like ISIS, who will have no hesitation about breaking the law to use strong crypto themselves. 4. "If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to worry about" is a very dangerous mantra. Just ask anyone who's had their identity stolen. 5. When people talk about giving law enforcement authorities access to our data, remember that they're talking about the same law enforcement authorities who illegally tapped Martin Luther King Jr.’s phones. 6. Terror attacks, mass shootings, and mass hackings are all proof that we cannot rely on laws to protect us. We need to protect ourselves with math. Protecting our data is too important to be left to governments. 7. Always remember that lawmakers want solutions that are visible, that they can point to and say, "See? It works." But security solutions that ACTUALLY work are invisible. People go about their lives unaware of the attacks they were protected from. People don't notice the days their house DOESN'T get burgled. 8. Don't be caught up in considering how much security you "need." You won't know how much that is until after the worst happens and it's too late. We need to be able to give ourselves every last bit of security that we can. 9. Before you bring up the founders or the Constitution, remember that they themselves often communicated using ciphers. Thomas Jefferson even invented a wheel cipher for this purpose. 10. We need to consider the consequences of constant observation. Every bit of human progress began as an idea that most people opposed. The last thing we want to do is make people afraid to express those ideas.
Views: 762 Shane Killian
How To Write in Pigpen Cipher [2 MINUTE TUTORIAL]
 
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Pigpen cipher - also known as masonic cipher, Freemason's cipher, Napoleon cipher, and tic-tac-toe cipher - is a geometric substitution cipher based off of 4 grids. If you enjoyed this pigpen cipher tutorial, please do remember to subscribe - it really helps me out. Buy my artwork / check out my website here: https://www.buzzymartin.co.uk Follow me on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/buzzymartin
Views: 22390 Buzzy Martin
Creating An Unbreakable Cipher (nearly)
 
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Creating Ciphers can be fun, but understanding how they work by using a simple example of developing a cipher is a great way to understand them. This video covers the development of a cipher algorithm and shows how to make it (nearly) unbreakable.
Null Cipher Code
 
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Deane shows how to use a simple code to send secret messages. SUBSCRIBE NOW http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=CuriosityShow CONNECT WITH CURIOSITY Facebook ➤ http://www.facebook.com/CuriosityShow Twitter ➤ https://twitter.com/CuriosityShow Curiosity Show ➤ www.curiosityshow.com.au
Views: 9618 CuriosityShow
Vigenere Cipher 1
 
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Encrypt the message MAKE IT HAPPEN using the Vigenėre cipher and key word MATH.
Views: 134449 MathAfterMath
How To Decode A Message With An ATBASH Cipher [CODE CRACKING 101]
 
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http://royalorderoftheholymackerel.com/ WANT TO JOIN THE SOCIETY? CLICK THE LINK BELOW! http://royalorderoftheholymackerel.com/new_members/ DOWNLOAD AND PRINT YOUR FREE ATBASH CIPHER DISK! https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9b4jkHYFD5AeTdwY2FyTVU1OUk/edit?usp=sharing DOWNLOAD AND PRINT YOUR FREE DECODER DISK #3! https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9b4jkHYFD5AanB5Q08tbklYMTQ/edit?usp=sharing DOWNLOAD AND PRINT YOUR FREE "THREE LETTERS BACK" CAESAR CIPHER! https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9b4jkHYFD5AWjBNUnZVX3JuYmM/edit?usp=sharing SUPPORT THE SHOW AND UNLOCK COOL BONUS CONTENT ON PATREON! http://www.patreon.com/RoyalOrderoftheHolyMackerel MEMBERSHIP KITS, INVISIBLE INK PENS, MEMBER'S JOURNAL BINDERS, AND DECODER RINGS ARE NOW AVAILABLE IN THE STORES!! http://roothm.storenvy.com/ http://www.zazzle.com/roothm JOIN THE FISHERS OF TRUTH NEWSLETTER http://eepurl.com/TXpbn SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST ON iTUNES https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/royal-order-holy-mackerel/id855579169 OUR PREVIOUS MEETING http://youtu.be/NpmXQV6q9Ug ------------------ Welcome to Code Cracking 101! In this episode I explain how to use an ATBASH cipher to decode the secret messages hidden in episodes 7 - 13 (and beyond) of Gravity Falls. ------------------ SEND LETTERS, FAN MAIL, AND POSTCARDS TO Douglas MacKrell P.O.Box 6529 Astoria, NY 11106 SEND EMAILS TO [email protected] JOIN THE SOCIETY Website http://royalorderoftheholymackerel.com/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/theroyalorderoftheholymackerel Twitter https://twitter.com/DouglasMacKrell Tumblr http://theroyalorderoftheholymackerel.tumblr.com/ Instagram http://instagram.com/douglasmackrell G+ https://www.google.com/+BigMacKrell ----------------- MORE INFORMATION ON GRAVITY FALLS http://disneychannel.disney.com/gravity-falls http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_Falls http://gravityfalls.wikia.com/wiki/Gravity_Falls_Wiki MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ATBASH CIPHER http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atbash Cipher Challenge: Atbash cipher http://youtu.be/EksD3QHkkRE atbash http://youtu.be/t4Z0eVVZDPk The Hidden Meaning of END OF THE WORLD http://youtu.be/W96lFus0JRo ------------- In this meeting of Code Cracking 101, I break down the Atbash Cipher. The ATBASH cipher actually got it's start in Hebrew text - notably in Jewish Mysticism, as it's used in translations of their religious books. The name itself is is actually an acronym of four Hebrew letters: Aleph-Tav-Beth-Shin (אתבש). The way the Atbash Cipher works is by mirroring the alphabet. By writing A to Z on a piece of paper and Z to A just below it, you've crafted an Atbash Cipher! This means that if you decode one letter B=Y, you've decoded the reverse as well Y=B. Due to the low difficulty of this encryption method, it's not often used in situations where data must remain secure - but it does make a great way to casually encode messages between friends! http://wp.me/a4aWg3-8H
Views: 54561 Secret Screening
Cryptography
 
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Cryptic messages, carrier pigeons, secret codes words. Cryptography used to be cool.
Views: 39234 WhatYouOughtToKnow
Cryptography 101 -- Homophonic Ciphers
 
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Quick video on Homophonic Ciphers. More Crypto 101: ADFGVX - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5-ory-Z25g XOR - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xK_SqWG9w-Y Pigpen - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUlIvx0fgV8 Homophonic Cipher - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB_3fcO8G24 Vigenère Cipher - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzizXgWGjcM Cracking Substitution Ciphers - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p99Wo_rr7OA Caesar shift and Atbash - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbcYLI_3mNA Support me on Patreon if you are into that - https://www.patreon.com/laingsoft
Views: 2213 Charles Laing
Prime Numbers & Public Key Cryptography
 
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A simple explanation of how prime numbers are used in Public Key Cryptography from ABC1 science program Catalyst
Views: 59891 Simon Pampena
#6 cryptographic primitives - encryption ciphers
 
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- symmetric - asymmetric - stream ciphers - CBC mode Exercise: combining cryptographic primitives to solve a specific problem.
Views: 251 ralienpp
Scytale Cipher
 
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This video shows how to use everyday items to create a Scytale Cipher, a GREAT idea for use in breakoutedu activities or other engaging classroom activities. Featured in this Trojan Horse Escape Room!!!! https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Escape-Room-Trojan-Horse-3335045
Views: 5776 Mary Howard
Chapter 2, part 4: Crypto Basics --- VENONA, codebook cipher, Zimmerman telegram
 
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Information Security: Principles and Practice, 2nd edition, by Mark Stamp Chapter 2: Crypto Basics Sections 2.3.6-2.3.7 VENONA, codebook cipher, Zimmerman telegram Class Lecture, 2011
Views: 7596 Mark Stamp
Asymmetry -- The Cryptographic Game Changer
 
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The most impactful innovation in cryptography in the last half century is the notion of asymmetry: using different keys for encryption and decryption, and finding the mathematics that would make it difficult (so we assume) for our adversary to derive one key from the other. The essence of this game changing innovation is described in this video.
Views: 1268 Gideon Samid
Cryptography 101 -- Pigpen cipher
 
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Another quick video on Pigpen ciphers. More Crypto 101: ADFGVX - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5-ory-Z25g XOR - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xK_SqWG9w-Y Pigpen - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUlIvx0fgV8 Homophonic Cipher - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB_3fcO8G24 Vigenère Cipher - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzizXgWGjcM Cracking Substitution Ciphers - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p99Wo_rr7OA Caesar shift and Atbash - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbcYLI_3mNA Support me on Patreon if you are into that - https://www.patreon.com/laingsoft
Views: 608 Charles Laing
Public key cryptography - Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (full version)
 
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The history behind public key cryptography & the Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm. We also have a video on RSA here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8
Views: 600460 Art of the Problem
Cryptography 101 - The Basics
 
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In this video we cover basic terminology in cryptography, including what is a ciphertext, plaintext, keys, public key crypto, and private key crypto.
Views: 271444 Pico Cetef
Unplugged: The show. Part 9: Public key encryption
 
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This video shows an entertaining way to introduce Computer Science to school students. For the next part, see http://nz.youtube.com/watch?v=iDVH3oCTc2c For the first part in the series, see http://nz.youtube.com/watch?v=voqghyZbZxo The full show is available in one clip at http://nz.youtube.com/watch?v=VpDDPWVn5-Q For more information, see http://csunplugged.org
Thingumy & Bob, "Kid's Code & Cipher"
 
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Get the song for free on thingumyandbob.bandcamp.com http://www.facebook.com/thingumyandbob http://www.farfrommoscow.com/artists/thingumy-bob.html
Views: 285 thingumyplusbob
DEF CON 23 - Eijah - Crypto for Hackers
 
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Hacking is hard. It takes passion, dedication, and an unwavering attention to detail. Hacking requires a breadth of knowledge spread across many domains. We need to have experience with different platforms, operating systems, software packages, tools, programming languages, and technology trends. Being overly deficient in any one of these areas can add hours to our hack, or even worse, bring us total failure. And while all of these things are important for a well-rounded hacker, one of the key areas that is often overlooked is cryptography. In an era dominated by security breaches, an understanding of encryption and hashing algorithms provides a tremendous advantage. We can better hone our attack vectors, especially when looking for security holes. A few years ago I released the first Blu-Ray device key, AA856A1BA814AB99FFDEBA6AEFBE1C04, by exploiting a vulnerability in an implementation of the AACS protocol. As hacks go, it was a simple one. But it was the knowledge of crypto that made it all possible. This presentation is an overview of the most common crypto routines helpful to hackers. We'll review the strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm, which ones to embrace, and which ones to avoid. You'll get C++ code examples, high-level wrapper classes, and an open-source library that implements all the algorithms. We'll even talk about creative ways to merge algorithms to further increase entropy and key strength. If you've ever wanted to learn how crypto can give you an advantage as a hacker, then this talk is for you. With this information you'll be able to maximize your hacks and better protect your personal data. Speaker Bio: Eijah is the founder of demonsaw, a secure and anonymous content sharing platform, and a Senior Programmer at a world-renowned game development studio. He has over 15 years of software development and IT Security experience. His career has covered a broad range of Internet and mid-range technologies, core security, and system architecture. Eijah has been a faculty member at multiple colleges, has spoken about security and development at conferences, and holds a master’s degree in Computer Science. Eijah is an active member of the hacking community and is an avid proponent of Internet freedom.
Views: 47607 DEFCONConference

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