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Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
 
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Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 52146 The Economist
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea
 
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Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release. ----------------------------------------­­---------------------------------------­-­---------------- Next Animation Studio’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D news animations that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health. Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's news animations at http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com/trial/ To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit: http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com
Views: 30468 News Direct
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush
 
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Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 63742 Al Jazeera English
Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
Seabed Mining Concern in Ba 1
 
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Hear the plight of the landowners along the Ba river. Seabed mining exploration machineries already in position ready to dredged the river where most villagers fetched their livelihood from.Is justice served to these poor natives?
Views: 711 Leca Vunibobo
SEABED MINING
 
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The impacts of seabed mining.
Views: 438 GreenhouseCartoons
Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals
 
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British scientists have announced what they are calling an "astonishing" discovery deep in the Atlantic Ocean. They found that an underwater mountain near the Canary Islands holds some of the richest deposits of rare minerals anywhere on Earth.
Views: 161 Tyler News
The Truth On Sea Bed Mining by Prof. Chalapan Kaluwin _2.wmv
 
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Interview with Professor Chalapan Kaluwin - Environment & Conservation University of Papua New Guinea
Sea bed mining  scraping the bottom of the barrel
 
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Out feature story this week takes us on a rather sobering underwater expedition into the dark world of seabed phosphate mining. The deep ocean floor, admittedly, is not a habitat we generally give much thought to. But in mankind’s quest for resources and mineral wealth, companies have now turned to this relatively unexplored region, and its phosphates they’re after, a resource in relatively limited supply on Earth. Is the supply of phosphates really so limited that it’s worth scraping our ocean bed completely bare? With our global seas, sea life and climate already in serious trouble, this action certainly seems like a bridge too far. Bertus went to see if he could get to the bottom of this matter.
Views: 285 5050 Community
Advanced subsea diamnond mining vessel goes to work
 
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Designed by Marin Teknikk and built by Kleven Verft, Norway, the US$157 million vessel will enable Debmarine Namibia, a 50/50 joint venture between the Government of the Republic of Namibia and De Beers Group, to explore diamond deposits and secure diamond supply in the country well into the future
Views: 4416 marinelogcom
Scientists fear deep-sea mining
 
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Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 6225 euronews Knowledge
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 2217 Inhabitants
Exploring Our Sea Floor Production Equipment and How It Will Work
 
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Join us as we highlight our sea floor production vessels and show and describe how our first location, Solwara1, will work. This video is full of information and explores in's and out's of how all of our equipment will work together to mine the sea floor.
Views: 2735 Nautilus Minerals
WHY KARKAR SAID NO TO EXPERIMENTAL SEABED MINING
 
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The government of Papua New Guinea initially planned to build the world'd first seabed mining between the water of Karkar and Bagabag Island of Madang Province. However, The people of Karkar and Bagabag Islands understood the important connection they have to the sea and said no to seabed mining in their waters.
Views: 140 BRG Films
Seabed mining in New Zealand
 
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The Government is set on opening New Zealand coasts for seabed mining. This has been mandated without public consultation or conversation, and may have devastating consequences, as well as offering little economic benefit. Gareth Hughes discusses the David and Goliath courtroom battles and scientific background with community group KASM.
Views: 530 NZ Green Party
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
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The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1973629 The Economist
Sea Bed Mining
 
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TVWAN News 10th April 2017 - Sea Bed Mining
Views: 26 TVWAN
Cardinal Sir John Ribat speaks out against experimental seabed mining
 
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The world's first project to mine the seabed for minerals is expected to begin operations in Papua New Guinea in 2019. Experimental in nature, this mining ventured by Canadian company Nautilus Minerals is in charge of the Solwara 1 project located in the Bismarck Sea (approximately 30 kilometers from the coast of New Ireland and 50 kilometers from the coast of East New Britain. There have been reports of impacts from exploratory mining in the area affecting indigenous coastal communities of the Bismarck Sea. In this Voices from the Last Frontier documentary, His Eminence, Cardinal Sir John Ribat calls for a ban on experimental seabed mining in PNG and the Pacific. He challenges us to be responsible stewards to protect our common home. For more information about the Voices from the Last Frontier series, email: [email protected]
Views: 129 PANG Media
Ban seabed mining the Top End
 
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Just like taking a bulldozer to the sea floor, destructive seabed mining threatens our Top End coasts and lifestyle. It has never been allowed before in Australia, but we know that there are many locations across the Territory coast where seabed mining has already been approved or where applications to mine exist. Destructive seabed mining would decimate our marine life, pollute our waters, threaten our fishing and destroy sites of cultural significance. Sign the petition asking the Gunner Government to ban seabed mining for good. Sign the petition - https://www.topendcoasts.org.au/seabed_mining_no_way
DAVID RASTOVICH & ZEN WALLIS TALK ABOUT SEA BED MINING PROPOSALS IN NZ on Vimeo
 
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Sea bed mining could be a major threat to the well being of the west coast of the north island of New Zealand. It has the potential to negatively affect surf breaks but even more significantly, could wipe out fish species especially the endangered 'Maui Dolphins'.
TVWAN News - No to sea Bed Mining
 
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Archbishop of Port Moresby Archdiocese, his eminence Cardinal John Ribat has made his stance clear on the deep sea Mining issue. He said the Catholic Church is against that type of mining because it will cause destruction to the surrounding environment. Furthermore it does not solve the Climate Change issue.
Views: 395 TVWAN
Legal Pathways for Addressing Environmental Harm in Deep Seabed Mining Activities
 
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Everyone is aware of off-shore oil rigs; these platforms drill down underwater for valuable resources just off the coast of many nations. But, deep in the ocean beyond national aquatic boundaries lies an abundance of natural resources such as gold, copper, manganese and zinc. State-sponsored companies are surveying and staking claim to these resources, but so far, no one has been granted approval to begin extracting them. The International Seabed Authority (ISA) — the governing body that oversees all activities in international waters (known as the Area) — is currently developing regulations for the extraction of marine minerals. Rules and procedures that govern liability for damage arising from mining activities will be crucial aspect of this regulatory framework. Who is responsible when an environmental disaster occurs as a result of mining activities? To assist in clarifying these legal issues of responsibility and liability, the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), the Commonwealth Secretariat and the Secretariat of the International Seabed Authority established the Liability Issues for Deep Seabed Mining project. Under the direction of Neil Craik (CIGI), Hannah Lily (Commonwealth Secretariat) and Alfonso Ascencio-Herrera (ISA Secretariat), this project seeks to provide a foundational understanding of key questions surrounding the further development of liability rules.
Sea mining could destroy underwater Lost City
 
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Scientists believe life on earth may have begun in a place called ‘The Lost City’, deep beneath the mid Atlantic ocean. But now a United Nations agency has assigned this part of the seabed to Poland for mining exploration purposes. But scientists say that miners may inadvertently destroy precious species and geological structures in their quest for minerals. Sky’s Economics Editor Ed Conway reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-N... iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n... Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de...
Views: 1663 Sky News
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
 
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DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
Views: 585 Love Science
Experimental Seabed Mining _Coming to a Coastline Near YOU!
 
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'Experimental Seabed Mining-Coming to a Coastline Near You' explains the inevitable destruction the Seabed Mining would bring to the environment and the people's lives. A 2-minute campaign video by Act Now and PANG to collect support regionally and internationally to Ban Seabed Mining.
Views: 92 BRG Films
Scientific Deep Sea Drilling and Coring Technology
 
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The video shows scientific ocean drilling and coring technology. Scientific Deep Sea Drilling Vessel CHIKYU is the state-of-the-art research vessel exploring the deep earth by sampling, measuring and monitoring operated by JAMSTEC. The Earth deep below the seafloor contains a unique record of our planet's evolution and structure. Scientists study the sub-seafloor to better understand Earth's components, history, and phenomena. This research helps us answer questions about fundamental aspects of our planet such as the environment, the biosphere, solid earth cycles, and geodynamics. 00:00 The process of deep sea drilling 04:04 Rotary drilling 05:23 Riser drilling system 07:30 Coring procedure 10:38 Core sample processing More about the research vessel CHIKYU, http://www.jamstec.go.jp/chikyu/ (C) JAMSTEC
Views: 915153 jamstecchannel
Sea Bed Mining   Papua New Guinea
 
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Stop Sea Bed Mining in Papua New Guinea.
Views: 582 PNGFACTS
Dave Rastovich - NO SEABED MINING (www.surf-devil.com)
 
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More infos at http://www.surf-devil.com/de/forum.html?func=view&catid=24&id=9677#9677
Views: 3491 www.Surf-Devil.com
NZ Government Seabed Mining Agenda Exposed
 
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NZ Government Seabed Mining Agenda Exposed! Phil McCabe http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/show-archives/nz-government-seabed-mining-agenda-exposed-phil-mccabe Phil McGabe www.kasm.org.nz After opening up New Zealand's regional parks for mining, The government realised that harvesting minerals from the sea floor is the new game in town. International momentum and attention from businesses and government have spurred this move, Currently, there are many countries looking at programs for exploitation. New Zealand holds the 5th largest marine estate in the world, Up to 200 Nautical Miles away from the land is marked as it's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Accounting for roughly 1% of the planet's surface, So the potential mining interests and associated risks are voluminous to say the least. New Zealand isn't the first country to "OK" Seabed mining, In the case of Papua New Guinea, The Community didn’t know about it, Until AFTER they’d already consented. And the process for approval here, isn't exactly above water either, so to speak. READ MORE: http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/show-archives/nz-government-seabed-mining-agenda-exposed-phil-mccabe Cheers guys for reading this all the way to the end, If you do donate or contact them, let em know it came from The Vinny Eastwood Show :) Just want you to know I'm 100% listener funded, it takes a lot of work to organise, edit, upload and share these interviews by myself, so I do hope you consider flicking a few dollars a month my way via automatic payment. NZ Gifts And AP's Kiwibank: 38-9010-0455296-00 Name: GUERILLA MEDIA or through patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4321806 If you do donate (or already have) send me your facebook name at https://www.facebook.com/VinnyEastwoodShow/?ref=hl and I'll add you to the secret and EXCLUSIVE Vinny Eastwood Donors group, Plus, you'll get early access to brand new episodes before they're made public! Thank you so much for supporting me all these years everyone :) Vinny Eastwood MR NEWS home page www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com Youtube Channel: wwwyoutube.com/c/vinnyeastwoodnz
Views: 975 Vinny Eastwood
LEGASEA SEABED MINING
 
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The Ocean plays a huge part in our great Kiwi lifestyle. Kiwis Against Seabed Mining need your help to protect our Ocean from Seabed Mining. Join us and make your submission NOW - http://kasm.org.nz/submission Check out more epic fishing action at: http://www.ultimatefishing.tv
Views: 987 Ultimate Fishing
PNG DEEP SEA MINING BBC NEWS AT TEN
 
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Plans for the world's first deep sea mine are taking shape in the waters off Papua New Guinea. The ocean floor is rich in gold, copper and other minerals in big demand around the world. But some scientists warn that digging up the seabed will destroy marine life, and Sir David Attenborough is among those objecting. BBC News science editor David Shukman reports.
Views: 2787 David Shukman
Seabed Mining - Nautilus Minerals CEO Mike Johnston talks to Global Island News
 
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Nautilus Minerals CEO, Mike Johnston, talks of the opportunity that seafloor mining provides to secure high quality minerals at lower cost, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to terrestrial mines, to meet increasing demand.
Views: 2046 Global Island News
DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining
 
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Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461
Views: 300 Yeagerbr
Sustainable Seabed Mining: A New Concept For Atlantis II Deep
 
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Research on seabed exploitation and seabed mining is a complex transdisciplinary field that demands for further attention and development. Since the field links engineering, economics, environmental, legal and supply chain research, it demands for research from a systems point of view. This implies the application of a holistic sustainability framework of to analyse the feasibility of engineering systems. The research at hand aims to close this gap by developing such a framework and providing a review of seabed resources. Based on this review it identifies a significant potential for massive sulphides in inactive hydrothermal vents and sediments to solve global resource scarcities. The research aims to provide background on seabed exploitation and to apply a holistic systems engineering approach to develop general guidelines for sustainable seabed mining of polymetallic sulphides and a new concept and solutions for the Atlantis II Deep deposit in the Red Sea. The research methodology adpted will start with acquiring a broader academic and industrial view on sustainable seabed mining through online survey and expert interviews on seabed mining. The experts are chosen according to their knowledge in one or more of the dimensions of seabed mining introduced in the research framework. The Nautilus Minerals case is also reviewd for lessons learned for seabed mining and the presented concept in particular with identification of challaenges and issues. Therafter, a new concept and site specific assessment for Atlantis II Deep is developed. The research undertaken in this study provides a new perspective regarding the sustainable seabed mining. The main contributions of this research are the development of extensive guidelines for key issues in sustainable seabed mining as well as a new concept for seabed mining involving engineering systems, environmental impact, economical benefits, logistics chain supply and legal aspects.
Views: 4520 Dr Hany Elosta
Mining at the Bottom of the Bering Sea During an Arctic Winter | Gold Divers
 
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With The summer season over, 3 teams of miners dive under the ice to dredge gold on the floor of the Bering Sea. Subscribe to Discovery TV for more great clips: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=DiscoveryTV Follow Discovery on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DiscoveryUK
Views: 288617 Discovery UK
24,000 Petitioned Against Sea Bed Mining
 
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A petition containing twenty four thousand signatures to stop the Solwara-1 deep-sea mining project was handed over to the government yesterday.
Views: 472 EMTV Online
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!
 
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Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
Views: 7075 Seas At Risk
tracks on sea bed mining machine
 
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Description this is the machine that created all those tracks on the sea bed, follow the tracks from the machine, these tracks are aprox, two miles wide and there's more.
Views: 148 harry pace
Experimental Seabed Mining and China Marine Industrial Zone in the Madang Province-Papua New Guinea
 
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Mining, Fishing and Logging Projects all taking place in the Madang Province, Papua New Guinea under the name of development and yet, no 'development-like' changes have taken place in the Province and country as a whole. Sumkar MP Ken Fareweather speaks of how disgusted he is that decisions about Projects like the Canada Experimental Seabed Mining and the China Marine Indsutrial Zone bypasses him and other Madang MPs by the Ministers in Port Moresby
Views: 433 Rachel Shisei
Seabed Mining Goldrush
 
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“We are now seeing this happening in a number of places where they’re thinking of taking off the entire crust, which would basically devastate and destroy the whole ecosystem,” Mr Carl-Gustaf Lundin, IUCN You can view this video and the full video archive on the Dukascopy TV page: http://www.dukascopy.com/tv/en/#184901 Смотрите Dukascopy TV на вашем языке: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvrussian 用您的语言观看杜高斯贝电视: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvchinese Miren Dukascopy TV en su idioma: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvspanish Schauen Sie Dukascopy TV in Ihrer Sprache: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvgerman Regardez la Dukascopy TV dans votre langue: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvfrench Veja a TV Dukascopy na sua língua: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvpt
Views: 576 Dukascopy TV (EN)
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific
 
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The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
Views: 1275 Pulitzer Center
Kiwis Against Seabed Mining
 
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filmed in Aotearoa New Zealand 2005
Views: 787 freddychur
Calls for a Moratorium on Sea bed mining
 
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Pacific civil society organisations today launched a legal opinion against Deep sea Mining.
Views: 86 EMTV Online
Green's marine sanctuary could end seabed mining plans: RNZ Checkpoint
 
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The Green Party's plans to create New Zealand's largest ever marine sanctuary off the Taranaki coast could put an end to a seabed mining proposal before it even gets going. Robin Martin reports.
Views: 168 RNZ
Ocean Minerals & Deep Sea Mining
 
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Deep Sea Mining opens up a number of opportunities for countries to get their hands on rare and useful ocean minerals. But is Deep Sea Mining safe, or will it cause more harm to the ocean floors? Watch to find out.. 1:38-1:46 Source :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1koFEKfmLw Music Credits : - Under Water - Silent Partner https://youtu.be/H3m94UQ6rcg - You by myuu https://soundcloud.com/myuu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Music for Creators https://youtu.be/DR9s88XLBf0
Views: 1466 GnY TV
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier
 
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http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to [email protected] http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
Views: 6003 Kitco NEWS
The Amazing Future of Deep Ocean Exploration
 
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Biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, underwater drones, and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification: exploring the future of oceanographic discovery. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos: Mining: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/video/2017/jun/28/robots-ocean-floor-deep-sea-mining-video Sonar mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRQuID0IwbY Microbes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uktdKw_bJ_8 Biofluorescence: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/david-gruber/ Susan Avery TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQIgKyX3oU Triona McGrath TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJPpJhQxaLw Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOIOXvU0_qk James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSfESqX-E84 Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUzz_ilsFa0 Onboard the Okeanos Explorer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0G68ORc8uQ With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier. Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species. This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations. 40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans. But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets. That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how landforms and moves over time. Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man. [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...” In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple. Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium-ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on. But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem. One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.
Views: 31059 The Daily Conversation