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Electrophilic aromatic substitution | Aromatic Compounds | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Electrophilic aromatic substitution. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/aromatic-compounds/reactions-benzene/v/bromination-of-benzene?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/aromatic-compounds/naming-aromatic/v/naming-benzene-derivatives?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 355549 Khan Academy
Tests for the Functional Group Present in the Organic Compounds - MeitY OLabs
 
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This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ For more Information @ http://amrita.olabs.edu.in/?sub=73&brch=8&sim=141&cnt=1 ▶ Amrita Online Lab Project Website http://www.olabs.edu.in/ ▶ Subscribe @ https://www.youtube.com/user/amritacreate ▶ Like us @ https://www.facebook.com/CREATEatAmrita Copyright © 2017 Amrita University Developed by Amrita University & CDAC Mumbai. Funded by MeitY (Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology) Tests for the Functional Group Present in the Organic Compounds :- Molecules of organic compounds except that of hydrocarbons can be divided into two parts, a reactive part which is referred to as functional group and a skeleton of carbon atoms called alkyl group. The properties of a compound are largely determined by the functional group. Different compounds having same functional group have similar properties and are classified as family of compounds, Compounds having different functional groups have different properties and belong to different families of compounds. This video explains how to identify the functional groups present in an organic compound.
Views: 61206 amritacreate
Is it an AROMATIC compound?
 
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How to tell if a ring that has alternating double bonds is actually aromatic. Aromatic molecules are perfectly flat and have delocalised pi-electrons that circulate around in the ring. You can use the Huckel Rule (4n+2) to determine if it's aromatic, or just count the number of double bonds ... if it's an odd number, it's aromatic!
Views: 135219 chemistNATE
Determining Aromaticity Sample Problems Part 2 Organic Chemistry
 
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Visit our website for the notes of this lecture: https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/ Get private tutoring from anywhere in the world, via your computer, from this instructor. He offers help in Organic Chemistry, General Chemistry, Physics, MCAT, PCAT, and DAT. SUBMIT AN MCAT PROBLEM AND I WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO SOLVE IT VIA VIDEO. FREE. VISIT WEBSITE FOR DETAILS. https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/
Views: 2940 Knowbee
Flame Tests for Unknowns
 
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Students use flame tests to identify unknown metal ions. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 132183 FlinnScientific
Aromatic 6. Preparation of benzene diazonium chloride.
 
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Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry In this video I prepare a sample of benzene diazonium chloride (phenyl diazonium chloride) and discuss the chemistry behind it. I also demonstrate two examples of its coupling reactions - with phenol and then with beta napthol.
Views: 7989 FranklyChemistry
Benzoic Acid Identification Test   Organic Compounds
 
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Benzoic acid /bɛnˈzoʊ.ɪk/, C₇H₆O₂, is a colorless crystalline solid and a simple aromatic carboxylic acid. The name is derived from gum benzoin, which was for a long time its only known source.
Phenol Identification Test   Organic Compounds
 
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Phenol, also known as carbolic acid, is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C₆H₅OH. It is a white crystalline solid that is volatile. The molecule consists of a phenyl group bonded to a hydroxyl group.
GCE Organic Chemistry - Aliphatic Tests - Combustion.
 
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Highly Recommended - Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry Comparing the combustion reactions of different families of organic compounds
Views: 4846 FranklyChemistry
Calculating Aromatic C Shifts (NKU)
 
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A video explaining the ability to calculate nmr C shifts in an aromatic ring used in organic lab at NKU
Views: 370 Brad Sieve
Tests for Phenols  - MeitY OLabs
 
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This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ For more Information @ http://amrita.olabs.co.in/?sub=73&brch=8&sim=141&cnt=1 ▶ Amrita Online Lab Project website http://www.olabs.edu.in/ ▶ Subscribe @ https://www.youtube.com/user/amritacreate http://www.youtube.com/amritavlab ▶ Like us @ https://www.facebook.com/CREATEatAmrita Copyright © 2016 Amrita University Developed by Amrita University & CDAC Mumbai. Funded by MeitY (Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology) Tests for Phenols :- Phenols are compounds containing one or more hydroxyl group attached to an aromatic ring. The simplest phenol is carbolic acid having the formula C6H5OH. It is a white crystalline solid. Other example are o,m and p-cresols, catechol and resorcinol. This video explains how to identify phenol using some simple tests.
Views: 65932 amritacreate
Aromatic
 
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Determining if a species is Aromatic (ring, sp2 hybridized, flat/planar, and Huckel's rule), Antiaromatic (no Huckel's rule), or Nonaromatic. How to apply Huckel's rule for a few examples. Note: Sorry for the shaky camera.
Views: 10783 EnderlePhD
Identifying unknown organic compounds: solubility, functional group and spectra tests.
 
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Dr Barbie Panther looks at how to identify unknown organic chemical compounds using solubility tests, functional group tests and spectra.
Views: 24506 FedUni CLIPP
Organic Chemistry:  Identifying Unknown Organic Compounds Flame Test
 
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Dr Barbie Panther looks at how to identify unknown organic chemical compounds using the flame test.
Views: 3918 FedUni CLIPP
Thin Layer Chromatography: Analgesics
 
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Chem2700 Organic Chemistry I Lab TLC analysis of pain killers. Not wearing goggles! Bad me!!
Views: 24843 uofgchem2700
Melting Point of an Organic Compound - MeitY OLabs
 
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This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ For more Information @ http://amrita.olabs.co.in/?sub=73&brch=7&sim=33&cnt=1 ▶ Online Labs for School lab Experiments (Olabs) http://www.olabs.edu.in/ ▶ Learn more about Amrita University http://www.amrita.edu ▶ Subscribe @ http://www.youtube.com/amritacreate https://www.facebook.com/onlinelabs Copyright © 2013 Amrita University Developed by CDAC Mumbai & Amrita University under research grant from Department of IT, Government of India Melting Point of an Organic Compound :- The melting point is an important physical property of a compound. The melting point can be used to identify a substance and as an indication of its purity. A pure crystalline compound usually possesses a sharp melting point and it melts completely over a narrow range of temperature of not more that 0.5 -1 °C. The presence of even small amount of impurities usually produces a depression in the freezing points and shows a marked increase in the width of the melting point range. The melting point range of greater than 5 °C indicates that the substance is impure. For a material whose identity is known, an estimate of degree of purity can be made by comparing its melting point with that of a pure sample. This video explains how to determine the melting point of an organic compound.
Views: 65393 amritacreate
Chemistry Lab Experiment:- To determine Anniline Point of lubricant
 
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This video is prepared by my students, to show method to find out the aniline point of a lubricant. It is the minimum temperature at which the lubricant is miscible with the equal volume of aniline. It shows the aromatic content of the lubricating oil. Hence, greater the Aniline point, lesser would be the aromatic content and better is the lubricant .
Views: 3799 Neha Patni
Aromatic stability IV | Aromatic Compounds | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Aromaticity of the cyclopentadienyl anion and cycloheptatrienyl cation. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/aromatic-compounds/aromatic-stability/v/aromatic-stability-v?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/aromatic-compounds/aromatic-stability/v/aromatic-stability-iii?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Aromatic NonAromatic AntiAromatic
 
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What classifies a compound as aromatic, nonaromatic, or antiaromatic? Examples and rules.
Aromatics and Cyclic Compounds - Crash Course Chemistry #42
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. What's that smell? Smell's like Organic Chemistry! This week Hank talks about Aromatics and Cyclic Compounds and naming their substituents, resonance as well as common reactions & uses. -- Table of Contents Cyclic Organic Compounds & Naming Their Constituents 1:06 Aromatic Compounds 3:02 Resonance 3:18 Naming Aromatic Compounds 5:05 Common Reactions & Uses 7:24 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 530382 CrashCourse
Antiaromaticity : Huckel's Rule
 
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Antiaromaticity: Huckel's Rule
IR Infrared Spectroscopy Review - 15 Practice Problems - Signal, Shape, Intensity, Functional Groups
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a review of IR Infrared Spectroscopy and how you can use it to distinguish one molecule from another according to their functional groups. This video contains plenty of lecture notes as well as a few multiple choice practice problems that will help you for your next organic chemistry test or exam. Here's the link for the complete video: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/irspectroscopyreview General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5vjCqnVb6s&index=1&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU3gxU8RwqkEET2ilZ80Znj Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics covered in this video: 1. Introduction to IR Spectroscopy 2. Absorption of IR energy - Molecular Vibrations - Stretching, Compression, & Bending 3. Concept of Transmittance and Absorbance 4. Relationship Between Wavelength, Wavenumber cm^-1, Frequency, and Energy 5. Signal Characteristics Shape: Broad vs Sharp 6. Signal Intensity: Weak, Medium, or Strong 7. The effect of hydrogen bonding and bond polarity on signal shape and intensity 8. Diagnostic / Functional Group Region vs Fingerprint Region 9. The Relationship Between The Mass of the Atom and The Wavenumber 10. Relationship Between Bond Strength and Wavenumber 11. The Effect of Conjugation on IR Frequency Absorption 12. IR Spectrum For Alkanes, Alkenes, & Alkynes 13. IR Spectrum of an Internal Alkyne vs a Terminal Alkyne 14. IR Active vs IR Inactive Compounds - Symmetrical & Assymetrical Bonds 15. Electric Field, Force, & Dipole Moments - IR Bond Stretch vs Compression 16. IR Spectrum of a Carboxylic Acid vs an Alcohol - OH Stretch 17. IR Spectrum of Aldehydes & Ketones: C=O Carbonyl Stretch @ 1700 cm^-1 18. IR Graph of Esters and Ethers: C-O Stretch @ 1000 to 1300. Sp2 vs Sp3 Hybridized Carbon 19. IR Graph of Primary and Secondary Amines: Single vs Double Peak at 3300 & 3400 cm^-1 Symmetric and Assymetric Stretching of NH2 Hydrogen Atoms. 20. IR Spectrum of Amides & Nitriles 21. Carbonyl C=O Stretch - Resonance Electron Donating Groups vs Inductive Electron Withdrawing Groups 22. IR Spectrum of Aromatic Benzene Ring Derivatives C=C & =CH Stretch
Liquid-liquid extraction (or separation)
 
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Shows how to go about performing a liquid-liquid extraction using a separating funnel.
Views: 498340 David Read
Organic Practical Setup 10. Steam distillation.
 
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Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry In this video I look at the setup for Steam Distillation and explain its use in purifying liquids by distilling them well below their boiling points. This is useful because some liquids (e.g. phenylamine) begin to decompose when heated to their boiling points. It is one in a series of short videos looking at the main organic practical techniques: heat & distill; reflux distillation; washing and drying in solvent extraction; recrystallisation and melting point determination; and others. Note that the video entitled " boiling water with ice" explains the physical chemistry aspects associated with steam distillation.
Views: 30786 FranklyChemistry
Huckel's rule: aromatic vs. antiaromatic (9)
 
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Organic chemistry: How to use Huckel's Rule to determine whether a molecule is aromatic, antiaromatic, or nonaromatic. These videos are offered on a "pay what you like" basis. You can pay for the use of the videos at my website: http://www.freelance-teacher.com/videos.htm I offer tutoring via Skype. For more information, go to my website. These videos are designed to help students who are finding the material difficult, so I go very slowly, with lots of repetition and examples. If you don't find this material difficult, you might be very bored by these videos and might prefer to learn straight from a textbook. Here is a playlist containing all the videos in this series: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9ZV_t16x0k&feature=PlayList&p=7E15BC16C359C406&index=0&playnext=1 (1) The rule for determining hybridization (2) The rule for determining hybridization, concluded (3) The exception to the rule for determining hybridization (4) What are the valence orbitals of hybridized atoms? (5) "Flat", "cyclic", "completely conjugated" (6) Counting pi electrons (7) Counting pi electrons--harder problems (8) Counting pi electrons--more problems (9) Counting pi electrons--more problems (10) Counting pi electrons--more problems (11) Counting pi electrons--even more problems (12) Counting pi electrons--rings with substituents (13) Counting pi electrons--polycyclics (14) Counting pi electrons--radicals; and a puzzle (15) Counting pi electrons--triple bonds (16) The lesson from triple bonds (17) A deeper look: why do the rules work? (18) A deeper look, continued (19) A deeper look: Why is there an "exception to the rule" for hybridization? (20) A deeper look: Why "flat"? (21) A deeper look: Why "4n+2"? Molecular orbitals (22) Why "4n+2"? Frost diagrams (23) Why "4n+2"? (24) Why "4n+2"? (25) Why "4n+2"? tags: education college student exam test
Views: 11684 freelanceteach
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) & Exposure Risks
 
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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, commonly referred to as PAHs, are a group of chemicals that are formed during the incomplete burning of coal, oil and gas, garbage, or other organic substances like tobacco or charbroiled meat. PAHs are often found as a mixture containing two or more of these compounds. Some PAHs are also manufactured. These pure PAHs usually exist as colorless, white or pale yellow-green solids. PAHs are found in coal tar, crude oil, creosote and roofing tar, and a few are also used in medicines or to make dyes, plastics and pesticides. These chemicals have been found in at least 600 of the 1,430 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). People can be exposed to PAHs by: • Breathing air containing the chemicals in the workplace of coking, coal-tar, and asphalt production plants; smokehouses; and municipal trash incineration facilities. • Breathing air containing PAHs from cigarette smoke, wood smoke, vehicle exhausts, asphalt roads or agricultural burn smoke. • Coming in contact with air, water or soil near hazardous waste sites. • Eating grilled or charred meats; contaminated cereals, flour, bread, vegetables, fruits, meats; and processed or pickled foods. • Drinking contaminated water or milk. • Nursing infants of mothers living near hazardous waste sites may be exposed to PAHs through their mother's milk. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that some PAHs may reasonably be expected to be carcinogens. Some people who have breathed or touched mixtures of PAHs and other chemicals for long periods of time have developed cancer. Some PAHs have caused cancer in laboratory animals when they breathed air containing them (lung cancer), ingested them in food (stomach cancer), or had them applied to their skin (skin cancer). These are just a few things to know about PAHs, to learn more about this or other indoor air quality, environmental, health and safety issues, please visits the websites shown in the video.
Views: 5361 Paul Cochrane
Tests for Carboxylic Acids - MeitY OLabs
 
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This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ For more Information @ http://amrita.olabs.co.in/?sub=73&brch=8&sim=141&cnt=1 ▶ Amrita Online Lab Project website http://www.olabs.edu.in/ ▶ Subscribe @ https://www.youtube.com/user/amritacreate http://www.youtube.com/amritavlab ▶ Like us @ https://www.facebook.com/CREATEatAmrita Copyright © 2016 Amrita University Developed by Amrita University & CDAC Mumbai. Funded by MeitY (Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology) Tests for Carboxylic Acids :- Carboxylic acids are organic compounds containing carboxyl functional group. It is of two types aliphatic and aromatic. Formic acid and acetic acid are the simplest aliphatic acid and benzoic acid is the simplest aromatic acid. The fruits such as lemon, grape, orange and green apple also contain carboxylic acid. This video explains how to identify carboxylic acids using some simple tests.
Views: 59580 amritacreate
Organic Chem Test 3 Lab Reactions for Practical Exam
 
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HOW TO DO THE FOLLOWING PROBLEMS: 2-methyl-3-bromo pentane reaction with magnesium in ether CH3MgBr with a Carbonyl group in a Grignard reaction (anhydrous) A Carbonyl pentane reacting with MgBrCH2CH2CH3 in acidic conditions Calculating percent yield of bromobenzene and Bromo-magnesium-benzene Benzene ring production from Bromobenzene and ethanol
Views: 844 ProfessorAbud
Tests for Amines - MeitY OLabs
 
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This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ For more Information @ http://amrita.olabs.edu.in/?sub=73&brch=8&sim=141&cnt=1 ▶ Amrita Online Lab Project Website http://www.olabs.edu.in/ ▶ Subscribe @ https://www.youtube.com/user/amritacreate ▶ Like us @ https://www.facebook.com/CREATEatAmrita Copyright © 2016 Amrita University Developed by Amrita University & CDAC Mumbai. Funded by MeitY (Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology) Tests for Amines :- Amines are derivatives of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups. When one of the three hydrogen atoms is replaced by alkyl or aryl group, primary amine is formed. When two of the three hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl group, secondary anime is formed. When all the three hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl substituents, tertiary amine is formed. This video explains some simple tests of amines.
Views: 39065 amritacreate
Huckel's Rule: aromatic vs. antiaromatic (13)
 
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Organic chemistry: How to use Huckel's Rule to determine whether a molecule is aromatic, antiaromatic, or nonaromatic. These videos are offered on a "pay what you like" basis. You can pay for the use of the videos at my website: http://www.freelance-teacher.com/videos.htm I offer tutoring via Skype. For more information, go to my website. These videos are designed to help students who are finding the material difficult, so I go very slowly, with lots of repetition and examples. If you don't find this material difficult, you might be very bored by these videos and might prefer to learn straight from a textbook. Here is a playlist containing all the videos in this series: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9ZV_t16x0k&feature=PlayList&p=7E15BC16C359C406&index=0&playnext=1 (1) The rule for determining hybridization (2) The rule for determining hybridization, concluded (3) The exception to the rule for determining hybridization (4) What are the valence orbitals of hybridized atoms? (5) "Flat", "cyclic", "completely conjugated" (6) Counting pi electrons (7) Counting pi electrons--harder problems (8) Counting pi electrons--more problems (9) Counting pi electrons--more problems (10) Counting pi electrons--more problems (11) Counting pi electrons--even more problems (12) Counting pi electrons--rings with substituents (13) Counting pi electrons--polycyclics (14) Counting pi electrons--radicals; and a puzzle (15) Counting pi electrons--triple bonds (16) The lesson from triple bonds (17) A deeper look: why do the rules work? (18) A deeper look, continued (19) A deeper look: Why is there an "exception to the rule" for hybridization? (20) A deeper look: Why "flat"? (21) A deeper look: Why "4n+2"? Molecular orbitals (22) Why "4n+2"? Frost diagrams (23) Why "4n+2"? (24) Why "4n+2"? (25) Why "4n+2"? tags: education college student study test exam
Views: 16577 freelanceteach
#AROMATICITY|| PART-1 || IIT_JAM_ CHEMISTRY || (ORGANIC CHEMISTRY) || HINDI
 
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IN THIS PARTICULAR VIDEO, AROMATICITY IS EXPLAINED.THIS IS THE FIRST LECTURE ABOUT AROMATICITY. IN THIS VIDEO,WHAT IS AROMATICITY, ANTIAROMATICITY, NONAROMATICITY IS EXPLAINED,WITH THE THE HELP OF VARIOUS EXAMPLE ALSO IT TALKS ABOUT A SPECIAL AROMATIC COMPOUND "AZULENE". HETROCYCLIC AROMATICITY IS EXPLAINED,AND ALSO PERIPHERAL AROMATICITY. Follow us on Fb http://www.facebook.com/jamchemistry/ Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/jamchemistry
Views: 13095 IIT JAM CHEMISTRY
A2 Chemistry - Aromatic Synthesis
 
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A video going over some aromatic synthetic routes snazzyscience.net
Views: 164 Medilyfe
Acid Base Titration Curves, pH Calculations, Weak & Strong, Equivalence Point, Chemistry Problems
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic overview / introduction to titrations. It shows you how to calculate the unknown concentration of an acid solution and how to determine the volume of base added to completely neutralize the acid and to reach the equivalence point. It also explains how to calculate the pH of acid base titration experiment before, at and beyond the equivalence point. This video contains plenty of examples, equations, formulas, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Acid Base Titration Stoichiometry 2. How to Calculate the Unknown Concentration of an Acid 3. Dilution Formula - M1V1=M2V2 4. Acid Base Titration Calculations - Volume Required to Reach the Equivalence Point 5. How To Determine The Volume of Base Required to Completely Neutralize The Acid 6. Acid Base Neutralization Reaction 7. Acid Base Titration Curves - pH vs Volume 8. Strong Acid Strong Base Titration Curve - PH is 7 at the Equivalence Point 9. Weak Acid Strong Base Titration Curve - pH is greater than 7 at the equivalence point 10. pH = pKa at one half of the equivalence point 11. How to determine the pKa of a weak acid using titration curves 12. Weak Base Strong Acid Titration Curve 13. HCl and NaOH Titration 14. H2SO4 and NaOH Titration Acid Base Neutralization Reaction - Double Replacement 15. Strong Acid Strong Base Titration Calculations - pH of Solution Before and After The Equivalence Point 16. pH and pOH Calculations 17. How To Determine the pH of a Strong Acid Solution 18. pH of a Strong Base Solution 19. Weak Acid Strong Base Titration - pH Calculations 20. pH of a weak acid solution 21. Ka, [H3O+] and pH Calculations 22. ICE Tables vs BCA Tables 23. ICE Table Units - Molarity - Moles per Liter 24. pH of a weak acid strong base titration before, at and after the equivalence point 25. pH before equivalence point - Buffer Solution 26. Buffer Solutions - pH Calculations - Henderson Hasselbach Equation - Weak Acid and Conjugate Weak Base 27. pKa Calculations From Ka 28. pH at the Equivalence Point - Ice table and BCA table 29. pH of a weak base solution - Kb, Ka, pH, pOH, [H+] and [OH-] Calculations 30. Solving For X Without Using The Quadratic Formula 31. Weak Base Strong Acid Titration Calculations - pH Before, During and Beyond the Equivalence Point 32. Titration Indicators, Color Change and pH Range 33. Phenolpthalein, Methyl Orange, and Bromothymol Blue Indicators
Completing the Reagent Table | Organic Chemistry Lab
 
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Full example of Completing the Reagent Table from Educator.com’s Organic Chemistry class. Want more video examples? Our full lesson includes in-depth explanations with even more worked out examples. ►See the entire syllabus at http://www.educator.com/chemistry/organic-chemistry/starkey/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=SEO&utm_campaign=OCHEMYT In this video, we’ll discuss how to complete the reagent table for prelab. You'll learn how to calculate moles of 2-bromoaniline, NaNO2, and KI. We'll also talk about limiting reagent, molar equivalents, theoretical yield, and actual yield Like other instructors such as lsstarkey, ChemistryConnected, Khan Academy, and freelanceteach? Our Organic Chemistry instructor is pretty awesome too. Dr. Laurie Starkey is also the author of “Introduction to Strategies for Organic Synthesis” (Wiley) and earned her Ph.D. in Chemistry from UCLA. She has been teaching Organic Chemistry at the university level for over 15 years and most recently won the 2013 Provost's Award for Excellence in Teaching, Cal Poly Pomona's highest teaching award. So what are you waiting for? Join over 100K satisfied high school and college students who have aced their classes and exams with http://www.Educator.com’s videos.
Views: 2730 Educator.com
Aromatic Compounds: Aromatic, Non-Aromatic, and Anti-Aromatic
 
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This video is about Aromatic Compounds
Views: 1986 Umer Syed
Are These Aromatic, Anti-Aromatic or Non Aromatic ? (Huckles Rules)
 
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DO NOT FORGET TO SUBSCRIBE! This video focuses on the idea of aromaticity and distinguishing what kind of chemistry will occur between an alkene vs an aromatic compound.
Views: 27 Kevan Science
Aromaticity Lec 1, Organic Chemistry IIT JEE (Aromatic, Anti Aromatic and Non Aromatic compounds)
 
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This is the first part of the lecture for understanding Aromaticity in Organic Chemistry for preparing for JEE, BITS and other engineering exams. The lectures are taught by IITians themselves to help the aspirants. Collegepedia.in is uploading these lectures to help students learn in a better way. Visit collegepedia.in . We are on facebook and twitter as well. For rest of the videos, Check out our channel Collegepedia.in on youtube
Views: 7275 Collegepedia.in
Steps to determine whether a compound is Aromatic,Anti Aromatic or non Aromatic
 
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Steps to determine whether a compound is Aromatic,Anti Aromatic or non Aromatic
Views: 186 Rohit Kumar Singh
Solubility of organic compounds | Structure and bonding | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to predict if a compound dissolves in water. Practice identifying the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of a molecular structure. Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/boiling-points-of-organic-compounds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
361L Thin Layer Chromatography (#6)
 
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An unknown (acetylsalicylic acid, acetaminophen, caffeine, or salicylamide) is determined using thin layer chromatography (TLC).
Views: 4208 eku_chem_lab
Chem 102 Experiment 1
 
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Views: 750 CSUN OChem
361L Bromination of Stilbene (#10)
 
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Stilbene is brominated using pyridinium tribromide. Chemistry lab at Eastern Kentucky University, U.S. www.youtube.com/user/ekuchemlab
Views: 6907 eku_chem_lab
Mod-05 Lec-05 Overview of Structure Determination in Heterocyclic Chemistry
 
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Heterocyclic Chemistry by Prof. D.R. Mal, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, IITKharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 3062 nptelhrd
Functional group analysis of organic chemistry , Practical chemistry, Analytical chemistry
 
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Functional group is a group of atom which determines the properties of any compound. Syllabus of class XII - Solid state , solutions , electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry, polymers, chemistry in Everyday life , biomolecule, general principle of extraction , d&f block elements , coordination compounds, p block elements , Haloalkanes & Haloarenes , Alcohol , Phenols & ethers , Aldehydes & Ketones , carboxylic acids , Nitrogen containing compounds. Syllabus for class 11th- 1. Some basic concept 2. Structure of atom atomic structure 3. Classification and periodic properties 4. Chemical bonding 5. Thermodynamics 6. States of matter 7. Redox reaction 8. Equilibrium 9. Hydrocarbon 10. S block elements 11. P block elements .
Views: 48400 Pradeep Sharma
Search for and synthesis of natural organic compounds with unique structures and functions
 
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The Nakata-Saikawa Research Lab in the Department of Applied Chemistry at Keio University’s Faculty of Science and Technology conducts research on organic chemistry of natural products. Q. The natural world has many mysterious phenomena and ingenious tricks that we would never think of. By synthesizing challengingly complex structured organic compounds, or by explaining the nature of yet to be understood mysterious organic phenomena at the molecular level, we think we can discover new compounds, new properties of compounds, and new organic chemical reactions. The Nakata-Saikawa Research Lab has been conducting synthesis research targeting natural organic compounds with complex and unique structures. As part of this research, during the synthesis of the ansa compound kendomycin, under a new method using the Dotz reaction to form an aromatic core while simultaneously generating a ring, the lab has successfully synthesized abundantly varied ansa compounds that cannot be created in the natural world. Q. Ansa compounds have interesting structures so they are fun to make, and quite a variety of bioactive compounds are produced, so in fact some are used in medicines. Of these, kendomycin is a compound that relatively recently was isolated and had its structure determined. From that time it was being targeted by synthetic chemists. We too have focused on synthesizing kendomycin, which may become a lead compound of pharmaceutical drugs, in an interesting manner. In addition to the synthesis of compounds, the Nakata-Saikawa Research Lab is focused on physiological phenomena and natural phenomena in organisms, conducting research to extract related organic compounds. Among this is research on a chemical substance that causes sneezing. Q. There is a red striped jellyfish called chrysaora pacifica. When it gets caught in a fishing net and turns into a powder after becoming dried out and stale, it has long been said that people will sneeze uncontrollably just by passing by it. What is it that causes the sneezing? It is something that causes everybody to sneeze, so to figure out what it is, we caught some chrysaora pacifica and made it into a powder. Using mice, we are administering a sample in their noses and counting the number of sneezes as a method to discover the inducing substance. At this point it appears that the substance is very unstable. It is not as if we understand its structure yet, but we have started to see that the substance causing the sneezing is something unique, so we think this research has become interesting. In addition, the Nakata-Saikawa Research Lab is also conducting fascinating research to explain the mechanisms of biological phenomena. This includes extracting compounds involved in the phenomenon of the calcium in an egg shell moving to the bones of a chick when the chick grows inside the egg. Q. When you look around there are many interesting natural phenomena. Look at the various things around you and give it some thought as to how in the world they became like that. When you do this, you will discover that there are still many extremely interesting unexplained phenomena. If we continue to work hard researching to explain them, I think we will definitely discover some interesting science, so I want everyone to join the world of science.
Organic Chemistry: Testing for alkenes using bromine water
 
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Top Tutors for all Subjects at all Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry This short video shows how to distinguish between and alkene and alkane using bromine water. Alkenes are unsaturated and decolourise an orange solution of bromine water. Alkanes are saturated and do not react with bromine water, so the orange colour persists.
Views: 60818 FranklyChemistry