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Deep sea mining and it's problems for the environment
 
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Health education support environment
Views: 25 Dr Simon Dudley
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
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In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 78837 National Geographic
Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
Environmental Sustainability of Ocean Mining
 
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Dr. Greg Stone explains the process of ocean mining and its environmental impact. Land mining releases carbon and displaces animals, whereas collecting nodules of base metals from the ocean floor is an efficient and environmentally friendly way to get the metals we need for cleaner forms of energy using batteries, wind turbines, and solar cells. He talks about the area in the ocean DeepGreen mines that looks like a desert containing nodules that have formed and can be picked up and processed with little to no waste. For the full episode visit: https://neurohacker.com/environmental-sustainability-an-earth-friendly-way-to-get-the-resources-we-need
Views: 49 Neurohacker
Deep Sea Mining: Searching for the Next Mineral Boom
 
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Deep down, way deep down, there's something stirring - something very, very valuable. It's a race to the bottom - to the bottom of the oceans. It is Deep Sea Mining. As deep as 5000 metres, maybe more, lie a host of materials critical for modern society, from smartphones to electric cars to green energy. But how can be it be mined without ruining another beautiful, so-far untouched - yet valuable part of our planet? Joining us on skype from Kingston, Jamaica Michael Lodge, Secretary-General at the International Seabed Authority; from Washington DC, Conn Nugent, Project Director of Seabed Mining Project at the Pew Charitable Trusts; Regan Drennan, Research Assistant at UK Seabed Resource who studies the biodiversity of the ocean floor; Charlotte Middlehurst, a Contributing Editor at China Dialogue, focusing on China's growing interest in deep sea mining. Roundtable is a discussion programme with an edge. Broadcast out of London and presented by David Foster, it's about bringing people to the table, listening to every opinion, and analysing every point of view. From fierce debate to reflective thinking, Roundtable discussions offer a different perspective on the issues that matter to you. Watch it every weekday at 15:30 GMT on TRT World. #mining #seabed #biodiversity Subscribe: http://trt.world/Roundtable Livestream: http://trt.world/ytlive Facebook: http://trt.world/facebook Twitter: http://trt.world/twitter Instagram: http://trt.world/instagram Visit our website: http://trt.world
Views: 995 Roundtable
Can conservation save our ocean? | The Economist
 
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The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G3TH9d The crew of this ship is on a mission to try and save one of the most endangered sea creatures on the planet. They’re in the middle of a marine protected area in Mexico - a conservation zone where certain types of fishing are banned. Local fishermen are poaching a species of fish that is so highly prized in China, they can make tens of thousands of dollars in just one night. With ocean life under threat from overfishing, pollution and climate change, could marine protected areas be the answer? Near the Mexican fishing town of San Felipe, on the The Upper Gulf of California... Conservation group, Sea Shepherd is working with the authorities to help enforce a Marine Protected Area - or MPA. A designated section of ocean to be conserved, managed and protected. Maintaining rich, diverse ecosystems is key for the health of the Ocean - and ultimately the survival of humanity. But ocean life is under threat. From plants to micro-organisms and animals, species are disappearing forever. Marine Biologist Patricia Gandolfo and the rest of the Sea Shepherd crew are here to stop poachers. Caught up in the nets of the criminal gangs and local fishermen is one particularly rare porpoise - the Vaquita. Worldwide there are thousands of sea species currently threatened with extinction. Losing just one species from the food chain can have a disastrous effect on an entire ecosystem. After it’s sold on, the Totoaba’s swim bladder can fetch up to $100,000 a kilo in China, where it’s prized for its medicinal properties. Critics disapprove of Sea Shepherds use of direct-action tactics in some of their campaigns, but in the Gulf of California, their presence is welcomed by the Mexican government. Globally, the fishing industry employs 260 million people, but many more subsistence fishermen depend on the ocean for their income. Local fisherman here claim protecting the ocean has limited how they can fish, destroying their way of life. Yet doing nothing may ultimately present more of a threat to their livelihoods. Currently Marine Protected Areas make up only 3.6% of the world’s ocean but a growing number of scientists are calling for 30% to be protected by 2030. Cabo Pulmo now has a thriving eco-tourism and diving industry. The environmental rewards provided by the MPA to the local community have been valued at millions of dollars a year - Far more than they ever made from fishing. The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Marine protected areas can come in many forms. But if they are to be effective, they must align the need for conservation with the needs of those who depend on the ocean for survival. In order to avoid disaster–and to ensure a sustainable supply of fish for the future–far more of our ocean needs urgent protection. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G4unAb Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G3AV1E Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G3TJOn Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G5cEIU Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G43hZY
Views: 69430 The Economist
Impact of deep sea mining enquiry- Environmental Audit Committee
 
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Geraint Davies MP questioned Professor Gideon Henderson, Chair of Future Ocean Resources, Royal Society, Michael Lodge, Secretary General, International Seabed Authority and Christopher Williams, Managing Director, UK Seabed Resources at a meeting of the Environmental Audit Committee. Mr Davies enquired about the impact of deep sea mining on marine environments. He was particularly concerned by the far field effects of mining in the deep sea whereby marine pollution drifts from designated mining zones to protected areas of the ocean., destroying wildlife and habitats.
Views: 15 Geraint Davies
Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic
 
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What causes climate change (also known as global warming)? And what are the effects of climate change? Learn the human impact and consequences of climate change for the environment, and our lives. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic https://youtu.be/G4H1N_yXBiA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 768683 National Geographic
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
 
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DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
Views: 868 Love Science
Impacts of River Sand Mining
 
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This video is about Impacts of River Sand Mining
Views: 844 Conner Knight
Claytus Yambon - Environmental and Cultural Impacts of Mining on the Sepik River, PNG
 
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Carver Claytus Yambon speaks in Victoria BC about the cultural and environmental consequences of mining in Papua New Guinea at the headwaters of the Sepik River. Sponsored by Pacific Peoples Partnership
Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific
 
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The world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the Pacific island nation of Papua New Guinea in early 2018. In this short film we explore how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage the future opportunities and impacts associated with this emerging industry. W​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several Pacific Island nations, questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods.
Views: 2328 Steve Menzies
Minimizing Environmental Impacts
 
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Protecting the environment starts long before construction begins, with the careful selection of a route that minimizes impact to community and natural environment.
Views: 736 EnbridgeGas
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 2944 Inhabitants
Seabed mining temporarily banned
 
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A moratorium on seabed mining has been placed on the NT's coastal waters to allow for an environmental impact assessment to be completed.
Deep sea minerals frameworks to inform decision-making
 
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1. The Regional Financial Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation is aimed at providing Pacific countries with a guide to the major issues to be addressed when setting up national financial frameworks. 2. The Regional Environmental Management Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation contains an overview of deep sea mineral deposit environments and potential environmental impacts of deep sea mining projects, as well as management and mitigation strategies, including an environmental impact assessment report template. Read more here; http://www.spc.int/en/media-releases/2538-deep-sea-minerals-frameworks-to-inform-decision-making.html
Views: 189 Pacific Community
SEABED MINING
 
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The impacts of seabed mining.
Views: 637 GreenhouseCartoons
4 - Governing deep seabed mining
 
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=== Abstract === Deep-sea mining is the process of retrieving mineral deposits from the deep seabed, the area of the seabed below 200m. Whilst there has been interest in the deep seabed since the 1970s, there has been growing interest in recent years due to the depleting deposits from terrestrial sources of metals such as manganese, coupled with the increasing demand for the same metals in green technologies such as wind turbines. Each resource type will have specific challenges, solutions, technologies and mining techniques. In essence, all will require seafloor vehicles to crush and collect the material which will then be fed to the support vessel. However, as the deep sea remains understudied and poorly understood, there are many gaps in our understanding of its biodiversity and ecosystems. This makes it difficult to thoroughly assess the potential impacts of deep-sea mining and to put in place adequate safeguards to protect the marine environment. As there are likely to be impacts beyond our current knowledge, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) is operating a dual mandate of promoting the development of deep-sea minerals whilst ensuring that this development is not harmful to the environment. As such, they are currently going through the process of consultation with the international community (government representatives, scientific community, private contractors etc.) to ensure that the marine life is adequately protected. This presentation will discuss why deep seabed mining is gaining traction and review the governance to date looking at what is already in place and where the gaps are. === Speaker: David Carlin, Ocean Governance SIG - https://www.imarest.org/special-interest-groups/ocean-governance === David is the Science Director at CEFAS, and has worked primarily on science, evidence and advice in support of the regulation of activities in the marine environment. He undertook a secondment to the former Marine and Fisheries Agency (the forerunner to the Marine Management Organisation, MMO) to provide a link between scientific evidence and regulation and assist with the transfer of policy and regulation between government departments. During his time at Cefas David has fulfilled a number of scientific and managerial roles within the organisation and roles outside, including programme steering group membership and ICES Expert Group Chair. He is a Fellow of the IMarEST and David was appointed Environment and Ecosystems Divisional Director in September 2012. === IMarEST Annual Conference 2019 - Shaping the future of a sustainable blue economy - https://www.imarest.org/annualconference
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!
 
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Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
Views: 7913 Seas At Risk
Top 10 Worst Man Made Environmental Disasters
 
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Top 10 Worst Man Made Environmental Disasters // Subscribe: http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD // The images in this video are powered by www.gettyimages.com The worst environmental disasters that took a serious toll on the environment and human life. WatchMojo presents the top 10 worst disasters to the environment to be caused by humans. But what will take the top spot on our list? Will it be the Kuwaiti Oil Fires, the Ecocide of Vietnam, or the Chernobyl Disaster? Watch to find out! 00:31 #10. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill 01:20 #9. The Shrinking of the Aral Sea 01:52 #8. Bhopal Disaster 02:32 #7. Electronic Waste in Guiyu, China 03:14 #6. Great Smog of London 03:47 #5. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill 04:31 #4. Castle Bravo 05:14 #3, #2, #1 ???? For more amazing images by Getty, check out www.gettyimages.com and https://www.instagram.com/gettyimages/ To help decide what top 10 list we make next, check out the suggest page here: http://www.watchmojo.com/my/suggest.php Our Magazine!! Learn the inner workings of WatchMojo and meet the voices behind the videos, articles by our specialists from gaming, film, tv, anime and more. VIEW INSTANTLY: http://goo.gl/SivjcX WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at shop.watchmojo.com WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superheroes. Your trusted authority on ranking Pop Culture.
Views: 151251 WatchMojo.com
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific
 
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Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
Views: 12405 Steve Menzies
Here's Where the Juice That Powers Batteries Comes From
 
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Ashlee Vance explores lithium mining in Chile’s Atacama Desert. Watch the full episode of 'Hello World: Chile': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii1aMY-vU70 Like this video? Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg?sub_confirmation=1 And subscribe to Bloomberg Politics for the latest political news: http://www.youtube.com/BloombergPolitics?sub_confirmation=1 Bloomberg is the First Word in business news, delivering breaking news & analysis, up-to-the-minute market data, features, profiles and more: http://www.bloomberg.com Connect with us on... Twitter: https://twitter.com/business Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bloombergbusiness Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bloombergbusiness/ Bloomberg Television brings you coverage of the biggest business stories and exclusive interviews with newsmakers, 24 hours a day: http://www.bloomberg.com/live Connect with us on... Twitter: https://twitter.com/bloombergtv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BloombergTelevision Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bloombergtv
Views: 2686883 Bloomberg
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 2: Deep Frontiers
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg instagram: inhabitants_tv #inhabitants Written by anthropologist Stefan Helmreich, What is Deep Sea Mining? Episode 2: Deep Frontiers is a brief history about knowledge of the deep sea and its resources. It highlights the ambiguity of this history, as depictions of the deep changed throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, this knowledge informs discussions about the commercialization of biological and geological resources, with the deep sea fast becoming a zone of international dispute, opening up a debate about sustainable practices at sea. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode web series dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This web series addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Stefan Helmreich is Professor of Anthropology at MIT. He is the author of Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas, and, most recently, of Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton University Press, 2016). His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, Cabinet, and The Wire. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 oceanolivre.org/ facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Stefan Helmreich, Matt Gianni, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: tba21.org/ tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282 #deepseamining
Views: 472 Inhabitants
Deep Sea Mining Concerns
 
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The group is concerned about the impacts associated with seabed mining. The feel their concern on this serious issue of experimental seabed mining was taken lightly because they were not formally recognized...
Views: 427 EMTV Online
Fracking explained: opportunity or danger
 
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Fracking explained in five minutes. Fracking is a controversial topic. On the one side the gas drilling companies, on the other citizen opposed to this drilling method. Politicians are also divided on the matter. We try to take a neutral look on fracking. It is relevant for all of us, because of high prices for energy and the danger for our drinking water. This video focuses mostly on the debate currently ongoing in europe. In a lot of european countries there is a public outcry against fracking, espacially in germany. But the facts in this video are relevant to all of us. Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt Fracking explained: opportunity or danger Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER   MINING MINERALS IN THE DEEP OCEAN  MAGANESE NODULE RECOVERY  22324
 
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“Oceanography: Mining Mineral In The Ocean” is an issue of the Science Screen Report, presented by United Technologies Sikorsky Aircraft, that discusses the potential and problems of have deep-sea mining for minerals. The issue opens with shots of the sea, which is a “reserve of global resources,” including metals from deep-sea nodules (polymetallic nodules). These nodules cover vast areas of the sea bottom, and their potential is the reason for a major deep-ocean project being carried out. Deep Sea Nodules can be the size of potatoes, and their porous structure accumulates layers of various metals. They are very slow growing, but sizeable nodules cover areas of the sea floor, providing a significant reserve of metals. As part of the project to determine the mining feasibility of nodules, the first self-propelled robot miner (01:38) is developed and tested. Scientists examine nodules in a lab (02:52), but to answer a number of questions surrounding them, the National Science Foundation uses Research Vessel Melvillle (03:12) to carry out underwater tests. Members of the crew lower sound beacons to create a grid (03:35). Then a robot mapping vehicle is lowered into the water to gather data within the grid. In the control room (04:10), the team monitors the robot’s data. The next step is the collection of sea floor samples (05:08); a box corer is lowered into the water to gather sample nodules, transporting nodules and their environment to the surface. Scientists examine the contents, conduct tests, and record data. The results indicate nodules may grow similar to coral. Next, piston corers (06:52) are used to take out samples of core sections of the floor to add to the mission’s overall understanding. After two weeks, the samples and data are collected, stored, and made accessible to over 50 research centers throughout the world. The next phase involves exploration ship Governor Ray (08:06), which monitors a sea mining research site, and Glomar Explorer (08:22), a surface platform ship (originally built as a deep-sea recovery platform for the CIA as part of Project Azorian also known as Project Jennifer) with an internal dry dock that holds the advanced robot miner. The crew preps for launch day by filling the dry dock, opening the doors (11:00), and moving the robot miner into the water. The robot miner hangs under the ship as pipe attachments are installed, connecting the miner and processor to transport nodule slurry. The robot miner is positioned and the processor is attached to it, enabling the mining operation to begin (12:18). Sonar and TV images show how easily the miner collects nodules as is moves across sea floor capturing images and harvesting nodules, which are crushed into a slurry and piped up to the ship. A commercial miner would be 10 times the size of the robot miner, but the smaller robot miner is the first step in the eventual commercial mining of the sea’s unique nodules. Background on this ... historic film is that it shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc. This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms. She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1302 PeriscopeFilm
What is Deep Sea Mining? Ep 3.: The Azores Case
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg ENG (see below for Portuguese) The third episode of the web series What is Deep Sea Mining? is set on the Azores archipelago, an autonomous region of Portugal located in the North Atlantic Ocean. Composed of nine volcanic islands that once thrived on the whaling industry, the Azores have since become a hot spot for research in marine biology due to its diverse ecosystems, as it is located above an active triple junction between the Eurasian, African, and North-American tectonic plates. In 2008, one year before Portugal submitted its proposal to extend its continental shelf to the United Nations, the Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals Inc. presented a proposal for mineral prospection and exploration in six areas off the coast of the Azores. Despite the fact that deep sea mining continues to be under debate between different governmental bodies, no effort was done to inform the wider public or local citizens about such plans. For this episode we interviewed different specialists in marine biology based in the islands, among them José Nuno Gomes-Pereira, Teresa Cerqueira, Telmo Morato, and Gisela Dionísio, as well as member of the European Parliament Ricardo Serrão Santos, on the potential impacts of deep sea mining on local ecosystems and on the archipelago’s economical reality. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a web series commissioned by TBA21–Academy.  Acknowledgements: Aurora Ribeiro, Espaço Talassa, Gisela Dionísio, Gonçalo Carvalho, Gonçalo Tocha, Henrique Ramos, Joana Borges Coutinho, José Nuno Gomes-Pereira, Luis Rodrigues, Márcia Dutra, Museu da Horta, Museu do Pico, Naturalist, Norberto, Ricardo Serrão Santos, Serge Viallelle, Telmo Morato, Tomás Melo, Quinta do bom despacho, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos.  PT Para o terceiro episódio da série What is Deep Sea Mining?/ O que é a mineração em mar profundo? viajámos até ao arquipélago dos Açores, território autónomo de Portugal situado no Atlântico norte. Composto por nove ilhas vulcânicas outrora famosas pela indústria da baleação, os Açores tornaram-se entretanto um local de destaque para a investigação em biologia marinha, visto que ao se localizar sobre a Dorsal Mesoatlântica, entre as placas tectónicas Euroasiática, Africana e Norte Americana, a região apresenta uma grande diversidade de ecossistemas. Em 2008, um ano antes de Portugal propor às Nações Unidas o aumento da sua placa continental, a companhia de mineração Canadiana Nautilus Minerals Inc. apresentou uma proposta para prospeção e potencial exploração de minerais em mar profundo em seis áreas ao largo dos Açores. Apesar da mineração em mar profundo ser alvo de debate entre vários representantes governamentais, não foi feito qualquer esforço para informar os cidadãos locais e o público em geral de tais planos. Para este episódio entrevistámos diferentes especialistas em biologia marinha baseados nas ilhas, entre estes José Nuno Gomes-Pereira, Teresa Cerqueira, Telmo Morato e Gisela Dionísio, bem como o eurodeputado Ricardo Serrão Santos, para saber mais sobre os potenciais impactos da mineração em mar profundo nos ecossistemas locais e na realidade económica da região. What is Deep Sea Mining? é uma série desenvolvida em colaboração com Margarida Mendes, curadora e ativista de Lisboa, Portugal, e membro fundador do movimento ambientalista contra a mineração em mar profundo, Oceano Livre. What is Deep Sea Mining? é uma comissão de TBA21–Academy. Agradecimentos: Aurora Ribeiro, Espaço Talassa, Gisela Dionísio, Gonçalo Carvalho, Gonçalo Tocha, Henrique Ramos, Joana Borges Coutinho, José Nuno Gomes-Pereira, Luis Rodrigues, Márcia Dutra, Museu da Horta, Museu do Pico, Naturalist, Norberto, Ricardo Serrão Santos, Serge Viallelle, Telmo Morato, Tomás Melo, Quinta do bom despacho, and everyone who helped this web series. Um agradecimento especial a: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos.
Views: 248 Inhabitants
Insight: Rare–earth metals
 
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Did you know the smooth running of almost every piece of technology you use - is down to something called a rare-earth metal? The Insight team ask why a monopolised market is causing global concern. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7fWeaHhqgM4Ry-RMpM2YYw?sub_confirmation=1 Livestream: http://www.youtube.com/c/trtworld/live Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTWorld Twitter: https://twitter.com/TRTWorld Visit our website: http://www.trtworld.com/
Views: 14442 TRT World
Sustainable Seabed Mining: A New Concept For Atlantis II Deep
 
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Research on seabed exploitation and seabed mining is a complex transdisciplinary field that demands for further attention and development. Since the field links engineering, economics, environmental, legal and supply chain research, it demands for research from a systems point of view. This implies the application of a holistic sustainability framework of to analyse the feasibility of engineering systems. The research at hand aims to close this gap by developing such a framework and providing a review of seabed resources. Based on this review it identifies a significant potential for massive sulphides in inactive hydrothermal vents and sediments to solve global resource scarcities. The research aims to provide background on seabed exploitation and to apply a holistic systems engineering approach to develop general guidelines for sustainable seabed mining of polymetallic sulphides and a new concept and solutions for the Atlantis II Deep deposit in the Red Sea. The research methodology adpted will start with acquiring a broader academic and industrial view on sustainable seabed mining through online survey and expert interviews on seabed mining. The experts are chosen according to their knowledge in one or more of the dimensions of seabed mining introduced in the research framework. The Nautilus Minerals case is also reviewd for lessons learned for seabed mining and the presented concept in particular with identification of challaenges and issues. Therafter, a new concept and site specific assessment for Atlantis II Deep is developed. The research undertaken in this study provides a new perspective regarding the sustainable seabed mining. The main contributions of this research are the development of extensive guidelines for key issues in sustainable seabed mining as well as a new concept for seabed mining involving engineering systems, environmental impact, economical benefits, logistics chain supply and legal aspects.
Views: 4648 Dr Hany Elosta
PNG DEEP SEA MINING BBC NEWS AT TEN
 
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Plans for the world's first deep sea mine are taking shape in the waters off Papua New Guinea. The ocean floor is rich in gold, copper and other minerals in big demand around the world. But some scientists warn that digging up the seabed will destroy marine life, and Sir David Attenborough is among those objecting. BBC News science editor David Shukman reports.
Views: 3459 David Shukman
The Future of Ocean Exploration
 
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Biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, underwater drones, and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification: exploring the future of oceanographic discovery. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos: Mining: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/video/2017/jun/28/robots-ocean-floor-deep-sea-mining-video Sonar mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRQuID0IwbY Microbes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uktdKw_bJ_8 Biofluorescence: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/david-gruber/ Susan Avery TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQIgKyX3oU Triona McGrath TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJPpJhQxaLw Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOIOXvU0_qk James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSfESqX-E84 Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUzz_ilsFa0 Onboard the Okeanos Explorer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0G68ORc8uQ With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier. Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species. This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations. 40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans. But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets. That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how landforms and moves over time. Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man. [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...” In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple. Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium-ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on. But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem. One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.
Views: 37313 The Daily Conversation
What Is Water Pollution | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about water pollution, whilst learning about environmental chemistry. The substances mankind throws away have polluted lakes, rivers and even the oceans. The United Nations estimate that around 10% of the world’s people do not have access to clean drinking water. The main problem with this untreated water is that it can carry diseases, such as cholera, that spread through untreated human faeces. This is particularly serious in shanty towns near big cities and in refugee camps. Rivers and streams can also be polluted with diseases from water coming from badly managed rubbish dumps. But human sewage is not the only substance that pollutes our water supplies – most of the other substances humans allow to escape into streams, rivers and the oceans, are more a danger to natural ecosystems than to us directly. Chemical fertilisers are much more soluble in water than organic, manure-based fertilisers, so heavy rain can wash them into streams and lakes, causing eutrophication. The fertilisers cause algae to grow very fast forming a mat on the lake surface, which blocks sunlight from the vegetation deeper down, which then dies. Bacteria feed off the dying vegetation and use up the remaining oxygen supply. Once the oxygen has gone all animal life dies and the lake ecosystem is destroyed. If heavy metals, such as lead mercury and cadmium, get into rivers and lakes many animals will die. Radioactive waste is normally stored above ground in water tanks, waiting for a more permanent underground storage where it has to be safe for millions of years. There are fears that these underground stores could fail and contaminate water courses. Following a nuclear disaster, water courses and the oceans can become dangerously polluted with radioactive waste. During mining and drilling operations to extract minerals from the earth, aquifers, which are underground water courses, can become polluted. Huge amounts of plastic thrown away from ships, and washed out to sea from rubbish dumps on land, have ended up floating in huge islands of waste causing a serious threat to fish, seabirds and other marine animals. Coal and oil fuelled power stations have been responsible, more so in the past, for causing acid rain. Fossil fuel and nuclear power stations need large amounts of water for condensing the steam which drives their turbines. This water is usually cooled on site in the great cooling towers that dominate the skyline of power-stations. Even so the water will be returned to the river or sea warmer than before. This can upset the river or sea ecosystems. Although not material pollution this waste heat is a pollutant. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015
 
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Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling problem; Need for consistent funding of deep-sea research. David Billett, PhD in Deep-sea Ecology at the University of Southampton, is the Managing Director at Deep Seas Environmental Solutions and a Visiting Research Fellow at the National Oceanography Centre. His work focuses in finding solutions for the use of ocean resources and the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems. 00:08 Research focus 02:33 About the ISA 06:34 Types of deep-sea minerals 11:57 Technology for deep-sea exploration and exploitation 12:44 Science-industry cooperation 15:03 Public outreach 16:56 Deep-sea mining 19:56 Decision-making process: the ISA case 21:50 Challenges for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 168 SOPHIA
Introducing the NIOZ Deep Sea Science & Technology Centre
 
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Seas and oceans cover approximately 70% of the earth's surface, and most of this is deep sea, an environment about which we still know still very little. The potential for mining of raw materials in these wide expanses is enormous, and the international offshore and maritime industries are increasingly interested in the deep sea. It is generally acknowledged that a sound knowledge of the deep sea environment is crucial for further developing this deep sea mining concept in a responsible and sustainable way to protect valuable and vulnerable parts of the same deep sea environment. Fathoming the depths of the oceans -- even to depths of 6 km and beyond -- has been a part of our core business at NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research for many decades. Interested? Please contact Ir. Marck Smit, Head of our Deep Sea Science & Technology Centre. His contact details can be found on our web-site www.nioz.nl/deepsea .
Views: 978 NIOZ
Case study from Portugal: Emerging deep sea mining interests vs. hydrothermal vent conservation
 
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The video is part of the Workshop "Limits to Blue Growth in the Deep Sea" at the European Maritime Day, held in Bremen, Germany on 19 May 2014 organised by World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the Institute for the Law of the Sea and International Marine Environmental Law (ISRIM).
Views: 252 ISRIM
Philippines shuts down mining operations
 
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Philippines shuts down mining operations The environment agency in the Philippines has cancelled at least 70 large-scale mining contracts. The government says it is stepping up its campaign to stop extraction in what it describes as “critical areas” in the south of the country. But many people from the mining industry, who fear for their livelihoods, have opposed the decision. Al Jazeera's Jamela Alindogan reports from Compostela Valley in the southern Philippines. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 10133 Al Jazeera English
DSM Out Of Darkness
 
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Documentary focuses on environmental impacts of deep sea mining in the Pacific.
Views: 41 Pacific Community
The impact of fracking
 
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The combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling that has occurred in the last decade has environmental implications, and learning more about those effects and what policies need to be made to control them is important, says U-M Assistant Professor Brian Ellis. Ellis, who is studying the potential water quality impacts associated with hydraulic fracturing activities, explains the process of hydraulic fracturing and why it motivates his research. ABOUT THE PROFESSOR: Brain Ellis (http://www.cee.umich.edu/people/faculty/Brian%20R.%20Ellis,%20Ph.D.) is an assistant professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering (http://cee.engin.umich.edu/) at the University of Michigan. His research interests cover topics related to the sustainable and safe development of emerging energy technologies, including geologic storage of CO2 and large-scale hydrualic fracturing of unconventional oil/gas reservoirs.
Views: 20887 Michigan Engineering
Economic Benefits & Environmental Impacts of Offshore Phosphate Mining in Namibia
 
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by: Alna Dall One Exclusive Phosphorous is the eleventh most common element in the world. It helps in the creation of our DNA, it is needed for your body to form bones and teeth. It is also an essential part of cell growth in plants. It can be found everywhere in products like carbonated drinks, detergents but more importantly, fertilizers. Although it occurs naturally in substances such as bone, ash, urine and animal manure, in order to keep up with the global demand for phosphorous, it has been mined for centuries from phosphate rock - a natural and non-renewable resource. There a few sites along the Namibian coast where large quantities of phosphate rock have been detected on the seabed floor...but mines have been unable to start dredging, due to a 18 month moratorium from Government. Stakeholders from the fishing industry demanded extensive research to be done on the impact such mining would have on not only the environment, but the fishing industry as well. We speak to Hans Huckstedt from LL Namibia Phosphates about the outcomes of these studies, the economic benefits and perceived pitfalls of phosphate mining, as well as THEIR role in a form of mining that has never been attempted before.
Views: 789 One Africa TV
Deep-sea scientists on the impacts of mining and the need for more research - DSBS 2015
 
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Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Deep-sea mining impacts: preliminary results from MIDAS; Need for science-industry collaboration; High biodiversity in the deep ocean: results from ABYSSLINE at the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone; Need for further fundamental deep-sea research (knowledge gaps; deep-sea taxonomy; science-policy interface; EIA; sustainable management planning; scientists as governance advisors); Scientific collaboration and data sharing; Increasing needs of the research community: the Portuguese case (capacity building; science funding; resource investment); Public perceptions on the deep-sea; Population connectivity. 00:08 Deep-sea mining impacts: results from MIDAS 03:03 Need for science-industry collaboration 04:54 Deep-sea biodiversity: results from ABYSSLINE 07:27 Need for fundamental deep-sea science 12:24 Prospects for deep-sea research 15:50 Increasing needs of the scientific community 20:23 Public perceptions on the deep-sea 21:16 High biodiversity in the deep ocean Ana Colaço, PhD in Ecology and Biosystematics by the University of Lisbon, is a Principal Investigator at MARE-Azores-IMAR. Her research focuses on hydrothermal vents ecosystems, and trophic relationships on seamounts. Craig Smith (at the middle) is a Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii and the Principal investigator of the Benthic-Ecology Lab at this University. His research focuses on deep-sea biodiversity, disturbance ecology, and human impacts in seafloor ecosystems. Adrian Glover (on the right) is a Research Leader in the Life Sciences Department of the Natural History Museum, London and a Visiting Researcher at the University of Southampton. His research focuses on deep-sea biodiversity, Antarctic biodiversity, annelid evolution and ecology. SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 156 SOPHIA
Mining
 
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019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 83075 Bozeman Science
Kate Larkin on the challenges for deep-sea research - DSBS 2015
 
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Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: European Marine Board: scope, objectives and frameworks; Deep-sea definition problem; Integrative and ecosystem-based concept of the deep-sea; European position in deep-sea research; Research trends and priorities; Basic research vs technology and innovation development, Deep-sea mining; Ocean connectivity; Main knowledge gaps; Need for science-policy-industry interfaces; Private vs public funding trends; Technology development needs; The issue of a fragmented governance regime; Science as a driver for deep-sea governance; Collaboration and outreach activities; Importance of an ocean literate society; Appropriate governance pathways; Transparency and open data access recommendations. Kate Larkin, doctor in Marine Sciences by the University of Southampton, is Deputy Head of the European Marine Board Secretariat and also provides leadership in areas of marine research infrastructures, ocean observation systems and science-policy interfaces. 01:04 Scope of the European Marine Board 03:15 Deep-sea definition 06:06 Trends in European deep-sea research 08:38 Priorities of deep-sea research 11:18 Main knowledge gaps 13:32 Funding opportunities 15:45 Technology development needs 16:39 Deep-sea governance frameworks 18:54 Ocean literacy 20:53 Appropriate governance 22:27 Transparency and open data access SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 159 SOPHIA
Hot Fuzz (4/10) Movie CLIP - Sea Mine (2007) HD
 
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Hot Fuzz movie clips: http://j.mp/1uwjDCy BUY THE MOVIE: http://amzn.to/uoaVE7 Don't miss the HOTTEST NEW TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/1u2y6pr CLIP DESCRIPTION: Angel (Simon Pegg) and Danny (Nick Frost) discover a huge cache of weapons hidden at a local farm. FILM DESCRIPTION: A top London cop who is so good at his job that he makes his fellow officers look like slackers by comparison is "promoted" to serve in the sleepy village of Sandford in this contemporary action comedy from the creators of Shaun of the Dead. Police constable Nicholas Angel (Simon Pegg) always gets his man, but these days his impeccable record seems to be more indicative of his fellow officers' shortcomings than his own formidable skills as a keeper of the peace. Loathe to stand idly by as their once respectable track record is steadily soiled by the hyper-competent actions of one lone overachiever, Sergeant Angel's superiors at the Met soon determine to remedy their problem by relocating the decorated constable to the West Country village of Sanford -- where tranquil garden parties and neighborhood watch meetings stand in stark contrast to the violent crime and heated gunplay of the city. As Sergeant Angel does his best to adjust to the relative calm of his new environment, his oafish new partner Danny Butterman (Nick Frost) strives to gain the respect of his fellow constables while sustaining himself on fantasies of his favorite action films and police shows. Later, just as it begins to appear as if Sergeant Angel has been relegated to an uneventful existence in the relative calm of the countryside, a series of horrific "accidents" lead him to suspect that the tranquil hamlet of Sanford has fallen prey to a sinister plot which reeks of foul play. Jim Broadbent, Timothy Dalton, Steve Coogan, and Martin Freeman co-star in the Edgar Wright film. CREDITS: TM & © Universal (2007) Cast: David Bradley, Nick Frost, Karl Johnson, Simon Pegg Director: Edgar Wright Producers: Karen Beever, Eric Fellner, Nira Park, Ronaldo Vasconcellos, Natascha Wharton, Tim Bevan Screenwriters: Simon Pegg, Edgar Wright WHO ARE WE? The MOVIECLIPS channel is the largest collection of licensed movie clips on the web. Here you will find unforgettable moments, scenes and lines from all your favorite films. Made by movie fans, for movie fans. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MOVIE CHANNELS: MOVIECLIPS: http://bit.ly/1u2yaWd ComingSoon: http://bit.ly/1DVpgtR Indie & Film Festivals: http://bit.ly/1wbkfYg Hero Central: http://bit.ly/1AMUZwv Extras: http://bit.ly/1u431fr Classic Trailers: http://bit.ly/1u43jDe Pop-Up Trailers: http://bit.ly/1z7EtZR Movie News: http://bit.ly/1C3Ncd2 Movie Games: http://bit.ly/1ygDV13 Fandango: http://bit.ly/1Bl79ye Fandango FrontRunners: http://bit.ly/1CggQfC HIT US UP: Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1y8M8ax Twitter: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt Pinterest: http://bit.ly/14wL9De Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1vUwhH7
Views: 1263941 Movieclips
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
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Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 4035 GeologicalSociety
The cost-benefit analysis of an environmental disaster
 
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review.chicagobooth.edu | In response to the documentary film "The Devil We Know," Chicago Booth's Luigi Zingales discusses DuPont's decision-making regarding the toxic chemical PFOA, used in the production of Teflon. The case, he says, provides an unfortunate study in what happens when companies' incentives don't align with society's best interests.
This country isn't just carbon neutral — it's carbon negative | Tshering Tobgay
 
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Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time. In this illuminating talk, Bhutan's Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay shares his country's mission to put happiness before economic growth and set a world standard for environmental preservation. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 1241052 TED
"Mining in the Deep"- AP Environmental Science Adele Parody
 
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Well, I spent too much time on a crappy slideshow to help me study and jump start my YouTube career. According to research to my study buddy Keely, Adele is an environmentalist. I have nothing to back this stuff, but she seems pretty down to earth, so close enough.
Views: 46 Official ellimac
Precious Metals from Deep-Sea Vents
 
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Video presentations from the Morss Colloquium. http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=28896 Deep-Sea Mining of Seafloor Massive Sulfides: A Reality for Science and Society in the 21st Century Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are attracting considerable interest from commercial mining companies. Vent systems precipitate seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits that are rich in copper, gold, silver, and zinc. Although commercial firms are targeting inactive SMS deposits, these deposits are so little studied that it is unknown whether they harbor unique species or ecosystems. The new frontier of deep-sea exploration and mining raises a number of questions about the sustainable use of these resources and potential environmental impacts. This Workshop and Colloquium was held on April 1 - 2, 2009, and brought together scientists, specialists in marine conservation, mineral economics, international law, the International Seabed Authority, national interests in SMS, and representatives of industry and NGOs to inform each other, and the public, about this important topic. The issue of deep-sea mining of SMS is of global importance, connected to the global economy, society, and the conservation of unique marine life.
Views: 1642 cfini72
Jeff Ardron on the prospects for deep-sea mining - DSBS 2015
 
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Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Hydrothermal vent fields; Main knowledge gaps; Deep-sea mining; Funding perspectives for deep-sea research. Jeff Ardron holds an MSc in Environment and Management by the Royal Roads University and is an Adviser on Ocean Governance at the Commonwealth Secretariat, London, and the co-founder and President of the Board for PacMARA. His research focuses on deep sea mining concerning transparency of resource governance. 00:16 Main knowledge gaps 01:24 Prospects for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 72 SOPHIA

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