Home
Search results “Deep sea mining problems in the environment”
Deep sea mining and it's problems for the environment
 
14:36
Health education support environment
Views: 22 Dr Simon Dudley
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
14:49
The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1969690 The Economist
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
 
02:32
DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
Views: 580 Love Science
Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
57:45
(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
02:54
In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 60074 National Geographic
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
06:45
Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 2209 Inhabitants
11 Worst Pollutants in the World
 
08:22
Here are the 11 worst pollutants and the ones that have the most negative effects on the environment like slag and oil spill disaster. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5. Slag No, that is not Nickelodeon getting rid of their leftover slime. What’s being dumped is slag. Slag is the leftover materials from ore after the desired material has already been extracted. Slag dumping was generally considered safe until recently. It has even commonly been repurposed for the process of creating cement. However, recent studies reveal that the leftover slag could be producing toxic levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium, barium, zinc and copper. The gradual weathering of the slag can pollute everything surrounding it, including the water and air. This isn’t all slag, though, the harmful effects are mostly caused by slag that is left over from refining copper, zinc, cadmium and other base metals. 4. Untreated Sewage Sewage isn’t really something that most people like to think about, but that doesn’t stop it from being a big problem. The untreated sewage contains human feces and wastewater that, obviously, have some pretty damaging effects. Raw sewage is often dumped into water supplies in poor areas of the world because there isn’t much of an alternative. Besides causing a plethora of dangerous diseases, the waste also destroys ecosystems and lowers the oxygen contents so that no life can survive in the water. The World Health Organization estimates that 2.6 billion people were affected by raw sewage dumping because there was no other way to dispose of it. WHO is making strides in extending access to modern sewage treatment to the communities that most need it. 3. Oil With the highly publicized BP Deepwater Horizon, the oil spill that happened in 2010 and is still affecting the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, the dangers of oil drilling is more well known than ever. The 580 tons of oil that were spilled wasn’t even the biggest oil spill in the world. Not even close. The biggest happened in Kuwait in 1991 when 136,000 tons of oil was spilled. Oil can devastate the local marine life. Oil is especially dangerous to animals with feathers or heavy fur because the oil can insulate them and make them more vulnerable to temperature, especially hypothermia, and reduce their buoyancy. Almost all of the birds affected by oil spills die without human intervention. Some studies say that oil spills are happening less, but that has been disputed. There has still been 9,351 accidental oil spill since 1974 and each one means that the surrounding ecosystem needs decades to recover from the accident. 2. Gold Mining Gold is pretty. It’s the gold standard for jewelry and that pun was most definitely intended. Our country was practically founded because of it. There are two processes for mining the mineral, though, and both are insanely dangerous. The two process are the cyanide process, which is the most common today, and the mercury process. It pretty obvious that with names like that it’s going to be dangerous. Cyanide is incredibly poisonous in tiny quantities and there have been massive cyanide spills throughout time because of the industry. The cyanide leaks have been known to poison fish in local rivers for long stretches. These leaks are considered by many to be massive environmental disasters. There is also a ton of waste produced from the mining. Thirty tons of ore are disposed of for every half pound of gold mined. The ore dumps also have major levels of cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, selenium and mercury. The danger of these dumps is second only to the danger of radioactive waste dumps. 1.Radiation Radioactive waste didn’t become a real problem until the birth of the nuclear power plant. Most of the radioactive waste that the world has is caused by nuclear fission or nuclear technology. The waste is maintained by the government, but leaks have been known to happen. The most notable cases of radiation damage can be found in Chernobyl. The leak happened in 1986 and the site still isn’t considered safe. Radiation decays over time, though, so this problem is more manageable than other items on this list. If the radioactive waste is contained for the right amount of time, then it can be more safely disposed of. Without proper containment, though, the radiation can lead to death and various cancers. There are also dangers to future generations as well because it has been documented that radiation can cause severe birth defects.
Views: 2321082 Talltanic
AGU 2015  TOP TEN Clip 5   Deep Sea Mining Environmental Survey Azores
 
10:55
More information about the 2015 AGU Cinema can be found here: http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/event/agu-cinema-short-films-on-science-wednesday/
What Drugs Do You Need to Survive in Space?
 
03:59
Traveling through space is rough on an astronaut’s body. What drugs do they take to cope? How One of NASA’s Deep Space Challenges Could Be Solved in the Ocean | The Swim - https://youtu.be/ogpE0mem9xE Read More: Preventing Bone Loss in Space Flight with Prophylactic Use of Bisphosphonate https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/benefits/bone_loss.html “Crew members engage in physical exercise for two and a half hours a day, six times a week (fifteen hours a week) while in orbit to avoid these issues. Nevertheless, the risks of these problems occurring cannot be completely eliminated through physical exercise alone.” Sensory Conflict Compared in Microgravity, Artificial Gravity, Motion Sickness, and Vestibular Disorders https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3668558/ “By modeling the sensory conflict between the vestibular and somatosensory systems, we computed a measure of linear conflict known as the “Stretch Factor.” We hypothesized that the motions with the greatest Stretch Factor would be the most provocative motions.” The space-flight environment: the International Space Station and beyond https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2691437/ “Human space exploration is dependent on robust spacecraft design and sophisticated life-support technologies, both of which are critical for working in the hostile space environment. This article focuses on the specific challenges of the space environment.” ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/
Views: 61229 Seeker
Fracking explained: opportunity or danger
 
05:04
Fracking explained in five minutes. Fracking is a controversial topic. On the one side the gas drilling companies, on the other citizen opposed to this drilling method. Politicians are also divided on the matter. We try to take a neutral look on fracking. It is relevant for all of us, because of high prices for energy and the danger for our drinking water. This video focuses mostly on the debate currently ongoing in europe. In a lot of european countries there is a public outcry against fracking, espacially in germany. But the facts in this video are relevant to all of us. Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt Fracking explained: opportunity or danger Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Deep sea minerals frameworks to inform decision-making
 
01:58
1. The Regional Financial Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation is aimed at providing Pacific countries with a guide to the major issues to be addressed when setting up national financial frameworks. 2. The Regional Environmental Management Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation contains an overview of deep sea mineral deposit environments and potential environmental impacts of deep sea mining projects, as well as management and mitigation strategies, including an environmental impact assessment report template. Read more here; http://www.spc.int/en/media-releases/2538-deep-sea-minerals-frameworks-to-inform-decision-making.html
Views: 170 Pacific Community
HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER   MINING MINERALS IN THE DEEP OCEAN  MAGANESE NODULE RECOVERY  22324
 
14:25
“Oceanography: Mining Mineral In The Ocean” is an issue of the Science Screen Report, presented by United Technologies Sikorsky Aircraft, that discusses the potential and problems of have deep-sea mining for minerals. The issue opens with shots of the sea, which is a “reserve of global resources,” including metals from deep-sea nodules (polymetallic nodules). These nodules cover vast areas of the sea bottom, and their potential is the reason for a major deep-ocean project being carried out. Deep Sea Nodules can be the size of potatoes, and their porous structure accumulates layers of various metals. They are very slow growing, but sizeable nodules cover areas of the sea floor, providing a significant reserve of metals. As part of the project to determine the mining feasibility of nodules, the first self-propelled robot miner (01:38) is developed and tested. Scientists examine nodules in a lab (02:52), but to answer a number of questions surrounding them, the National Science Foundation uses Research Vessel Melvillle (03:12) to carry out underwater tests. Members of the crew lower sound beacons to create a grid (03:35). Then a robot mapping vehicle is lowered into the water to gather data within the grid. In the control room (04:10), the team monitors the robot’s data. The next step is the collection of sea floor samples (05:08); a box corer is lowered into the water to gather sample nodules, transporting nodules and their environment to the surface. Scientists examine the contents, conduct tests, and record data. The results indicate nodules may grow similar to coral. Next, piston corers (06:52) are used to take out samples of core sections of the floor to add to the mission’s overall understanding. After two weeks, the samples and data are collected, stored, and made accessible to over 50 research centers throughout the world. The next phase involves exploration ship Governor Ray (08:06), which monitors a sea mining research site, and Glomar Explorer (08:22), a surface platform ship (originally built as a deep-sea recovery platform for the CIA as part of Project Azorian also known as Project Jennifer) with an internal dry dock that holds the advanced robot miner. The crew preps for launch day by filling the dry dock, opening the doors (11:00), and moving the robot miner into the water. The robot miner hangs under the ship as pipe attachments are installed, connecting the miner and processor to transport nodule slurry. The robot miner is positioned and the processor is attached to it, enabling the mining operation to begin (12:18). Sonar and TV images show how easily the miner collects nodules as is moves across sea floor capturing images and harvesting nodules, which are crushed into a slurry and piped up to the ship. A commercial miner would be 10 times the size of the robot miner, but the smaller robot miner is the first step in the eventual commercial mining of the sea’s unique nodules. Background on this ... historic film is that it shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc. This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms. She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1050 PeriscopeFilm
Insight: Rare–earth metals
 
12:19
Did you know the smooth running of almost every piece of technology you use - is down to something called a rare-earth metal? The Insight team ask why a monopolised market is causing global concern. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7fWeaHhqgM4Ry-RMpM2YYw?sub_confirmation=1 Livestream: http://www.youtube.com/c/trtworld/live Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTWorld Twitter: https://twitter.com/TRTWorld Visit our website: http://www.trtworld.com/
Views: 7858 TRT World
The Truth On Sea Bed Mining by Prof. Chalapan Kaluwin _2.wmv
 
08:21
Interview with Professor Chalapan Kaluwin - Environment & Conservation University of Papua New Guinea
Harmful Environmental Impacts of Oil Drilling in Alaska
 
02:12
Public argument about oil drilling in Alaska for my English 102 class.
Views: 2169 Elisabeth Bergman
Ban seabed mining the Top End
 
04:55
Just like taking a bulldozer to the sea floor, destructive seabed mining threatens our Top End coasts and lifestyle. It has never been allowed before in Australia, but we know that there are many locations across the Territory coast where seabed mining has already been approved or where applications to mine exist. Destructive seabed mining would decimate our marine life, pollute our waters, threaten our fishing and destroy sites of cultural significance. Sign the petition asking the Gunner Government to ban seabed mining for good. Sign the petition - https://www.topendcoasts.org.au/seabed_mining_no_way
Is It Too Late To Save The Oceans?
 
08:13
Check us out on iTunes! http://dne.ws/1NixUds Please Subscribe! http://testu.be/1FjtHn5 Ocean acidification, over-fishing, warming climate and other environmental triggers may spell the next "Great Dying," but are we there yet? + + + + + + + + Previous Episode: Where Did All Our Oceans Come From?: https://youtu.be/UZId82qTZiQ?list=PLwwOk5fvpuuKAWK2Gjh9dL6CA7GDfHfg0 + + + + + + + + Sources: Ocean Fish Numbers Cut In Half Since 1970: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ocean-fish-numbers-cut-in-half-since-1970/ “The amount of fish in the oceans has halved since 1970, in a plunge to the "brink of collapse" caused by over-fishing and other threats, the WWF conservation group said on Wednesday." Global Warming And Hurricanes: http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-hurricanes “It is premature to conclude that human activities--and particularly greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming--have already had a detectable impact on Atlantic hurricane or global tropical cyclone activity." Marine Problems: Pollution: http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/problems/pollution/ “From plastic bags to pesticides - most of the waste we produce on land eventually reaches the oceans, either through deliberate dumping or from run-off through drains and rivers." Marine Pollution: http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/critical-issues-marine-pollution/ “The oceans are so vast and deep that until fairly recently, it was widely assumed that no matter how much trash and chemicals humans dumped into them, the effects would be negligible. Proponents of dumping in the oceans even had a catchphrase: 'The solution to pollution is dilution.'" + + + + + + + + TestTube Plus is built for enthusiastic science fans seeking out comprehensive conversations on the geeky topics they love. Host Trace Dominguez digs beyond the usual scope to deliver details, developments and opinions on advanced topics like AI, string theory and Mars exploration. TestTube Plus is also offered as an audio podcast on iTunes. + + + + + + + + Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/TraceDominguez TestTube on Facebook https://facebook.com/testtubenetwork TestTube on Google+ http://gplus.to/TestTube + + + + + + + +
Views: 32744 Science Plus
The Dangers of Offshore Drilling
 
04:42
A look at the negative effects of offshore drilling using the Deepwater Horizon oil spill as an example of the environmental and economic impacts.
Views: 5171 BlugoldSeminar
The Amazing Future of Deep Ocean Exploration
 
12:26
Biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, underwater drones, and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification: exploring the future of oceanographic discovery. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos: Mining: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/video/2017/jun/28/robots-ocean-floor-deep-sea-mining-video Sonar mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRQuID0IwbY Microbes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uktdKw_bJ_8 Biofluorescence: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/david-gruber/ Susan Avery TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQIgKyX3oU Triona McGrath TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJPpJhQxaLw Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOIOXvU0_qk James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSfESqX-E84 Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUzz_ilsFa0 Onboard the Okeanos Explorer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0G68ORc8uQ With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier. Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species. This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations. 40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans. But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets. That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how landforms and moves over time. Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man. [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...” In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple. Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium-ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on. But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem. One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.
Views: 30998 The Daily Conversation
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 2: Deep Frontiers
 
06:47
Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg instagram: inhabitants_tv #inhabitants Written by anthropologist Stefan Helmreich, What is Deep Sea Mining? Episode 2: Deep Frontiers is a brief history about knowledge of the deep sea and its resources. It highlights the ambiguity of this history, as depictions of the deep changed throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, this knowledge informs discussions about the commercialization of biological and geological resources, with the deep sea fast becoming a zone of international dispute, opening up a debate about sustainable practices at sea. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode web series dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This web series addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Stefan Helmreich is Professor of Anthropology at MIT. He is the author of Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas, and, most recently, of Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton University Press, 2016). His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, Cabinet, and The Wire. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 oceanolivre.org/ facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Stefan Helmreich, Matt Gianni, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: tba21.org/ tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282 #deepseamining
Views: 135 Inhabitants
Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific
 
10:37
The world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the Pacific island nation of Papua New Guinea in early 2018. In this short film we explore how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage the future opportunities and impacts associated with this emerging industry. W​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several Pacific Island nations, questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods.
Views: 2120 Steve Menzies
Deep Sea Mining Concerns
 
01:58
The group is concerned about the impacts associated with seabed mining. The feel their concern on this serious issue of experimental seabed mining was taken lightly because they were not formally recognized...
Views: 417 EMTV Online
SEABED MINING
 
05:36
The impacts of seabed mining.
Views: 436 GreenhouseCartoons
Royal NIOZ & STW - Ecology research on Deep Sea Mining - Azores
 
10:45
Can valuable mineral resources on the ocean floor be responsibly mined? To answer this question, we need to know much more about the deep-sea environments where these minerals occur in high concentrations. In April 2015, an international team of marine scientists sailed with the Dutch research vessel 'Pelagia' of Royal NIOZ to a site southwest of the Azores. Their mission: to collect data and perform experiments around a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located on the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Sulfide minerals precipitating from the hydrothermal exhausts locally form massive sulfide deposits at the seafloor. In places where hydrothermal activity has ceased, these mineral deposits may become economically viable mining sites. Scientific understanding of the key geological, oceanographic and biological processes at those sites is of pivotal importance for policy makers to weigh the potential gain of valuable minerals against the potential environmental risks of deep sea mining.
Views: 442 ScienceMediaNL
Can conservation save our ocean? | The Economist
 
27:05
The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G3TH9d The crew of this ship is on a mission to try and save one of the most endangered sea creatures on the planet. They’re in the middle of a marine protected area in Mexico - a conservation zone where certain types of fishing are banned. Local fishermen are poaching a species of fish that is so highly prized in China, they can make tens of thousands of dollars in just one night. With ocean life under threat from overfishing, pollution and climate change, could marine protected areas be the answer? Near the Mexican fishing town of San Felipe, on the The Upper Gulf of California... Conservation group, Sea Shepherd is working with the authorities to help enforce a Marine Protected Area - or MPA. A designated section of ocean to be conserved, managed and protected. Maintaining rich, diverse ecosystems is key for the health of the Ocean - and ultimately the survival of humanity. But ocean life is under threat. From plants to micro-organisms and animals, species are disappearing forever. Marine Biologist Patricia Gandolfo and the rest of the Sea Shepherd crew are here to stop poachers. Caught up in the nets of the criminal gangs and local fishermen is one particularly rare porpoise - the Vaquita. Worldwide there are thousands of sea species currently threatened with extinction. Losing just one species from the food chain can have a disastrous effect on an entire ecosystem. After it’s sold on, the Totoaba’s swim bladder can fetch up to $100,000 a kilo in China, where it’s prized for its medicinal properties. Critics disapprove of Sea Shepherds use of direct-action tactics in some of their campaigns, but in the Gulf of California, their presence is welcomed by the Mexican government. Globally, the fishing industry employs 260 million people, but many more subsistence fishermen depend on the ocean for their income. Local fisherman here claim protecting the ocean has limited how they can fish, destroying their way of life. Yet doing nothing may ultimately present more of a threat to their livelihoods. Currently Marine Protected Areas make up only 3.6% of the world’s ocean but a growing number of scientists are calling for 30% to be protected by 2030. Cabo Pulmo now has a thriving eco-tourism and diving industry. The environmental rewards provided by the MPA to the local community have been valued at millions of dollars a year - Far more than they ever made from fishing. The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Marine protected areas can come in many forms. But if they are to be effective, they must align the need for conservation with the needs of those who depend on the ocean for survival. In order to avoid disaster–and to ensure a sustainable supply of fish for the future–far more of our ocean needs urgent protection. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G4unAb Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G3AV1E Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G3TJOn Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G5cEIU Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G43hZY
Views: 36633 The Economist
2016 - Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas Operations - Dr. Larry Wolk
 
29:28
CDPHE What we know and don't know about the health and environmental impacts of oil and gas operations - Dr. Larry Wolk, Executive Director, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 2016 Energy & Environment Symposium - Oil and Gas Education for Local Government - Produced By Colorado Mesa University and Garfield County Thursday, April 21, 2016 - Grand River Hospital District - Rifle, CO
The Devastating Effects of Pollution in China (Part 1/2)
 
13:58
We went to the single most polluted place on earth, the coal-mining town of Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, where kids play in dirty rivers and the sun sets early behind a thick curtain of smog. Watch part 2 here: http://bit.ly/Toxic-China-2 Check out "Toxic: America's Water Crisis" here: http://bit.ly/Water-Crisis-1 Check out the Best of VICE here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Best-Of Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 2049921 VICE
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific
 
24:57
Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
Views: 11504 Steve Menzies
Seabed mining temporarily banned
 
00:53
A moratorium on seabed mining has been placed on the NT's coastal waters to allow for an environmental impact assessment to be completed.
How One of NASA’s Deep Space Challenges Could Be Solved in the Ocean | The Swim
 
05:14
A long-distance swimmer and a NASA astronaut have some surprising things in common, including the quest to protect their bones from deteriorating. This Is the Engineering You'd Need to Cross the Pacific Ocean - https://youtu.be/4nEV76CpF6M Follow The Swim on Seeker's website http://www.seeker.com/theswim Follow Ben on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/BenLecomteTheSwim/ Read More A 51-year-old just began a 5,500-mile swim across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to San Francisco http://www.businessinsider.com/swimmer-crossing-the-pacific-ocean-2018-5 "Throughout the entire trip, Lecomte and the boat accompanying him on the journey plan to collect samples and test the water, looking for everything from contamination from the Fukushima incident to the presence of microplastics in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch." Fishing For Answers on Bone Loss in Space https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/medaka_studies “The fish in space showed normal body growth even though they had decreased mineral density in bones and teeth. The investigators observed the fish regularly and while the Medaka swam normally at first, they tended to become motionless late in the flight. This indicates that microgravity’s effect on bone density likely involves changes in mechanical force that lowers overall physical activity and therefore causes osteoclast activation.” The scoop on how mouse poop might get humans to Mars https://www.popsci.com/space-mouse-poop-mars “Despite the trickier conditions, astronauts will acquire a precious poo pellet from each mouse every two weeks. They’ll measure each creature’s mass and bone density at least twice over the course of the experiment, draw blood, and film their habitat for three 48-hour periods too. Then, at the end of 30 days, they’ll “process” 10 of the mice (a polite euphemism for euthanasia and dissection). The surviving 10 will live on for another two months before making the same sacrifice.” ____________________ Ben Lecomte’s historic 5,500-mile swim from Japan to San Francisco is a feat that can’t be missed. Join us as we dive into the most extensive data set of the Pacific Ocean ever collected. Learn about the technology the Seeker crew is using to deter sharks away from Ben and measure the impact of the long-distance swim on his mind and body. Ben's core mission is to raise awareness for ocean health issues, so we’ll investigate key topics such as pollution and plastics as he swims closer to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, discover potential consequences from climate change, and examine how factors like ocean currents can impact his progress along the way. Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Discovery on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Discovery/ Nomadica Films http://www.nomadicafilms.com/
Views: 54585 Seeker
PNG DEEP SEA MINING BBC NEWS AT TEN
 
04:40
Plans for the world's first deep sea mine are taking shape in the waters off Papua New Guinea. The ocean floor is rich in gold, copper and other minerals in big demand around the world. But some scientists warn that digging up the seabed will destroy marine life, and Sir David Attenborough is among those objecting. BBC News science editor David Shukman reports.
Views: 2779 David Shukman
DSM Out Of Darkness
 
00:31
Documentary focuses on environmental impacts of deep sea mining in the Pacific.
Views: 33 Pacific Community
David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015
 
24:20
Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling problem; Need for consistent funding of deep-sea research. David Billett, PhD in Deep-sea Ecology at the University of Southampton, is the Managing Director at Deep Seas Environmental Solutions and a Visiting Research Fellow at the National Oceanography Centre. His work focuses in finding solutions for the use of ocean resources and the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems. 00:08 Research focus 02:33 About the ISA 06:34 Types of deep-sea minerals 11:57 Technology for deep-sea exploration and exploitation 12:44 Science-industry cooperation 15:03 Public outreach 16:56 Deep-sea mining 19:56 Decision-making process: the ISA case 21:50 Challenges for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 143 SOPHIA
Human impacts on Biodiversity | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
04:29
Biodiversity is the variety of life. There are thought to be 8.7 million species on planet Earth. And, as we saw in this video, biodiversity is of utmost importance to humans. The loss of one key species can have a detrimental impact on many levels; from other species of animals to plants to the physical environment, as shown by wolves. Human activities are reducing biodiversity. Our future depends upon maintaining a good level of biodiversity, and so we need to start taking measures to try and stop the reduction. In this video we are going to look at how humans are negatively impacting biodiversity. As the world population has grown from 1.5 billion in 1900 to nearly 7.5 billion people today, unsurprisingly the land use has changed. Habitats have been destroyed in favour of agriculture, forestry, fishing, urbanisation and manufacturing. Unsurprisingly, habitat loss has greatly reduced the species richness. Habitat fragmentation has also meant that populations have been split into smaller subunits, which then when faced with challenging circumstances have not been able to adapt and survive. After habitat loss, overharvesting has had a huge effect on biodiversity. Humans historically exploit plant and animal species for short-term profit. If a resource is profitable, we develop more efficient methods of harvesting it, inevitably depleting the resource. As is currently happening with fishing and logging. The exploited species then needs protection. The difficulty is that the demand then outstrips the supply, and so the resource value rises. This increases the incentive to extract the resource and leads to the final collapse of the population. As happened with whales, elephants, spotted cats, cod, tuna and many more species. Human activities are polluting the air and water. Toxic discharge into the water from industrial processes unsurprisingly has a negative effect on the local aquatic species by killing, weakening or affecting their ability to reproduce. Phosphorous and nitrogen in fertilisers run-off agricultural fields and pass into rivers. These surplus nutrients cause algae to bloom, which then starves other aquatic species of oxygen and light, causing them to die. Acid rain is one consequence of humans polluting the air. This causes lakes and water bodies to become more acidic, killing off fish, molluscs, amphibians and many other species. Huge impact humans have had on planet Earth is the introduction of alien species to habitats. In fact, it is estimated that on any given day there are 3000 species in transit aboard ocean-going vessels! Alien species can cause problems in a number of ways… pause the video and have a look. Throughout the earth’s history there have been periods of rapid climate change, that have led to mass extinction events. We are currently in a period of fluctuating climate, but nearly all scientists agree that human activities, like burning fossil fuels, are speeding up global warming. We don’t know how much climate change is going to affect biodiversity in future, but it’s predicted to be huge. Loss of sea ice and ocean acidification are already causing huge reductions in biodiversity. Climate change alters temperature and weather patterns, with changing patterns of rainfall and drought expected to have significant impacts on biodiversity. So there we have a selection of human-related impacts on biodiversity. There are much more, which a quick search on the internet will bring up. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Gulf Oil Spill Effects On Wildlife
 
05:08
http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... What are and will be the effects of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill on the wildlife in the area? --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker • http://www.youtube.com/RationalHumanism --- Scientists to study impact of gulf oil spill on marine food webs Shells from oysters, clams, and periwinkles hold clues about the ways and rates at which harmful compounds from the spill are being incorporated into the Gulf's marine food web. New reports are surfacing every day about the immediate impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Gulf Coast wildlife, especially as the oil reaches the sensitive marshlands along the coast. But how will these communities be affected over time? Scientists currently know very little about how long it takes for the hydrocarbons and heavy metals in crude oil to work their way through marine food webs. To address this issue, California Academy of Sciences researcher Peter Roopnarine is working with Laurie Anderson from Louisiana State University and David Goodwin from Denison University to collect and analyze three different types of mollusks from the Gulf Coast. These animals are continually building their shells, and if contaminants are present in their environment, they can incorporate those compounds into their shells. Roopnarine and his colleagues will study growth rings in the shells - much like scientists would study tree rings - to determine how quickly harmful compounds from the oil become incorporated into the animals' homemade armor. They will also sample tissues from the animals over the next four months to test for hydrocarbons, and will measure changes in growth rate and survivorship. In addition to its value in informing conservation and policy decisions, this research will have direct implications for the region's commercial oyster fisheries. • http://www.calacademy.org/sciencetoday/ • http://www.calacademy.org/newsroom/releases/2010/roopnarine_oil_spill.php --- NASA Satellites' View of Gulf Oil Spill Over Time Two NASA satellites are capturing images of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which began April 20, 2010, with the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. This series of images reveals a space-based view of the burning oil rig and the ensuing oil spill, through May 24. The imagery comes from the MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. The oil slick appears grayish-beige in these images. The shape of the spill changes due to weather conditions, currents and the use of oil-dispersing chemicals. The images in this video were selected to show the spill most clearly. The full image archive is available at http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov. For more information and imagery about the oil spill, visit NASA's Oil Spill website. Imagery and information about the oil spill is also available on NASA's Earth Observatory Natural Hazards website. • http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/oilspill/index.html • http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards . gulf mexico coast oil spill effects bp deepwater horizon rig impacts studies marine food web wildlife animals shells oysters sea turtles environment scientists calacademy nasa satellites
Views: 126703 ScienceMagazine
Jeff Ardron on the prospects for deep-sea mining - DSBS 2015
 
02:24
Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Hydrothermal vent fields; Main knowledge gaps; Deep-sea mining; Funding perspectives for deep-sea research. Jeff Ardron holds an MSc in Environment and Management by the Royal Roads University and is an Adviser on Ocean Governance at the Commonwealth Secretariat, London, and the co-founder and President of the Board for PacMARA. His research focuses on deep sea mining concerning transparency of resource governance. 00:16 Main knowledge gaps 01:24 Prospects for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 67 SOPHIA
Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic
 
03:05
What causes climate change (also known as global warming)? And what are the effects of climate change? Learn the human impact and consequences of climate change for the environment, and our lives. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic https://youtu.be/G4H1N_yXBiA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 418934 National Geographic
Bronwen Currie on deep-sea mining and the need for science–policy interface - DSBS 2015
 
04:56
Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Deep-sea mining (knowledge gaps, potential impacts); Deep-sea science with and for society; Need for science-policy interface; Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI). Bronwen Currie is a Senior Scientist at the Swakopmund Coastal Research Institute of the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources. Her research focuses on coastal ecology, with an emphasis on the northern Benguela upwelling system. 00:24 Deep-sea mining 02:51 Science–policy interface and public outreach 04:09 Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI) SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 130 SOPHIA
Deep-sea scientists on the impacts of mining and the need for more research - DSBS 2015
 
22:12
Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Deep-sea mining impacts: preliminary results from MIDAS; Need for science-industry collaboration; High biodiversity in the deep ocean: results from ABYSSLINE at the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone; Need for further fundamental deep-sea research (knowledge gaps; deep-sea taxonomy; science-policy interface; EIA; sustainable management planning; scientists as governance advisors); Scientific collaboration and data sharing; Increasing needs of the research community: the Portuguese case (capacity building; science funding; resource investment); Public perceptions on the deep-sea; Population connectivity. 00:08 Deep-sea mining impacts: results from MIDAS 03:03 Need for science-industry collaboration 04:54 Deep-sea biodiversity: results from ABYSSLINE 07:27 Need for fundamental deep-sea science 12:24 Prospects for deep-sea research 15:50 Increasing needs of the scientific community 20:23 Public perceptions on the deep-sea 21:16 High biodiversity in the deep ocean Ana Colaço, PhD in Ecology and Biosystematics by the University of Lisbon, is a Principal Investigator at MARE-Azores-IMAR. Her research focuses on hydrothermal vents ecosystems, and trophic relationships on seamounts. Craig Smith (at the middle) is a Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii and the Principal investigator of the Benthic-Ecology Lab at this University. His research focuses on deep-sea biodiversity, disturbance ecology, and human impacts in seafloor ecosystems. Adrian Glover (on the right) is a Research Leader in the Life Sciences Department of the Natural History Museum, London and a Visiting Researcher at the University of Southampton. His research focuses on deep-sea biodiversity, Antarctic biodiversity, annelid evolution and ecology. SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
Views: 149 SOPHIA
The Environmental Costs of Fishing - Perspectives on Ocean Science
 
48:31
Join Paul Dayton, co-author of the recent Pew Oceans Commission report on Ecological Effects of Fishing, for an eye opening view of the profound consequences fishing can have on marine ecosystems and the types of protection and restoration needed to improve these critically stressed environments. Series: Perspectives on Ocean Science [10/2003] [Science] [Show ID: 7382]
Mining
 
06:51
019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 62567 Bozeman Science
The Impact of Oil Sands Mining on Ocean Ecosystems
 
03:38
COS early career science fellow Stephanie Green discusses her recent collaborative research on the potential impacts of oil sands mining on coastal and marine environments. In a new paper, Green and colleagues describe 15 types of potential impacts and investigate how much we know about each of them.
Experimental Seabed Mining - Coming to a Coastline Near YOU!
 
02:31
Donate: http://actnowpng.org/donate Share on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1l93esG Share on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1l93kk6 Papua New Guinea has already suffered some of the worlds worst mining disasters . Foreign companies have polluted our rivers, destroyed communities and caused a violent civil war. Now Nautilus Minerals wants to dig up the seafloor in a new experimental mining operation. But, as the government has already acknowledged, communities all across PNG are saying they do not want to be part of this experiment. But this issue is of much wider significance than just Solwara 1 and Papua New Guinea. There is already exploration for similar mines all across the Pacific region and in the Indian ocean. Numerous countries have sanctioned the exploration without understanding the full potential environmental impacts and how it could impact on local communities. NGOs and communities are calling for a moratorium on this type of mining, like that already in place in Vanuatu, until there are proper studies on the environmental and social costs. The timing of the video is very poignant as the PNG government struggles with the issue of whether to put $118 million of tax payers money into the Solwara 1 mine: money the NGOs say could be better spent on improving health and education facilities for communities in PNG. Governments needs to do the right thing for their people rather than looking after these foreign companies that destroy and impoverish us. Governments must reject seabed mining and invest instead in health, education and agriculture for the long-term benefit of our communities. This animation was lovingly crafted by Ample Earth: http://AmpleEarth.com
Views: 5409 Act Now
Ashley Rowden/ NIWA - ‘Deep-sea research is constrained by funding issues’
 
05:23
'There are definitely concerns about what mankind is doing in terms of disturbing the deep-sea floor with fishing and mining; and we really got to get the better grips on how we’re going to manage that' // Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). 00:18 About the DSBS 01:37 Deep-sea definition 02:04 Opportunities from DSBS 02:27 Students participation 03:12 Feedback on the DSBS 03:48 Key issues: human impacts in the deep-sea 04:40 Prospects for deep-sea research: funding Ashley Rowden is a Principal Scientist for marine benthic ecology at the National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research in New Zealand. His research focuses on the ecology of deep-sea communities at a variety of habitats including seamounts, vents, seeps, canyons and trenches. SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015
Views: 42 SOPHIA
Offshore oil drilling: Concern over NZ's lack of environmental standards
 
02:14
Following Energy Resource Minister Simon Bridges' warning to offshore protesters, opposition has emerged from Māori environmentalist Mike Smith, against major oil company Anadarko's deep sea oil drilling. He says there are flaws within NZ's legislation regarding oil exploration.
Views: 485 Te Karere TVNZ
BSEE Marine Trash and Debris Update
 
09:46
The BSEE Gulf of Mexico Region has developed a new marine training video focusing on the elimination of debris associated with oil and gas operations on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS).Check it out here: www.BSEE.gov/debris
Views: 5165 BSEE GOV
Scientists meet to discuss deep sea trawling
 
01:01
Scientists have met in Paris to discuss endangered marine species. Deep sea trawling was one of the problems prioritised at the conference. Duration: 01:00
Views: 781 AFP news agency
Where Is The Biggest Garbage Dump On Earth?
 
04:04
Even though 80% of trash starts on land, tons of it ends up in the ocean, swirling around in a massive patch of plastic debris. Learn more at HowStuffWorks.com: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/clean-up-garbage-patch.htm Share on Facebook: http://goo.gl/wtvaSo Share on Twitter: http://goo.gl/bpsg3V Subscribe: http://goo.gl/ZYI7Gt Visit our site: http://www.brainstuffshow.com SOURCES: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/earth/oceanography/great-pacific-garbage-patch.htm http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/encyclopedia/great-pacific-garbage-patch/?ar_a=1 http://marinedebris.noaa.gov/info/patch.html AN OCEAN OF TRASH. Scholastic Action, 01633570, 4/5/2010, Vol. 33, Issue 12 FLOATING JUNKYARD. By: Norlander, Britt, Science World, 10411410, 4/19/2010, Vol. 66, Issue 13 AN OCEAN OF PLASTIC. By: Doucette, Kitt, Rolling Stone, 0035791X, 10/29/2009, Issue 1090