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Cryptography Research
 
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Cryptography Research IBM and the Future of Cyber Security By 2011, the world will be 10 times more instrumented than it was in 2006. Internet connected devices will leap from 500 Million to 1 Trillion. Approximately 70% of the digital universe is created by individuals, but enterprises are responsible for 85% of the security, privacy, reliability, and compliance. Increasingly, the proliferation of data-generating sensors and mobile computing devices, and the emergence of new forms of communication such as social networking, are driving unprecedented growth in the collection, storage and management of all types of data. Not surprisingly, this phenomenon has sparked growing demand for the ability to extract intelligence from these massive mountains of information—intelligence that can enable organizations to improve their decision-making and run their businesses more effectively and efficiently. With this capacity to rapidly sift thru data and gain new insights comes a significant challenge and responsibility when it comes to personal information, or information that relates to identifiable individuals: how to enable the exchange and analysis of data, while protecting privacy. IBM has long recognized the importance of information privacy and led by example in its own privacy polices and practices: the company was the first multinational to adopt a global privacy policy in the late 1960s, and continued that leadership as recently as 2005 when it was the first company to address genetic privacy. But policies and practices are not enough on their own to address the privacy challenges of an increasingly smarter planet. Thoughtfully-designed technologies can play a key role here, part of a paradigm that some are calling Privacy by Design. As the world becomes smarter and more interconnected, the capacity to rapidly sift through data to gain new insights brings with it a significant challenge and responsibility when it comes to personal information. How do we enable the exchange and analysis of data, while protecting privacy? IBM, which in the 1960s because the first multinational to adopt a global privacy policy and in 2005 was the first to address genetic privacy, has long recognized the importance of information privacy. Leading by example in its own privacy polices and practices, IBM has also received many patents for inventions that support our commitment to privacy leadership. For example, an IBM Researcher has solved a thorny mathematical problem that has confounded scientists since the invention of public-key encryption several decades ago. The breakthrough, called "privacy homomorphism," or "fully homomorphic encryption," makes possible the deep and unlimited analysis of encrypted information -- data that has been intentionally scrambled -- without sacrificing confidentiality. IBM's solution, formulated by IBM Researcher Craig Gentry, uses a mathematical object called an "ideal lattice," and allows people to fully interact with encrypted data in ways previously thought impossible. With the breakthrough, computer vendors storing the confidential, electronic data of others will be able to fully analyze data on their clients' behalf without expensive interaction with the client, and without seeing any of the private data. With Gentry's technique, the analysis of encrypted information can yield the same detailed results as if the original data was fully visible to all. Using the solution could help strengthen the business model of "cloud computing," where a computer vendor is entrusted to host the confidential data of others in a ubiquitous Internet presence. It might better enable a cloud computing vendor to perform computations on clients' data at their request, such as analyzing sales patterns, without exposing the original data. Other potential applications include enabling filters to identify spam, even in encrypted email, or protecting information contained in electronic medical records. The breakthrough might also one day enable computer users to retrieve information from a search engine with more confidentiality http://asmarterplanet.com/
Views: 13380 Social Media
Cybersecurity: Crash Course Computer Science #31
 
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Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. Check out Computerphile’s wonderful video on how to choose a password! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NjQ9b3pgIg Pre-order our limited edition Crash Course: Computer Science Floppy Disk Coasters here! https://store.dftba.com/products/computer-science-coasters Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 362574 CrashCourse
Privacy, Security, and Cryptography
 
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Launchpad Accelerator Engineer Bootcamp 2018 → http://bit.ly/2G1w5py Ananth Raghunathan is a computer scientist broadly interested in cryptography, security, and machine learning. At Google, he works in the security and privacy research team in Google Brain on differential privacy, applied crypto, and topics at the intersection of security and machine learning. About Launchpad Accelerator: Launchpad Accelerator is an acceleration program for the world’s top startups. Founders work closely with Google and Alphabet product teams and experts to solve specific technical challenges and optimize their businesses for growth with machine learning. Accelerator Startups are selected to be a part of the four month product acceleration program. Each startup is paired with a Google product manager to accelerate their product development, working alongside Google’s ML research and development teams. Learn more at → https://goo.gl/qFTrKD About Accelerator’s Engineering Bootcamp: Accelerator’s Engineering Bootcamp brings together each startup’s project team for a four-day event in San Francisco to learn best practices in experimenting, building, and implementing advanced tech within their startup. The teams are composed of Founders and VPs along with developers, data scientists, and product managers. Watch more in this playlist → http://bit.ly/2G1w5py Subscribe to Launchpad to learn all about startups → http://bit.ly/Launchpad9
Will Quantum Computers break encryption?
 
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How do you secure messages over the internet? How do quantum computers break it? How do you fix it? Why don't you watch the video to find out? Why does this description have so many questions? Why are you still reading? What is the meaning of life? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frameofessence Twitter: https://twitter.com/frameofessence YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/frameofessence CLARIFICATIONS: You don't actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7:04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can't be broken by quantum computers. CORRECTIONS: [2:18] Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there's a specific way to use them that's useful, which is what's shown in the video. [5:36] In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by "private key", neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the "private key" actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3447#appendix-A.1.2 ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can't get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it. Video links: Encryption and HUGE numbers - Numberphile https://youtu.be/M7kEpw1tn50 The No Cloning Theorem - minutephysics https://youtu.be/owPC60Ue0BE Quantum Entanglement & Spooky Action at a Distance - Veritasium https://youtu.be/ZuvK-od647c Sources: Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists http://books.google.ca/books/about/Quantum_Computing_for_Computer_Scientist.html?id=eTT0FsHA5DAC Random person talking about Quantum MITM attacks http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/2719/is-quantum-key-distribution-safe-against-mitm-attacks-too The Ekert Protocol (i.e. E91) http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~nilic/Nina's-article.pdf Annealing vs. Universal Quantum Computers https://medium.com/quantum-bits/what-s-the-difference-between-quantum-annealing-and-universal-gate-quantum-computers-c5e5099175a1 Images, Documents, and Screenshots: Post-Quantum Cryptography initiatives http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/post-quantum-crypto/cfp-announce-dec2016.html http://pqcrypto.eu.org/docs/initial-recommendations.pdf Internet map (Carna Botnet) http://census2012.sourceforge.net/ Quantum network maps https://www.slideshare.net/ADVAOpticalNetworking/how-to-quantumsecure-optical-networks http://www.secoqc.net/html/press/pressmedia.html IBM Quantum http://research.ibm.com/ibm-q/ Music: YouTube audio library: Blue Skies Incompetech: Jay Jay Pamgaea The House of Leaves Premium Beat: Cutting Edge Technology Second Time Around Swoosh 1 sound effect came from here: http://soundbible.com/682-Swoosh-1.html ...and is under this license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/sampling+/1.0/
Views: 557410 Frame of Essence
Cloud Security and Privacy
 
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Kristin Lauter chairs this session at Faculty Summit 2011, which includes the following presentations. - Cryptographic Cloud Storage and ServicesΓÇöKristin Lauter, Microsoft Research - Encryption as Access Control for Cloud SecurityΓÇöCarl Gunter, University of Illinois - The Economics of Cloud Computing: Why a Brooklyn Latte Buys a Million Unforgettable SignaturesΓÇöRadu Sion, Stony Brook University
Views: 700 Microsoft Research
Why the NSA is breaking our encryption -- and why we should care | Matthew Green | TEDxMidAtlantic
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Encryption dates back to the Founding Fathers and the Bill of Rights. Now, the United States National Security Agency is breaking and undermining core encryption technologies that power the Internet, saying it's being done for our own protection from terrorists. But are we sacrificing our freedoms for fear? Matthew Green is an Assistant Research Professor of Computer Science at the Johns Hopkins University. His research focuses on computer security and cryptography, and particularly the way that cryptography can be used to promote individual privacy. His work includes techniques to securely access medical databases, enhance the anonymity of Bitcoin, and to analyze deployed security systems. Prior to joining the Johns Hopkins faculty he served as a Senior Technical Staff Member at AT&T Laboratories. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 136283 TEDx Talks
Introduction to Computer Security - Information Security Lesson #1 of 12
 
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Dr. Soper provides an introduction to computer security. Topics covered include dependence on technology, information assets, threats, vulnerabilities, controls, confidentiality, integrity, availability, types of attackers, methods of defense, and multi-layered security.
Views: 421638 Dr. Daniel Soper
Security and Privacy of Machine Learning
 
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Ian Goodfellow, Staff Research Scientist, Google Brain Machine learning is a powerful new tool that can be used for security applications (for example, to detect malware) but machine learning itself introduces many new attack surfaces. For example, attackers can control the output of machine learning models by manipulating their inputs or training data. In this session, I give an overview of the emerging field of machine learning security and privacy. Learning Objectives: 1: Learn about vulnerabilities of machine learning. 2: Explore existing defense techniques (differential privacy). 3: Understand opportunities to join research effort to make new defenses. https://www.rsaconference.com/videos/security-and-privacy-of-machine-learning
Views: 1101 RSA Conference
Current Topics in Cybersecurity
 
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The 21st century is characterized by the use of the Internet for our personal and professional daily lives. National security depends on a stable, safe and resilient cyberspace. We rely on this vast array of networks to communicate, socialize, network, travel, automate our homes, run the world economy, and provide many government programs and services. Unfortunately, cyber intrusions and attacks have increased dramatically during the past decade, exposing sensitive personal and business information, disrupting critical business operations and disrupting economies. Get an overview of cybersecurity from multiple perspectives in this timely lecture.
Views: 2660 UC Berkeley Extension
What is Cyber Security? | Introduction to Cyber Security | Cyber Security Training | Edureka
 
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** Cyber Security Course : https://www.edureka.co/cybersecurity-certification-training ** This Edureka video on "What is Cyber Security" gives an introduction to the Cyber Security world and talks about its basic concepts. You get to know different kinds of attack in today's IT world and how cybersecurity is the solution to these attacks. Below are the topics covered in this tutorial: 1. Why we need Cyber Security? 2. What is Cyber Security? 3. The CIA Triad 4. Vulnerability, Threat and Risk 5. Cognitive Cyber Security Cybersecurity Training Playlist: https://bit.ly/2NqcTQV Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. #edureka #cybersecurity #cybersecurity_training #What_is_cybersecurity ------------------------------------------------ About Edureka Cyber Security Training Cybersecurity is the combination of processes, practices, and technologies designed to protect networks, computers, programs, data and information from attack, damage or unauthorized access. Edureka’s Cybersecurity Certification Course will help you in learning about the basic concepts of Cybersecurity along with the methodologies that must be practiced ensuring information security of an organization. Starting from the Ground level Security Essentials, this course will lead you through Cryptography, Computer Networks & Security, Application Security, Data & Endpoint Security, idAM (Identity & Access Management), Cloud Security, Cyber-Attacks and various security practices for businesses. ------------------------------------------------ Why Learn Cyber Security? Cybersecurity is the gathering of advances that procedures and practices expected to ensure systems, PCs, projects and information from assault, harm or unapproved get to. In a processing setting, security incorporates both cybersecurity and physical security, it is imperative since cyberattackers can without much of a stretch take and obliterate the profoundly grouped data of governments, defense offices and banks for which the results are huge so it is essential to have an appropriate innovation which an avoid digital wrongdoings. --------------------------------------------------- Objectives of Edureka Cyber Security Course This course is designed to cover a holistic & a wide variety of foundational topics of the cybersecurity domain which will be helpful to lead freshers as well as IT professional having 1 to 2 years of experience, into the next level of choice such as ethical hacking/ audit & compliance / GRC/ Security Architecture and so on This course focuses mainly on the basics concepts of Cyber Security In this course, we are going to deal with Ground level security essentials cryptography, computer networks & security, application security, data & endpoint security, idAM (identity & access management), cloud security, cyber-attacks and various security practices for businesses This course will be your first step towards learning Cyber Security -------------------------------------- Who Should go for this Training? Anyone having the zeal to learn innovative technologies can take up this course. Especially, students and professionals aspiring to make a career in the Cybersecurity technology. However, Cybersecurity Certification Course is best suited for the below mentioned profiles:- Networking Professionals Linux Administrators ----------------------------------------------- For more information, Please write back to us at [email protected] or call us at IND: 9606058406 / US: 18338555775 (toll free). Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/edureka_learning/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/edurekaIN/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/edurekain LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/edureka
Views: 147769 edureka!
Gaby Lenhart - Cryptography, privacy and security
 
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Hear from Gaby Lenhart, Senior Research Officer for the European Telecommunications Standards Institute about the importance of standardization and security. Lenhart visiting IQC for PQCrypto 2014, the 6th international conference on post-quantum cryptography (https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/). Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-quantum-computing/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
Principles of Computer Security - George Danezis
 
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Principles of Computer Security, by George Danezis The opening lecture of SecAppDev 2014 by George Danezis on the foundational principles of computer security. Computer security: do the right thing in the face of a well-resourced strategic adversary. George Danezis is a Reader in Security and Privacy Engineering at the Department of Computer Science of University College London. He has been working on anonymous communications, privacy enhancing technologies (PET), and traffic analysis since 2000. He has previously been a researcher for Microsoft Research, Cambridge; a visiting fellow at K.U.Leuven (Belgium); and a research associate at the University of Cambridge (UK), where he also completed his doctoral dissertation under the supervision of Prof. R.J. Anderson. His theoretical contributions to the PET field include the established information theoretic metric for anonymity and pioneering the study of statistical attacks against anonymity systems. On the practical side he is one of the lead designers of the anonymous mail system Mixminion, and has worked on the traffic analysis of deployed protocols such as Tor. His current research interests focus around smart grid privacy, peer-to-peer and social network security, as well as the application of machine learning techniques to security problems. He has published over 50 peer-reviewed scientific papers on these topics in international conferences and journals. He was the co-program chair of ACM Computer and Communications Security Conference in 2011 and 2012, IFCA Financial Cryptography and Data Security in 2011, the Privacy Enhancing Technologies Workshop in 2005 and 2006. He sits on the PET Symposium board and he regularly serves in program committees of leading conferences in the field of privacy and security.
Views: 3058 secappdev.org
The 7th Winter School: Introduction to Differential Privacy, Randomized Response, Basic Properties
 
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The 7th BIU Winter School on Cryptography- Differential Privacy: From Theory to Practice, which was held on February 12-16, 2017
The Internet Exposed: Encryption, Backdoors and Privacy – and the Quest to Maintain Trust
 
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This video is a production of the Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society (ISOC-DC http://www.isoc-dc.org/), produced and directed by Paul Brigner and David Vyorst. It premiered at the Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference on October 14, 2015. It is meant to be a starting point for discussions about #encryption, #privacy, and #cybersecurity. We intend to use this video to frame panel discussions, webinars, research, and conversations. For more information, contact the producers at [email protected] Executive Producer: Paul Brigner Produced by David Vyorst & Paul Brigner Directed by David Vyorst Edited by Adrian Muys & Paul Brigner Animation & Graphics by Sareen Hairabedian Camera: Paul Brigner Gary Griffin Kevin Barbour Funding Provided by The Internet Society
Stanford Seminar: Challenges in Secure Messaging
 
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EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Challenges in Secure Messaging Joseph Bonneau, Stanford University and EFF The post-Snowden era has seen a surge of interest in end-to-end encrypted communications as a technical safeguard against mass surveillance. This talk will survey the modern landscape of tools available and discuss challenges in technical and social challenges to widespread end-to-end encrypted communications. The talk will build on the speaker's experience working with the Electronic Frontier Foundation to promote secure messaging tools and explain their properties to the public, as well as his technical work developing the CONIKS protocol for distributing keys. About the Speaker: Joseph Bonneau is postdoctoral researcher at Stanford. He received his BS and MS degrees from Stanford and his PhD from the University of Cambridge. He has worked for the Electronic Frontier Foundation as well Google, Yahoo, and Cryptography Research, Inc. Speaker Abstract and Bio can be found here: http://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/161130.html Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 1927 stanfordonline
Cryptography in a post-Snowden era - Bart Preneel
 
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This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, we discuss the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. Learning objectives + Understand how sophisticated opponents agencies can undermine cryptographic protection + Understand how to maximize your chances to resist sophisticated opponents using cryptographic techniques This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2016, Leuven, Belgium Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the iMinds COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He has authored more than 400 scientific publications and is inventor of five patents. He teaches cryptology, network security and discete algebra at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), DTU (Denmark) and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standaridzation . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 878 secappdev.org
Cryptographic and Information Security in the Post-Snowden Era - Bart Preneel
 
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This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, we discuss the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. This lecture was delivered at SecAppDev 2015 in Leuven. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the iMinds COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He has authored more than 400 scientific publications and is inventor of five patents. He teaches cryptology, network security and discete algebra at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), DTU (Denmark) and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standaridzation . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 527 secappdev.org
Alma Whitten on 'Lessons from Googles Approach to Internet Security, Privacy and Encryption'
 
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About the Speaker: Dr. Alma Whitten joined Google in 2003 and is currently Head of Googles Applied Security engineering team, and their engineering lead on privacy. Dr Whittens work at Google revolves primarily in the realm of security and protection of Googles log data. Alma was awarded a PhD and an M.S. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Connecticut. Dr Whittens doctoral research focussed on creating a methodology for designing computer security that is manageable by ordinary computer users. As well as her presentation today, Dr Whitten has delivered several presentations in her capacity as Google privacy spokesperson. Topics of discussion have included: Are IP addresses personal?, and HTTPS security for web applications. Prior to todays IIEA event, Dr Whitten recently delivered a privacy presentation at the first ever Google Brussels Tech Talk for policy makers on January 28th of this year. The title of that presentation was An engineers vision for Internet Privacy. About the Presentation: Policy makers across the digital spectrum are increasingly beginning to discuss the concept of privacy by design. Privacy by design seeks to address the pertinent question of whether privacy represents an impediment to innovation in technology, or is innovation in technology the means for users to protect their privacy online? Dr. Whitten, in todays presentation to the IIEA, discussed some of these issues. Conscious of their important role as information custodian and data steward, Dr Whitten emphasised how Google has always sought to make user control of their privacy preferences a cornerstone of Googles product development. Dr Whitten also outlined some of the key developments that have emerged from Googles 2009 Privacy Initiatives Program. Developments cited by Alma included: Googles Privacy Dashboard which offers a user-centralised view of data associated with their account; being able to control the ads users see with Google internet-based advertising; the Google Privacy Center; and also the Data Liberation Front. Central to the Data Liberation Front is a team of Google engineers whose goal is to make the user the full controller of any data they store in Google products.
Views: 30217 IIEA1
Privacy and security challenges in today's e-health systems: Danny De Cock at TEDxUHowest
 
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Who Is Danny De Cock? Danny De Cock researches as a post-doc applied cryptography at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium (university name is not to be translated!). Danny is an expert in computer security and industrial cryptography applications and he has conducted extensive research projects in this field. His work includes the analysis and design of identity management systems and secure communications architectures for various environments and communities. He has also researched security aspects of mobile devices, car telematics, home appliances, electronic banking, electronic voting schemes and electronic identity cards. Most recently he was the coordinator of a study for the four Belgian governments to lay out the security architecture and functionality of the electronic voting system for Belgian elections. This system has been deployed for official elections in October 2012. Danny is involved with different identity management projects to increase Belgian eGovernment efficiency on the regional and federal level, and was in charge of the Modinis-IDM study (http://godot.be/modinis) that was organized by the European Commission to build on expertise and initiatives in the EU Member States to progress towards a coherent approach in electronic identity management in eGovernment in the European Union. Danny is the project coordinator of the European Project TAS3 (Trusted Architecture for Securely Shared Services, cf. http://tas3.eu). This project focused on service oriented architectures that deployed in the employability and healthcare sector. He is also inolved in research on computer forensics through the BC-Centre, focusing on the protection of evidence. What is this talk all about? Privacy And Security Challenges In Today's Ehealth Systems In this talk he sketches the aspects that necessitate the protection of data that are exchanged in e-health care systems. He also illustrates how these protection measures can be applied successfully, and why this is not always what we want. About TED and TEDx In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1737 TEDx Talks
Personal VPN Services for Security Overview
 
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Info Level: Beginner Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy Date Created: June 13, 2013 Length of Class: 25:35 Research Assistance: Tracks Security / Data Integrity Prerequisites None Purpose of Class This class teaches students why Personal VPN Services are important, and what to think about when buying them. Class Notes VPN's have been used in corporations for 15 years, but regular people using VPN services is relatively new. Concept -- Personal VPN's allow you to encrypt your data from being sent from your computer to a VPN Server. This prevents hackers from stealing you information when you access the Internet from a public Wifi. Types of Encryption used in VPN's PPTP - Vulnerable IPSec - Enterprise SSL -- Ease of use and theoretically "clientless" When Purchasing VPN Services think about Cost -- Are you paying PER device or for an account for all devices you own? Which Devices Can use the Service Reliability of service and bandwidth that the service can actually provide Security? If I was a CIA Mastermind or Organized Crime Lord I'd invest a few million to setup "free" VPN services and then mine every bit of traffic that went through them. Provides Tunnelbear OkayFreedom Corrections Lab Setup Used in Demonstration N/A Study Guide N/A Resources https://www.tunnelbear.com/ https://www.okayfreedom.com/ http://openvpn.net/index.php/open-source/339-why-ssl-vpn.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_private_network
Views: 93627 Eli the Computer Guy
Careers and Scope for Cyber security  - Skills required, Top recruiters, Job Opportunities
 
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Scope for Cyber security . Go through the career opportunities of Cyber security , Govt jobs and Employment News channel from Freshersworld.com – The No.1 job portal for freshers in India. Visit http://www.freshersworld.com?src=Youtube for detailed career information,job openings of Cyber security . From "ethical hackers" who probe and exploit security vulnerabilities in web based applications and network systems to cryptographers who analyze and decrypt hidden information from cyber terrorists, cyber security professional work hard to ensure data stays out of the wrong hands. Cyber security professionals work in virtually every industry, responding rapidly on real world threats. While there are cyber security associate degree programs, high level careers require an array of technical IT skills and advanced analysis capabilities found in graduate-level degree programs. As per Forbes there was One Million Cyber security Job Openings in the year 2016 across the globe. What are the Careers in Cyber Security? A 4 year course focuses on the array of methods used to protect data and information systems. Students receive training in technical and business skills as database applications, system administration and data recovery. Coursework combines criminal psychology, digital forensics and policy analysis. There are 100s of job titles, but the top positions include: • Security Analyst • Security Architect • Security Software Developer • Security Engineer • A Cryptographer What all you require to become a Cyber Security Expert? 1. Earn a Bachelor’s Degree: Most jobs require a four-year bachelor’s degree in cyber security or a related field such as information technology or computer science. Coursework in programming and statistics combined with classes in ethics and computer forensics prepare students with the technical and analytical skills required for successful careers in cyber security. 2. Complete Advanced Training: Some employers will require candidates to hold an advanced degree such as a master’s degree in cyber security. Prospective employers may offer tuition assistance to meet this goal. 3. Pass Security Clearances (if applicable) : Security clearances are necessary for those who wish to work with classified information as part of a military of government agency. A variety of agencies issue both personnel and facility security clearances, but most are issued by the Department of Defense. Each type of clearance has its own procedures and paperwork. The process, which takes three months to a year, does not begin until an employer decides to hire you, at which point you receive a conditional offer of employment. The first step is to submit clearance documentation, followed by a Background Investigation. Things you should be familiar with: • Penetration Testing which is the act of testing the security of your network, server, website or app. • System Administration • Network Analysis - Your server will often be connected to a network. So it is important to understand the traffic coming in and out of your server. • Quality Code - Since you’re a coder, make sure you use the best security practices when developing your websites or web apps. Never trust user input. • CLI, Terminal, Command Prompt or Powershell - Learning how to work in the Command Line will help you to work faster and more efficiently. Coming to the Scope: • You get to work with the State departments responsible for IT SEC and Cyber Security on national level (such as Indian CSIRT under the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology) • You can apply for jobs at State departments which are responsible for critical infrastructure and its protection. • You can apply for jobs at Ministry of Defence, partially Ministry of Law and Justice, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Ministry of Science and Technology, • Private companies developing, selling or implementing IT SEC or CYBER SEC products. • Universities, faculties of informatics. Freshersworld on an average posts more than 500 jobs on a daily basis and if your dream is to get a secured position in IT sector, we would say log in to www.freshersworld.com and apply for your dream job immediately. For more jobs & career information and daily job alerts, subscribe to our channel and support us. You can also install our Mobile app for govt jobs for getting regular notifications on your mobile. Freshersworld.com is the No.1 job portal for freshers jobs in India. Check Out website for more Jobs & Careers. http://www.freshersworld.com?src=Youtube - ***Disclaimer: This is just a career guidance video for fresher candidates. The name, logo and properties mentioned in the video are proprietary property of the respective companies. The career and job information mentioned are an indicative generalised information. In no way Freshersworld.com, indulges into direct or indirect recruitment process of the respective companies.
Language based techniques for cryptography and privacy
 
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UCL Computer Science Distinguished Lecture A common theme in program verification is establishing relationships between two runs of the same program or of different programs. Such relationships can be proved by semantical means, or with syntactic methods such as relational program logics and product constructions. Gilles shall present an overview of these methods and their applications to provable security, differential privacy, and secure implementations. Gilles Barthe is a research professor at the IMDEA Software Institute. His research interests include logic, formal verification, programming languages, and security. His current work focuses on verification and synthesis methods for cryptography and differential privacy. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Automated Reasoning and Journal of Computer Security. He received a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Manchester, UK, in 1993, and an Habilitation à diriger les recherches in Computer Science from the University of Nice, France, in 2004.
Views: 276 UCLComputerScience
DEF CON 23 - Crypto and Privacy Village - Robert Olson - Teaching Privacy Using Red Team Strategies
 
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"Teaching Privacy Using Red Team Strategies: An Undergraduate General Education Curriculum" Robert Olson (nerdprof) Privacy is very important concept that, unfortunately, many undergraduate students don’t encounter frequently in their chosen courses of study. Often, when it is discussed, it’s discussed using a deeply philosophical approach to which students may have a difficult time connecting. This approach also often fails to connect privacy with many of the important technical nuances that can have a significant impact on modern privacy debates. This talk will discuss an alternative approach used in a Spring 2015 undergraduate general education course titled Hacking, Surveillance, and Privacy. The goal of this class was to take a technical approach to teaching privacy concepts in order to ensure students would understand the technical details of modern privacy debates in an addition to the philosophical concepts. Students were given hands-on experiences with penetration testing tools so that they might better understand how computer security impacts privacy while seeing first-hand how their privacy might be violated. Students were exposed to data-mining techniques so that they might understand the privacy implications of large-scale data collection. Finally, students were exposed to privacy tools so that they might understand the challenges in protecting one’s privacy against modern threats. Robert Olson is currently an instructor in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he teaches courses in security, data mining, and programming. He holds two graduate degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies (Cognitive Science) and Management Information Systems as well as several professional certifications. He has spoken at the Def Con 22 Crypto / Privacy Village, BSides Rochester, and several academic conferences. Most recently, his research has been focused on designing penetration testing agents and exploring new ideas in privacy protecting network protocols.
Views: 1051 DEFCONConference
IOHK | Research Collaborations update. May 2018.
 
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Prof Aggelos Kiayias is the Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. He joins IOHK as chief scientist through a long-term consulting agreement between IOHK and the University of Edinburgh, UK, where he is based and continues to do research and teach courses in cyber security and cryptography. Prof Kiayias is also Professor in Residence (gratis) at the University of Connecticut, USA, and Associate Professor of Cryptography and Security (on leave) at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. Prof Kiayias’s cyber security research over the years has been funded by the Horizon 2020 programme (EU), the European Research Council (EU), the General Secretariat for Research and Technology (Greece), the National Science Foundation (USA), the Department of Homeland Security (USA), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA). He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Athens. He has more than 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. He currently serves as the program chair of the Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2017 conference. -- See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/ Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/
Views: 1044 IOHK
Prof Aggelos Kiayias | Proving the security of blockchain protocols.
 
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Prof Aggelos Kiayias at Shanghai Jiao Tong University | Proving the security of blockchain protocols. A video presentation with Prof Aggelos Kiayias at Shanghai Jiao Tong University & Winter School on Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technologies, Filmed on location in Shanghai January 15th - 17th 2017. Prof Aggelos Kiayias is the Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. He joins IOHK as chief scientist through a long-term consulting agreement between IOHK and the University of Edinburgh, UK, where he is based and continues to do research and teach courses in cyber security and cryptography. Prof Kiayias is also Professor in Residence (gratis) at the University of Connecticut, USA, and Associate Professor of Cryptography and Security (on leave) at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. Prof Kiayias’s cyber security research over the years has been funded by the Horizon 2020 programme (EU), the European Research Council (EU), the General Secretariat for Research and Technology (Greece), the National Science Foundation (USA), the Department of Homeland Security (USA), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA). He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Athens. He has more than 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. He currently serves as the program chair of the Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2017 conference. https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have proven to be a phenomenal success. The underlying blockchain techniques hold a huge promise to change the future of financial transactions, and even our way of computation and collaboration. Both development community and research community have recently made significant progresses. But at the same time, we are facing many challenges. This winter school aims to bring together the communities working on cryptocurrency and blockchain technologies. The target audience is anyone (students, researchers, developers, professionals) with an interest in cryptography and security. The lectures in the school will be given by world leading researchers in this area (such as Professors Jonathan Katz and Aggelos Kiayias - IOHK). All lectures will be self-contained, and we don’t assume the participants to have cryptography background. In this winter school, we will study a comprehensive set of topics about blockchain technologies, including: Bitcoin basics; Analysis of Nakamoto consensus in cryptographic setting and in game-theoretical setting; Ethereum and smart contracts; Alternative approaches to mining and consensus; Scalability; Anonymity. Input Output Founded in 2015 by Charles Hoskinson and Jeremy Wood, IOHK is a technology company committed to using peer-to-peer innovations to provide financial services to the three billion people who don’t have them. Cascading disruption It is the founding principle of IOHK. Cascading disruption is the idea that most of the structures that form the world’s financial, governance and social systems are inherently unstable and thus minor perturbations can cause a ripple effect that fundamentally reconfigures the entire system. Our company is committed to identifying and developing technology to force these perturbations in order to push towards a more fair and transparent order. Projects we work on Currently IOHK is studying new tools and paradigms for cryptographic research and the architecture of cryptocurrencies. More specifically, we are collaboratively developing an open-source library for universal composability and the Scorex project. We also do for-profit work aligned with our mission, vision and goals. The mission of IOHK We view the world as a series of giant and mostly interconnected social graphs with hundreds of complex systems embedded. Our mission is to perturb the graphs to a more connected, transparent and fair configuration for both the flow of ideas and value. Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ Read our papers: http://iohk.link/paper-ouroboros Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/
Views: 1246 IOHK
IOHK | Developing a secure proof of stake algorithm
 
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Prof Aggelos Kiayias is the Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ Developing a secure proof of stake algorithm is one of the big challenges in cryptocurrency, and a proposed solution to this problem won the attention of the academic community. Several hundred cryptographers from around the world arrived at the University of California Santa Barbara on Sunday for the flagship annual event of their field, Crypto 2017. Over several days, they present cutting edge research for the scrutiny of their peers, while in the evenings they continue discussions with friends and colleagues over dinner on the university campus, with the inspiring backdrop of the Santa Ynez mountains meeting the Pacific ocean behind them. https://iohk.io/press/ Ouroboros, developed by a team led by IOHK chief scientist Aggelos Kiayias, made it through a tough admission process for the prestigious conference. This year, 311 papers were submitted and of those 72 were accepted. Only three papers at the conference were on the subject of blockchain. All three papers were supported by IOHK funding. Speaking after his presentation, Professor Kiayias said: “We’re very happy that we had the opportunity to present Ouroboros at the conference. The protocol and especially its security analysis were very well received by fellow cryptographers.” “Our next steps will be to focus on the next version of the protocol, Ouroboros Praos which improves even further the security and performance characteristics of the protocol.” The Ouroboros protocol stands out as the first proof of stake algorithm that is provably secure, meaning that it offers security guarantees that are mathematically proven. This is essential for a protocol that is intended to be used in cryptocurrency, an infrastructure that must be relied on to carry billions of dollars worth of value. In addition to security, if blockchains are going to become infrastructure for new financial systems they must be able to comfortably handle millions of users. The key to scaling up is proof of stake, a far more energy efficient and cost effective algorithm, and as such this research represents a significant step forward in cryptography. Ouroboros also has the distinction of being implemented – the protocol will be an integral part of Cardano, a blockchain system currently in development. https://iohk.io/research/papers/#XJ6MHFXX https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ There were two other papers presented at the bitcoin session on Monday. The Bitcoin Backbone Protocol with Chains of Variable Difficulty, was produced by a team of three researchers and included Prof Kiayias. It is a continuation of previous research into Bitcoin, which was itself the first work to prove security properties of its blockchain. A third paper on the subject of bitcoin was presented, Bitcoin as a Transaction Ledger: A Composable Treatment. Other notable talks at the conference included a presentation by John Martinis, an expert on quantum computing and former physics professor at the University of California Santa Barbara, who is now working at Google to build a quantum computer. Leading cryptographers at the conference included Whitfield Diffie, pioneer of the public key cryptography that made Bitcoin possible, and Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman, who came up with the RSA public-key cryptosystem that is widely used for secure data transmission. https://www.forbes.com/sites/amycastor/2017/08/23/at-crypto-2017-blockchain-presentations-focus-on-proofs-not-concepts/#6e558d1a7b70 https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ https://iohk.io/team/bernardo-david/ https://iohk.io/team/peter-gazi/ -- Input Output See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ Read our papers: http://iohk.link/paper-ouroboros Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/ See more on Cardano: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ --
Views: 1366 IOHK
DEF CON 23 - Crypto and Privacy Village - Craig Young - Smart Home Invasion
 
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SMART HOME INVASION Craig Young @craigtweets BIO: Craig is a computer security researcher with Tripwire's Vulnerability and Exposures Research Team (VERT). He has identified and disclosed dozens of vulnerabilities in products from Google, Amazon, IBM, NETGEAR, Adobe, HP, and others. His research has resulted in numerous CVEs and recognition in the Google Application Security Hall of Fame. Craig won in track 0 and track 1 of the first ever SOHOpelessly Broken contest at DEF CON 22 by demonstrating 10 0-day flaws in SOHO wireless routers. ABSTRACT: Smart home technology has been a dream for many perhaps inspired by the likes of George Jetson. Unfortunately the technology is in its infancy still and the question remains as to whether vendors can demonstrate the ability to make our homes smarter without simultaneously introducing new risks to personal safety and privacy. In an effort to answer this question, Tripwire VERT conducted a security assessment of the three top-selling ‘Smart Home Hub' products available on Amazon. The research revealed 0-day flaws in each product allowing an attacker to control smart home functionality. This presentation will reveal some of the findings from this study including vulnerability discoveries. If not addressed, smart home flaws can give rise to a new type of ‘smart criminal' able to case victims without being seen. Once a target is chosen, it is possible to unlock doors and disable security monitoring. REASON: Each product I tested had 0-day flaws Two of the three products evaluated contained 0-day flaws allowing a remote attacker to gain root access with limited to no user-interaction required. I will be demonstrating a PoC which determines the local IP address and searches for the vulnerable device. The PoC described in #3 is still 0-day in official firmware, the latest RC firmware, and possibly in the latest beta firmware.
Views: 1800 DEFCONConference
The Science of Internet Freedom - Cecylia Bocovich - University of Waterloo
 
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Cecylia Bocovich is a PhD student at the University of Waterloo and a member of the Cryptography, Security, and Privacy Research Lab (CrySP). Her research focuses on many different aspects of censorship circumvention, with an emphasis on the implementation and real-world deployment of reliable and secure systems. She received a Masters of Mathematics in Computer Science from the University of Waterloo in 2014, during which she developed software engineering techniques to simplify the composition of large, feature-oriented systems.
Views: 1951 NSERCTube
2 Challenges in Cryptography Research (ft. Serge Vaudenay)
 
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This video presents the Diffie-Hellman protocol, which is used to set up secure communication channels all over the Internet. It features Serge Vaudenay, full professor of the IC School at EPFL. https://people.epfl.ch/serge.vaudenay ————————————————————————————— The Diffie-Hellman Protocol (ft. Serge Vaudenay) | ZettaBytes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOlCU4not0s
Views: 1544 ZettaBytes, EPFL
The Future of Computer Security with EFF's Brad Templeton | Singularity University
 
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Brad Templeton, chairman of the board of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), describes the future of online security, privacy and society. This lecture is from Singularity University's Graduate Summer Program 2009. www.singularityu.org Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1Wq6gwm Connect with Singularity University: Website: http://singularityu.org Singularity HUB:http://singularityhub.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/singularityu Twitter: https://twitter.com/singularityu Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/singularity-university Google+: https://plus.google.com/+singularityu About Singularity University: Singularity University is a benefit corporation headquartered at NASA's research campus in Silicon Valley. We provide educational programs, innovative partnerships and a startup accelerator to help individuals, businesses, institutions, investors, NGOs and governments understand cutting-edge technologies, and how to utilize these technologies to positively impact billions of people. Brad Templeton - The Future of Computer Security | Singularity University http://www.youtube.com/user/SingularityU
Views: 26417 Singularity University
IOHK | Research; Prof Aggelos Kiayias, Input Output Research.
 
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IOHK's Chief Scientist, Professor Aggelos Kiayias presents a full update on in-house research, embedded research and our extended collaborations. Filmed on location in Lisbon, Portugal at the IOHK Global Summit 2018. Prof Aggelos Kiayias is the Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. He joins IOHK as chief scientist through a long-term consulting agreement between IOHK and the University of Edinburgh, UK, where he is based and continues to do research and teach courses in cyber security and cryptography. Prof Kiayias is also Professor in Residence (gratis) at the University of Connecticut, USA, and Associate Professor of Cryptography and Security (on leave) at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. Prof Kiayias’s cyber security research over the years has been funded by the Horizon 2020 programme (EU), the European Research Council (EU), the General Secretariat for Research and Technology (Greece), the National Science Foundation (USA), the Department of Homeland Security (USA), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA). He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Athens. He has more than 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ -- Input Output See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/cardano/ Read our papers: http://iohk.link/paper-ouroboros Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/
Views: 2334 IOHK
Cafe Scientifique: Research in Cryptocurrencies - Solving Privacy and Scalability Issues
 
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In this presentation, Benedikt Bünz will give a brief technical introduction to cryptocurrencies and will touch on a few research problems related to improving the scalability and privacy of cryptocurrencies. Bünz is a researcher interested in applied cryptography, especially as it relates to cryptocurrencies. Cryptography is the science of secure communication which not only underlies the security of cryptocurrencies, but the internet as a whole. He is a second-year PhD candidate in computer science at Stanford University, where he is advised by Dan Boneh. His work focuses on enhancing the privacy, usability and security of protocols that are related to blockchains. His research includes work on automatic and privacy-preserving auditing of exchanges, making cryptocurrency transactions confidential but still verifiable, as well as developing publicly verifiable lotteries and improving the security and efficiency of mobile cryptocurrency clients. Learn more about Café Scientifique on our website https://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/learn/cafe-scientifique/
Stanford Seminar - Conducting Usable Privacy and Security Studies: It's Complicated
 
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"Conducting Usable Privacy and Security Studies: It's Complicated" -Lorrie Cranor, Carnegie Mellon University This seminar series features dynamic professionals sharing their industry experience and cutting edge research within the human-computer interaction (HCI) field. Each week, a unique collection of technologists, artists, designers, and activists will discuss a wide range of current and evolving topics pertaining to HCI. Learn more: http://stanford.io/UdmdrX
Views: 439 stanfordonline
Digital Security Focus Area in Horizon 2020: reducing threats, enabling opportunities!
 
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The call for proposals under the Work Programme 2016-2017 of Societal Challenge 7 "Digital security Focus Area" of Horizon 2020 is open. If you consider submitting a proposal and want to know more about this competitive call, please watch this video to get some useful pointers. There are €100 million available through this call. Areas addressed in this Work Programme are: • Assurance and Certification for Trustworthy and Secure ICT systems, services and components • Cyber Security for SMEs, local public administration and Individuals • Increasing digital security of health related data on a systemic level • Economics of Cybersecurity • EU Cooperation and International Dialogues in Cybersecurity and Privacy Research and Innovation • Cryptography • Addressing Advanced Cyber Security Threats and Threat Actors • Privacy, Data Protection, Digital Identities And the link to the calls on the participant portal is: https://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal4/desktop/en/opportunities/h2020/calls/h2020-ds-2016-2017.html#c,topics=callIdentifier/t/H2020-DS-2016-2017/1/1/1&callStatus/t/Forthcoming/1/1/0&callStatus/t/Open/1/1/0&callStatus/t/Closed/1/1/0&+identifier/desc
Prof. Kiayias - Ouroboros - A Provably Secure Proof of Stake Blockchain Protocol, CARDANO
 
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https://iohk.io/research/papers/a-pro... Mathematicians with a curiosity about the algorithms behind blockchain came to hear Aggelos Kiayias speak at Oxford university’s Mathematical Institute on Wednesday. Professor Kiayias, Chief Scientist at IOHK, had been invited to the university to give a talk on his work on Ouroboros, a provably secure Proof-of-Stake algorithm for blockchain. It the first time such a cryptographic protocol has been devised and is significant because its use would enable blockchains to process many more transactions, giving the technology the muscle that would scale it up for far wider use than at present. “Bitcoin is slow,” he said in the presentation, in an outline of the problem. “The transactions per second of Visa are in the order of many thousands, for Paypal in the order of hundreds, and Bitcoin is far less than that – clearly that’s something that can’t scale to a global level.” In addition to the much greater efficiency of Ouroboros, Prof Kiayias explained a novel reward mechanism for incentivising the protocol and used game theory to show why attacks such as selfish mining and block withholding would be neutralised. A Nash equilibrium is a prescription of a strategy for each rational player, with the property that if other players follow it, it does not make sense for a rational player to deviate from it. Prof Kiayias described how Ouroboros can be proven to be an approximate Nash equilibrium, thus distinguishing this blockchain system from Bitcoin, which is known to be not incentive compatible. The Ouroboros paper was first published last December with Alexander Russel, Bernardo David and Roman Oliynykov and Prof Kiayias presented the work at the Alan Turing Institute in London last year. Bernardo David on PoS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5sCs... Bernardo David presenting PoS in detail at IOHK's Tokyo tech lab: https://youtu.be/hMgxZOsTlQc Among the audience was Hayyu Imanda, whose desire to specialise in cryptography for her PhD studies brought her to hear the presentation. The 22-year-old is currently in a class of 26 students at Oxford university studying for an MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science. “I come from a pure maths background and I find cryptography very interesting, in that it was relatively recently founded and there is so much research happening,” she says. “I see it as a bridge from pure maths into real life, with many uses in terms of security, and it’s going to be a growing field.” More images from the event here: https://iohk.io/blog/a-proof-of-stake... -- https://iohk.io/team/aggelos-kiayias/ Prof Aggelos Kiayias is the Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. He joins IOHK as chief scientist through a long-term consulting agreement between IOHK and the University of Edinburgh, UK, where he is based and continues to do research and teach courses in cyber security and cryptography. Prof Kiayias is also Professor in Residence (gratis) at the University of Connecticut, USA, and Associate Professor of Cryptography and Security (on leave) at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. Prof Kiayias’s cyber security research over the years has been funded by the Horizon 2020 programme (EU), the European Research Council (EU), the General Secretariat for Research and Technology (Greece), the National Science Foundation (USA), the Department of Homeland Security (USA), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA). He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Athens. He has more than 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. He currently serves as the program chair of the Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2017 conference. -- Input Output See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/
Views: 515 Quantum Fields
Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment - Bart Preneel
 
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Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment, by Bart Preneel Authentication methods are based on something known, owned, biometric, location or evidence of trusted third party authentication. + A password is a case of something known. Passwords are a vulnerable, but cheap and convenient way of authenticating an entity. Several techniques to augment their effectiveness are in use including challenge-response and one-time passwords. + Secure devices such as smart cards and USB tokens often combine the 'owned' with the 'known', since secret keys are locked in the token with a password or PIN code. However, within the broad category of secure tokens, trustworthiness is variable, depending on whether keys can be extracted, passwords can be eavesdropped or the device can be tampered with. + Biometry identifies a person via physical characteristics. + Location is often used as the sole authentication factor, but is insecure given the relative ease of spoofing IP or MAC addresses. + Multi-factor authentication is stronger than single-factor. + The Kerberos protocol uses a key distribution-based authentication server. Service consumers must authenticate with a central server to obtain a secret session key with service providers. Such schemes require a single sign-on to access servers across a trust domain. While public key cryptography is well suited to entity authentication, performance constraints often mandate a symmetric algorithm for encrypting data passed between systems. Key establishment should be linked to authentication, so that a party has assurances that a key is only shared with the authenticated party. The Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol underlies a host of current technologies such as STS (Station-to-Station protocol) and IKE. Learning objectives Gain insight into + entity authentication protocols, + the benefits and limitations of authentication factors, + key establishment protocols, + why and how to use authentication servers. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel in Leuven on Tuesday February 11th at SecAppDev 2014. Professor Bart Preneel heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group at KU Leuven. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1454 secappdev.org
[DS15] The German Data Privacy Laws and IT Security   - Stefan Schumacher
 
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Hesse introduced the first data privacy law in the world in 1970. Since then, the German data privacy laws evolved over time and led to the creations of several tools and methods to protect private data. Though it is aimed at data protection it can be utilized for IT security. This talk introduces the data privacy law and it's main ideas. I will also show how it can be used to further IT security especially in the SME sector. This mostly refers to the identification and description of processes that work with data and therefore have to be protected. Stefan Schumacher is the president of the Magdeburg Institute for Security Research and editor of the Magdeburg Journal for Security Research in Magdeburg/Germany. He started his hacking career before the fall of the Berlin Wall, on a small East German computer with 1.75 MHz and a Datasette drive. Ever since he liked to explore technical and social systems, with a focus on security and how to exploit them. He was a NetBSD developer for some years and involved in several other Open Source projects and events. He studied Educational Science and Psychology, has done a lot of unique research about the Psychology of Security with a focus on Social Engineering, User Training and Didactics of Security/Cryptography. Currently he's leading the research project Psychology of Security,focusing on fundamental qualitative and quantitative research about the perception and construction of security. He presents the research results regularly at international conferences like AusCert Australia, Chaos Communication Congress, Chaos Communciation Camp, DeepSec Vienna, DeepIntel Salzburg, Positive Hack Days Moscow or LinuxDays Luxembourg and in security related journals and books.
Federated Identity: Security, Privacy, and Convenience
 
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Federated identity management and single sign-on enhances collaboration, benefiting research and education.
Views: 977 Internet2videos
Sensemaker: Shaping the future of cybersecurity and privacy - 25 Oct 2018
 
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For the 2018 Sensemaker series, Innotribe has partnered with IBM Research. The latest IBM Security study reinforces what the industry has known for years - financial services is the most targeted industry for cyberattack. Phishing attacks, malware, malicious code, insider attacks, and attacks by nation states all pose persistent and deepening threats. As an IBM Research scientist, Cecilia Boschini is developing new security protocols based on lattice cryptography, which no computer can crack, not even future quantum computers. In this session she will talk about IBM's latest research in security, touching on zero-knowledge proofs, AI for security, data privacy, and, of course, post-quantum cryptography.
Views: 327 SibosTV
Cryptography: From Mathematical Magic to Secure Communication
 
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Dan Boneh, Stanford University Theoretically Speaking Series http://simons.berkeley.edu/events/theoretically-speaking-dan-boneh Theoretically Speaking is produced by the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing, with sponsorship from the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) and Berkeley City College. These presentations are supported in part by an award from the Simons Foundation.
Views: 14341 Simons Institute
Order-Preserving Encryption Revisited: Improved Security Analysis and Alternative Solutions
 
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Talk at crypto 2011. Authors: Alexandra Boldyreva, Adam O'Neill, Nathan Chenette. See http://www.iacr.org/cryptodb/data/paper.php?pubkey=23597
Views: 1451 TheIACR
USENIX Enigma 2018 - Emerging Cryptography
 
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Steve Weis, Software Engineer, Facebook This talk discusses emerging cryptographic technologies including secure enclaves, homomorphic encryption, secure multiparty computation, and functional cryptography. We'll focus on the potential impact to everyday security and privacy. For background, we'll recap trends in cryptographic adoption and how it has affected real world users. We'll cover both positive and negative examples and suggest areas of development most beneficial to the next billion users coming online. We'll then discuss how emerging cryptography may enable new models of computation, while better protecting people's sensitive data. Sign up to find out more about Enigma at https://enigma.usenix.org
CERIAS - 2015-04-15: Engineering Secure Computation -- Efficiently
 
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Secure Multiparty Computation offers cryptographically strong guarantees on the secrecy of data used in collaborative computing among untrusted parties. It has many important applications ranging from peer-to-peer secure auction to privacy-preserving data mining. In this talk, I will present my experience in building efficient secure computation protocols. I will also share my vision on how to blend modern cryptography and programming languages research to solve interesting cyber-security problems. About the Speaker Dr. Yan Huang is an assistant professor at Indiana University. Dr. Huang is interested in developing secure protocols, with applications in private collaborative data mining, secure cloud computing, and cyber-physical systems. His research combines techniques from systems, cryptography, and programming languages to build secure systems. He is the creator of FastGC and ObliVM, the leading software tools to build efficient secure computation applications. The tools are freely available and have been used in several research projects by both academia and industry labs world-wide. http://www.cerias.purdue.edu
Views: 108 ceriaspurdue
2015 SPRITZ Workshop on Future Systems Security and Privacy (Padua, 23-10-2015)
 
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2015 Workshop on Security and Privacy Research Group at the University of Padua, in collaboration with Clusit (The Italian Association for Computer Security) organizes the "2015 SPRITZ Workshop on Future Systems Security and Privacy". This event is organized within the framework of the European Cyber Security Month (ECSM). ------------------------------------------ Speakers ----------------------------------------------- - Mauro Conti (Principal investigator of SPRITZ research group, University of Padua) - Introduction to the 2015 SPRITZ workshop - Veelasha Moonsamy (Radboud University, NL) - Mining contrasting permission patterns for clean and malicious applications - Ding Ding (University of Padua) - Impact of Country-scale Internet Disconnection on Structured and Social P2P Overlays - Daniele Lain (University of Padua) - Boten ELISA: A Novel Apprach for Botnet C&C in Online Social Networks - Giuseppe Cascavilla (Sapienza University of Rome) - Revealing Censored informations Through Comments and Commenters in Online Social Networks - Riccardo Lazzaretti (University of Siena) - Computing with private data: when cryptography meets signal processing - Bernardo Magri (Sapienza University of Rome) - Security of Signature Schemes against Subversion Attacks
Christian Badertscher | Ouroboros Genesis, CCS in Toronto 2018.
 
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A third major paper from the Ouroboros line of research was presented at a leading computer security and cryptography event, a recognition of the contribution the work makes to the field of computer science. https://iohk.io/blog/ouroboros-genesis-presented-at-flagship-conference/ The paper, Ouroboros Genesis, was presented by researcher Christian Badertscher at the 25th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security, held in Toronto this week. The conference is five days of presentations, workshops and tutorials for hundreds of delegates, who are information security researchers, industry professionals, and developers from around the world. The annual event, organised by the Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control (SIGSAC) of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), is a forum for delegates to come together for discussions and to explore cutting edge research. This year CCS sponsors included the US government agency, the National Science Foundation, and major global technology companies such as Baidu, Cisco, Samsung, Google, Facebook. The hardware wallet maker, Ledger, was also present. CCS is the highest rated computer security and cryptography conference according to Google Scholar ratings, meaning that collectively, the papers selected to appear at the conference are more cited by academics than papers for any other conference. IOHK’s paper appeared in one of the two sessions that were dedicated to blockchain, with a total of six papers on the subject overall. These included a paper on what will happen with blockchains such as Bitcoin as rewards get smaller and the potential problems that stem from that. Scalability was in focus too, with a paper on scaling blockchains through sharding and another on state channel networks. Since Bitcoin demonstrated the disadvantages of using an energy-intensive proof-of-work protocol to run a public distributed ledger, many researchers have turned to explore proof of stake. The Ouroboros research is an attempt to systematically surmount the challenges that proof of stake poses and describe a secure, efficient and sustainable protocol for blockchains. This effort has been led by Professor Aggelos Kiayias, IOHK Chief Scientist and Chair in Cybersecurity and Privacy at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Informatics. In the space of only a couple of years, the team have made significant advances. Ouroboros was the first peer reviewed, provably secure proof-of-stake protocol, and it is already running in the real world, underpinning Cardano, a top 10 global cryptocurrency. Ouroboros Genesis is the third paper in the Ouroboros family of proof-of-stake protocols, and the third paper from this important line of IOHK research to be heard at a flagship international computer science conference. The first paper, Ouroboros, was presented at Crypto 2017 in California, and the second, Ouroboros Praos, was at Eurocrypt 2018 in Tel Aviv. Further papers are to come from the research team, including on sharding, a means to provide scalability for Cardano. Using Ouroboros Genesis, new users joining the blockchain will be able to do so securely based only on an authentic copy of the genesis block, without the need to rely on a checkpoint provided by a trusted party. Though common in proof-of-work protocols like Bitcoin, this feature was previously unavailable in existing proof-of-stake systems. This means that Ouroboros can now match the security guarantees of proof-of-work protocols like Bitcoin in a way that was previously widely believed to be impossible. -- See more at: https://iohk.io Get our latest news updates: https://iohk.io/blog/ Meet the team: https://iohk.io/team/ Learn about our projects: https://iohk.io/projects/ Visit our library: https://iohk.io/research/library/ In the press: https://iohk.io/press/ Work with us: https://iohk.io/careers/
Views: 2523 IOHK
Blockchain: Application Scenarios and Security | 27 April 2017 - 2:15 pm
 
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This presentation gives an overview about Blockchain application scenarios, which can be divided into Digital Registry, Crypto-currency, Smart contracts. Building blocks of Blockchain based systems are investigated with respect to their security and trust properties. Find all presentations for download under https://www.siemens.com/hm17-program
Views: 4419 Siemens
Blockchain: Distributed Trust - Bart Preneel
 
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The Bitcoin ecosystem had a bumpy start, but driven in part by the demand created by the Silk Road and perhaps the Cyprus crisis, the impact grew quickly: the total value of bitcoins rose to several billion US$ in the first two years (currently it is around US$ 14 billion), hundreds of alternative cryptocurrencies (altcoins) were created and large mining entities were established, mostly in China. The ideas behind Bitcoin have opened up new approaches to cryptocurrencies, but also to distributed consensus, distributed naming, secure timestamping and commitment. One of the aspects that have drawn the most interest is the smart contract (that is, cryptographically enforceable agreements) on top of the Bitcoin ecosystem (or on other systems such as Ethereum). Even if some observers predict that the Bitcoin ecosystem will disappear or become irrelevant, the core ideas have already made a major impact. Unlike any other payment system or cryptocurrency created before, Bitcoin allows for fully decentralized generation of currency and fully decentralized verification of transactions. The core idea is the blockchain, a public ledger that registers all transactions under the form of a hash chain; the blockchain describes the state of the system, that is, it specifies who owns which amount. Transactions themselves are validated based on a scripting language, which creates some flexibility. In a distributed system, a central problem is how to achieve consensus (e.g., how to deal with double-spending transactions). Transactions are broadcast over a low-latency peer-to-peer network that offers some robustness against censoring or sabotage. This approach allows the Bitcoin ecosystem to achieve distributed consensus in a practical way assuming that players are rational (something which is known to be unachievable without additional assumptions such as rationality) albeit at the cost of a major computational effort in terms of mining. While the financial industry is less interested in the anarchistic aspects of the Bitcoin ecosystem (the governance model and the uncontrolled money supply), the distributed consensus idea is very appealing and is believed to have a very high business potential for a large number of financial transactions and interactions. In 2015, about US$ 1 billion was invested in venture capital in the area of blockchain and cryptocurrencies and the Aite Group predicted in 2016 that blockchain market could be worth as much as US$ 400 million in annual business by 2019. The idea of a public ledger for timestamping and registering documents using hash chains is more than 25 years old, as witnessed by the efforts of Surety Technologies in the early 1990 and the ISO standardization in this area in the mid 1990s –- but these earlier approaches did use a central authority to register all transactions. Bitcoin has inspired many actors to revisit those ideas by `taming’ the Bitcoin ecosystem into a private or permissioned ledger, where only a few selected actors have control over new currencies or verification of transactions (to get rid of distributed control) and where access to the ledger can be restricted (to get rid of full transparency). Some of the notable developments in this context are the open source initiative of IBM that is called Hyperledger and Intel's experimental Sawtooth Lake architecture. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the imec-COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research areas are information security and privacy with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols and efficient and secure implementations. He undertakes industrial consulting for major players in the finance, telco and hardware industry and has co-designed the Belgian eID and e-voting scheme. He is active in international standardization . Professor Preneel has served as Director, (1997-present), Vice President (2002-2007) and President (2008-2013) of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and is co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium). He is a fellow of the IACR, a member of the Permanent Stakeholders group of ENISA (European Network and Information Security Agency) and of the Academia Europaea. He has testified for the European and Belgian parliament. He has been invited speaker at more than 150 conferences and schools in 40 countries. In 2014 he received the RSA Award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics.
Views: 2183 secappdev.org
Privacy technologies masterclass: Professor George Danezis, UCL
 
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Bio George Danezis is a Reader in Security and Privacy Engineering at the Department of Computer Science of University College London, and Head of the Information Security Research Group. He has been working on anonymous communications, privacy enhancing technologies (PET), and traffic analysis since 2000. He has previously been a researcher for Microsoft Research, Cambridge; a visiting fellow at K.U.Leuven (Belgium); and a research associate at the University of Cambridge (UK), where he also completed his doctoral dissertation under the supervision of Prof. R.J. Anderson. Research His theoretical contributions to the Privacy Technologies field include the established information theoretic and other probabilistic metrics for anonymity and pioneering the study of statistical attacks against anonymity systems. On the practical side he is one of the lead designers of the anonymous mail system Mixminion, as well as Minx, Sphinx, Drac and Hornet; he has worked on the traffic analysis of deployed protocols such as Tor. His current research interests focus around secure communications, high-integirty systems to support privacy, smart grid privacy, peer-to-peer and social network security, as well as the application of machine learning techniques to security problems. He has published over 70 peer-reviewed scientific papers on these topics in international conferences and journals. He was the co-program chair of ACM Computer and Communications Security Conference in 2011 and 2012, IFCA Financial Cryptography and Data Security in 2011, the Privacy Enhancing Technologies Workshop in 2005 and 2006. He sits on the PET Symposium board and ACM CCS Steering committee and he regularly serves in program committees of leading conferences in the field of privacy and security. He is a fellow of the British Computing Society since 2014. Web page: http://www0.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/G.Danezis/ Full CV: http://www0.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/G.Danezis/danezis-cv.pdf #datascienceclasses

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