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Shaft vs incline || difference between shaft and incline || mining || mining videos || shaft
 
02:35
This video will explain the difference between vertical shaft and incline. These are the two approaches to the coal seam in underground mining,mining shaft, mining incline,coal, capital cost, ventilation etc
Views: 7665 Mining Technical
What is DRIVAGE U/G mine ? (हिंदी में ) ,shaft ,incline Adit & tunnel
 
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Hiii Mai is विडियो में आपको underground mine के coal seam को कैसे approch करता है अच्छे से बताया है उम्मीद है आपको पसंद आये । Thank-you
Views: 794 Technical Mining
Adit 11
 
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Underground Mining by machine - WBB Adit 11 Mid 1990s
Views: 394 Anthony Vincent
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 3
 
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I’m not exaggerating when I say that this section of the abandoned limestone mine has the biggest adits (mine tunnels) that I have ever seen – and we have seen a lot of underground mines… It seems apparent that the miners were intent on extracting as much limestone as possible, while maintaining the minimum of what was necessary for the structural integrity of the mine. As such, we encountered adit after adit, all in rows with interconnecting tunnels. These rows of adits extend to the levels above and below too, leaving just a skeleton of stone behind to prop everything up. It really is an extraordinary site. Bear in mind, we only scratched the surface of all that makes up this mine. There are many levels we did not access and many drifts we did not go into. Given the sheer scale of the workings in this section of the mine, we assumed that these workings must be newer than the first underground workings we explored. Some have expressed surprise that the miners did not simply pursue an open pit operation at this limestone deposit. In fact, the remainder of this deposit is being quarried nearby. However, the miners were not stupid and the concrete plant is still in business. So, give them the benefit of the doubt in regard to pursuing the limestone deposit underground in this section. Given how low labor costs used to be and given that earthmoving equipment can handle a lot more now than it could more than a century ago when they started this mine, it was probably more economical for the miners to punch in from the side and to haul the limestone straight out rather than to dig down from the top in order to haul it up and out to be turned into concrete. Again, a big thank you to Alessio for sharing this mine with us... His channel can be found below and he does urban exploration in general, not just abandoned mines! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 3645 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Vulture Mine: Part 2 of 3 - The Lower Adit
 
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Well, you’ve seen the outside of this fantastic abandoned mine, now it is time to head underground to explore the adit you saw in the first video... We encounter some severely mangled equipment just inside the portal, which I suspect may be a result of the miners overdoing it a bit with explosives inside of the mine. And, of course, we find more washing machines! Farther back inside of the mine is a very cool hand-operated hoist, which the miners used to hoist ore buckets out of a winze beneath the hoist. It is certainly not something that one sees every day inside of a mine and, I believe, is further evidence that this mine was operated on a tight budget. It seems that this mine was not hugely profitable as it is not a large mine (and it is abandoned). However, there ARE two adits of a respectable size and countless prospect pits along with spots where the miners obviously dug into various rocks and cliff faces (presumably for sampling or even taking out small veins of ore visible on the surface). So, they must have been finding something to justify the work they were doing as well as the hard work that would have been required to construct this mine in the first place as it is not in an easy location. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 12763 TVR Exploring
Fully Mechanized Longwall Coal Production
 
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Fully mechanized Longwall Coal Production
Views: 229023 mining videos
What is SHAFT MINING? What does SHAFT MINING mean? SHAFT MINING meaning & explanation
 
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What is SHAFT MINING? What does SHAFT MINING mean? SHAFT MINING meaning - SHAFT MINING definition - SHAFT MINING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Shaft mining or shaft sinking is excavating a vertical or near-vertical tunnel from the top down, where there is initially no access to the bottom. Shallow shafts, typically sunk for civil engineering projects differ greatly in execution method from deep shafts, typically sunk for mining projects. When the top of the excavation is the ground surface, it is referred to as a shaft; when the top of the excavation is underground, it is called a winze or a sub-shaft. Small shafts may be excavated upwards from within an existing mine as long as there is access at the bottom, in which case they are called Raises. A shaft may be either vertical or inclined (between 45 and 90 degrees to the horizontal), although most modern mine shafts are vertical. If access exists at the bottom of the proposed shaft and ground conditions allow then raise boring may be used to excavate the shaft from the bottom up, such shafts are called borehole shafts. Shaft Sinking is one of the most difficult of all development methods: restricted space, gravity, groundwater and specialized procedures make the task quite formidable. Historically mine shaft sinking has been among the most dangerous of all mining occupations and the preserve of mining contractors. Today shaft sinking contractors are concentrated in Canada and South Africa. The most visible feature of a mine shaft is the headframe (or winding tower, poppet head or pit head) which stands above the shaft. Depending on the type of hoist used the top of the headframe will either house a hoist motor or a sheave wheel (with the hoist motor mounted on the ground). The headframe will also contain bins for storing ore being transferred to the processing facility. At ground level beneath and around the headframe is the Shaft Collar (also called the Bank or Deck), which provides the foundation necessary to support the weight of the headframe and provides a means for men, materials and services to enter and exit the shaft. Collars are usually massive reinforced concrete structures with more than one level. If the shaft is used for mine ventilation, a plenum space or casing is incorporated into the collar to ensure the proper flow of air into and out of the mine. Beneath the Collar the part of the shaft which continues into the ground is called the Shaft Barrel. At locations where the Shaft Barrel meets horizontal workings there is a Shaft Station which allows men, materials and services to enter and exit the shaft. From the station tunnels (drifts, galleries or levels) extend towards the ore body, sometimes for many kilometers. The lowest Shaft Station is most often the point where rock leaves the mine levels and is transferred to the shaft, if so a Loading Pocket is excavated on one side of the shaft at this location to allow transfer facilities to be built. Beneath the lowest Shaft Station the shaft continues on for some distance, this area is referred to as the Shaft Bottom. A tunnel called a Ramp typically connects the bottom of the shaft with the rest of the mine, this Ramp often contains the mine's water handling facility, called the Sump, as water will naturally flow to the lowest point in the mine. Shafts may be sunk by conventional drill and blast or mechanised means. The industry is gradually attempting to shift further towards shaft boring but a reliable method to do so has yet to be developed. The shaft lining performs several functions; it is first and foremost a safety feature preventing loose or unstable rock from falling into the shaft, then a place for shaft sets to bolt into and lastly a smooth surface to minimise resistance to airflow for ventilation. In North and South America, smaller shafts are designed to be rectangular with timber supports. Larger shafts are round and are concrete lined. Final choice of shaft lining is dependent on the geology of the rock which the shaft passes through, some shafts have several liners sections as required Where shafts are sunk in very competent rock there may be no requirement for lining at all, or just the installation of welded mesh and rock bolts. The material of choice for shaft lining is mass concrete which is poured behind Shaft Forms in Lifts of 6m as the shaft advances (gets deeper).
Views: 4217 The Audiopedia
Exploring The Vulture Mine: Part 3 of 3 - The Upper Adit
 
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This is the final video in the series on this mine and, as the title suggests, we head up the mountain to the upper adit and then get underground to explore the surprises that await us within... I would have expected the lower adit to be the largest adit since it is right next to the compressor shack and had such a large waste rock pile. However, it was not to be. The upper adit turned out to be the larger adit. Some things remain the same though – plenty of washing machines up there too… I believe all of the evidence suggests that this abandoned mine operated on a shoestring budget. However, what the miners lacked in dollars, they certainly seem to have made up for with ingenuity. The washing machines, for example – we see them being used for everything from ore buckets to ventilators for the mine. I still wonder a few things – especially where the miners slept since there is no way they commuted in there and yet there was no sign of a bunkhouse or any other shelter for sleeping. It was an adventure in its own right just getting to this mine, but it was well worth it. I loved the rail going up the side of the mountain, I loved the compressor shack and all of the equipment and materials around, I loved the adits and the features inside (such as the hoist/windlass)… Great stuff all around at this mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 12893 TVR Exploring
Stope Explorers
 
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We Take a look down a mid Cornwall mine, a short laddered shaft leads to a incline shaft onto the top of the stope, from there we descend through the stope to a shaft choked with rubbish. Below the rubbish is a tunnel that leads to the blue pool, unfortunatly the water level was too high to go any further, we will return again in the Spring. - Please drop by my new facebook page and give me a like: https://www.facebook.com/CornishMineExplorer/ - Important Note: We don't post the real names of the mines featured in our videos, to protect the sites and to stop others with less experience putting themselves in danger. If you know this place, please don't mention it by name or location. Our team consists of ex miners, cavers and mine rescue, every trip is taken with caution and callouts made to other members of where we are underground. Please do not put yourself at risk or others by entering these abandonded mines.
Remote Plugged Mine Adit and Shaft
 
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This is the future of mine exploring, the gov is plugging everything no matter how remote.
Views: 2063 Mine Explorers
drilling process in blasting
 
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Thank you for watching and plz subscribe my channel
Views: 619 Mining India
Exploring the Rohnda Mine and Ball Mill
 
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10 years ago, https://starbuck.org/exploring/california/rhonda-mine/
Views: 18807 Mine Explorers
The Pioneer Mine & The Comet Tunnel - Part 2
 
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Construction of the Comet Tunnel was started in 1853 and it was developed to drain the Pioneer Mine. It took more than ten years of steady tunneling to reach the Pioneer Mine at a cost of about $60,000. The tunnel ended up approximately 100 feet beneath the Pioneer Mine and two shafts connected to the surface. The Comet Tunnel runs in excess of 2,000 feet to reach the Pioneer Mine and drains into the Deacon Long Ravine, which drains into Slate Creek. Part 1 is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0w0akKw8NU ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 1214 TVR Exploring
How is coal mined? - What is Surface Mining and Underground Mining - Video
 
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How is coal mined? Read Full Story: http://www.spoonfeeding.in/2013/02/how-is-coal-mined-what-is-surface.html Mining is the process of removing coal from the ground. There are two types of mining: underground mining and surface mining. When the coal seam is fewer than 125 feet under the surface, it is mined by surface mining. Coal that is deeper than 125 feet is removed from the ground by underground mining. Underground mining is used when the coal seam lies deep in the earth. In an underground mine only some of the coal is removed. The coal that remains helps support the mine roof. Underground mines look like a system of tunnels. The tunnels are used for traveling throughout the mine, moving coal from place to place and allowing air to circulate in the mine. The coal that is mined is put on conveyor belts. The conveyor belts take the coal to the surface. There are three types of underground mines: slope, drift, and shaft. When the coal seam is close to the surface but too deep to use surface mining, a slope mine can be built. In a slope mine a tunnel slants down from the surface to the coal seam. A drift mine is built when the coal seam lies in the side of a hill or mountain. Drift mines may also be built in a surface mine that has become too deep. There are many drift mines in the eastern United States. The most common type of mine in Illinois is the shaft mine. These mines may be 125 to 1,000 feet deep. A large hole, or shaft, is drilled down into the ground until it reaches the coal seam.
Views: 111358 Spoon Feeding
Loading Machine Operators - Underground Mining
 
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Loading Machine Operators - Underground Mining
Views: 185 irreligious6
#LeadersTalk with Zitron Tunnel Ventilation Systems
 
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During the World Tunnel Congress in Dubai, Asma Ouazzani Touhami, Area Manager of Zitron, one of the largest supplier of tunnel ventilation system in Spain talks to GineersNow TV about their latest technologies and product innovations in the mining and tunneling industry.
Views: 304 GineersNow
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 3
 
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After following the drift we ended the last video with to its surprising conclusion, we started moving back toward the main hub of this enormous abandoned mine. Along the way, we explored many of the side passages and raises that were bypassed on the route in through the main haulage adit located in this part of the mine. Following the very long hike up and out of the mine, we set up our camp for the night (we spent all day underground in this mine) and then headed above the mine to see some of its more interesting features above ground. You’ll see that we explore some of the mine buildings, including one that has an amazing collection inside of it. Although I was curious about what was inside of the modern mine buildings we discovered, I also had a specific destination in mind. One of my exploring buddies – Adit Addicts – had spotted what appeared to be a steam shovel abandoned above the modern mine we explored in this video. I wanted to see this machine to confirm what it was and also to film it if it really did turn out to be a steam shovel. As with the mine itself, it was quite a hike up into the hills above it. Fortunately, I was able to find the machine (although the GPS took me on a terrible route to do so) and it was indeed a steam shovel. Sort of... It was a steam shovel at one time, but had actually been converted over to run on an internal combustion motor. I had never seen anything like that before and it was pretty amazing to see one out in the desert mountains still next to the pile of dirt it had been excavating decades ago. The modern abandoned mine featured in this video is definitely not the first mine in this area and when looking around above the mine, it was fairly common to see old collapsed adits and old surface mining work. Many of these seemed to be more exploratory in nature though. This area has historically been a large producer of ores containing lead, copper and silver and a thriving town was once supported by the mines. However, today, there is almost no trace left of the ghost town or an aerial tramway that also used to be here. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 81629 TVR Exploring
Survey Works - Tunnelling
 
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I'm surveyor. Working in tunneling works for KVMRT Projects, Kuala Lumpur. Adits excavation in shaft 40 metres depth. Scanning progress by using Leica MS50.
Views: 5127 Faiz Nordin Gmail
Detailed Tour Of A Small Gold Mine
 
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Owner of a private cut and fill gold mine gives us a detailed tour, demonstrates tools, equipment, construction and the geology of his mine. Some of the clips are a little out of focus. Long video that explains many of the technicalities seen in old mines
Views: 288575 Mine Explorers
Nerragundah mine adit
 
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I think this may have been a breather shaft for the mount coman mine.
Views: 111 00Shivan00
How a Tunnel-Boring Machine Drills Underground
 
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Video courtesy of CDM/HMM Joint Venture - For engineering enthusiasts and anyone who's interested in the mechanics of siphon construction, this animation shows exactly how the 110-ton, 300-foot-long tunnel boring machine will drill a distance of nearly two miles, 100 feet beneath the New York Harbor seabed. Find out more about the Staten Island Water Siphon project: http://www.nycedc.com/project/replacement-anchorage-channel-water-siphons
Views: 381735 NYCEDC
Human Mole – The Man Who Spent 32 Years Digging a Tunnel to the Middle of Nowhere
 
03:02
Somewhere in the Mojave Desert’s El Paso range there is a strange tunnel that traverses 2,087 feet of solid rock up in Copper Mountain. What’s strange is that it doesn’t lead to anywhere special. It simply emerges on the high ledge, in the middle of nowhere. The only reason it exists is because an eccentric man named William Henry ‘Burro’ Schmidt – a.k.a. the human mole – wanted it there. Although he spent 32 years of his life single-handedly digging a half-mile long tunnel through a solid granite mountain, he never talked much about it. When questioned about his bizarre project, he simply replied that it was a shortcut. To where, no one really knows. Schmidt first migrated to the California desert from Rhode Island in the late 19th century, in order to improve his health. He is believed to have started digging the tunnel in 1902, near the site where he had staked a mining claim. He carried out the excavation using picks, hammers, hand drills and explosives, and removed rubble with a wheelbarrow. At times, he even carried it out on his back. Eventually, he installed iron tracks and a mine car to transport debris.
Views: 14994 HotOddity
HAULAGE SAFETY DEVICES
 
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haulage safety devices in mines
Views: 1023 Mining
Exploring The Vulture Mine: Part 1 of 3 - Remote Mining Camp
 
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This might not be an easy mine to get to, but the effort is well worth it. In the first video of this series, we explore the amazingly well-preserved desert mining camp and follow the rails around the mountain peak. The innovations on display at this abandoned mine are truly a testament to the ingenuity and resourcefulness of miners. I still do not know what that - presumably wind-driven - device made mostly out of old washing machines is… I sure hope that a viewer can weigh in on that one. I know that I said it several times in the video, but there was so much stuff at this mine that it was hard to take it all in – all of the engines, engine parts, tools, buckets, barrels, washing machines, random bits of rail and wood, cans, jugs, wires, cables... Well, you get the idea. There was a lot of equipment scattered around the mine site! Some of the old engines, tools, Union Carbide cans and other such rarities really belong in a museum, but it is pretty cool to be able to see them out in the field like this. I hardly feature it in the videos, but all around this mine were small prospect pits and places where the miners had obviously gone into various cliff faces for a few feet. So, I don’t know if they were picking out small pockets of material or if they were looking for something that wasn’t present other than where the main adits are. In the second video of the series, we explore the adit seen in the first video and in the final video, we explore an upper adit we discovered farther up the mountain at this abandoned mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19520 TVR Exploring
FOLLOW ME INTO THE QUEEN MINE. 1500 Feet Back. ask Jeff Williams
 
18:32
Follow me as we venture 1500 feet into the adit or haulage tunnel of the Queen mine in Bisbee, Arizona and then find out what it takes to be a Hard rock miner. Along the way you will learn all things needed to work down here and you might even find some Gold ...if your lucky. Click the link below to have your own Gold mining experience ; http://www.desertoutfitters.com/ http://www.askjeffwilliams.com/ Underground Blasting patterns. http://material.eng.usm.my/stafhome/termizi/EBS419E%20Blasting%20Tech/I_UNDERGROUND%20BLASTING.pdf
Views: 27353 Ask Jeff Williams
Exploring the Abandoned Silver Jack Mine (Part 2)
 
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WATCH PART 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMLPTHy-20s The final adit for the Silver Jack Mine, this one was the lowest of the 3 adits we explored. Please make sure to check out part 1!
Views: 944 Mines of the West
Columbia #2 Mine - Ore Cart Level - 2 of 2
 
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As seen on "No Limits" Season 1, Episode 7 on Animal Planet SDME descend the Columbia #2 Mine in Tecopa, CA. The Columbia #2 Mine is primarily vertical with 900'+ of known shafts connected with long drift tunnels and stopes. We find the 'working level' at 700' below ground with a working ore cart. The mine continues below via another incline shaft to the flooded 900' level. Watch the full ore cart ride: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auVnb9iDjAE San Diego Mine Enthusiasts - Documenting and preserving our nations mining history for the education of all. "Embraced, not erased!" Don't try this at home!! -HISTORY- The claim for the Columbia #2 (and other nearby mines) was staked in 1877 by William "Professor" & Robert Brown who soon became BCG&SMC (Balance Consolidated Gold & Silver Mining Co.). It was part of the Tecopa Mines group and produced an abundance of Silver and Lead, as well as some Gold, and other profitable minerals such as Dolomite used in brick and glass making.
Views: 5335 RetroElectroville
What is DRIFT MINING? What does DRIFT MINING mean? DRIFT MINING meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is DRIFT MINING? What does DRIFT MINING mean? DRIFT MINING meaning -DRIFT MINING definition - DRIFT MINING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Drift mining is either the mining of an ore deposit by underground methods, or the working of coal seams accessed by adits driven into the surface outcrop of the coal bed. A drift mine is an underground mine in which the entry or access is above water level and generally on the slope of a hill, driven horizontally into the ore seam. Random House dictionary says the origin of the term "drift mine" is an Americanism, circa 1885–1890. Drift is a more general mining term, meaning a near-horizontal passageway in a mine, following the bed (of coal, for instance) or vein of ore. A drift may or may not intersect the ground surface. A drift follows the vein, as distinguished from a crosscut that intersects it, or a level or gallery, which may do either. All horizontal or subhorizontal development openings made in a mine have the generic name of drift. These are simply tunnels made in the rock, with a size and shape depending on their use—for example, haulage, ventilation, or exploration.
Views: 517 The Audiopedia
Ep.38  Return to PIONEER COAL - Unburied Mine Tunnels
 
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EPISODE 37: An unexpected wintertime explore... returning to the Pioneer Open Pit Coal Mine in Stellarton, to see what has changed since Episode 19. More 100-200 year old tunnels have been exposed by mining operations ... (MORE INFO BELOW) We are a group of Abandoned Mine explorers in Nova Scotia. Abandoned Mine Hunting is somewhat of a cross between the hobby of urban exploration, caving (spelunking), and history enthusiast. If this is your kind of thing, be sure to subscribe so you will always be informed of each new episode. IF YOU KNOW OF AN ABANDONED MINE IN ATLANTIC CANADA, we'd love to hear from you. Send a private message. We may just come and do an explore and episode featuring your site ! ** BEST VIEWED using the YouTube app on a full size SmartTV ** SPECIAL NOTE: While this type of exploration is almost always kilometers back in deep forest, it cannot always be guaranteed that the land we are hiking is public (Crown). These forgotten old mines/claims are almost always over 100 years old. It is also common that most mine workings have some kind of natural cave-in covering their mouth, after nearly a century of erosion. So some explores may involve preparation of clearing that cave-in, and/or dealing with letting spring water (flooding) out of the adits. These facts, along with the inherent danger of abandoned mines, force us to remain anonymous. We are responsible for our own risks & actions (not yours), but be clear we are not promoting this activity. Only showing you what we do. As with any typical Urban Exploration type channel, our faces and commentary will always be masked. If you are seeing an Episode, it means we are already weeks or month(s) finished with that site and never going back. The delay is intentional, as nothing shown here will be in realtime. It cannot be stressed enough - abandoned mines or mine sites can pose a ton of lethal threats. *We are not kids looking for kicks* Keep in mind that our group is made up of responsible adults, each with specific skills, and cross-Canada experience with over 100+ mine walks. Most 10 times larger and deeper than will ever be found in Nova Scotia! Specific research is always done beforehand. Required equipment and backups are a must. While it is indeed possible to safely explore an abandoned mine, DO NOT ENTER A MINE without being experienced, or going with an experienced explorer. If you don't know what you're doing, STAY OUT STAY ALIVE is the best policy.
Exploring the Abandoned Centennial Mine (Part 2)
 
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PART 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFGAxzJyk5g&t=13s In this video, we continue our way through the 250-level of the Centennial Mine. After finishing up the 250-level, we find an open stope that accesses a lower level, the 290-level. The 290-level is directly beneath the 250-level and connects to it via many chutes and manways. In the 290 level we see ore cart 4-way intersections, more chutes, ladders, winzes, dynamite boxes and more! In Part 3 of this series, we will continue down the 290 level eventually intersecting the shaft we saw in Part 1. Stay tuned! #urbex #abandonedmine #mineexploring #abandoned #mining #exploring #washington #travel #history #adit #shaft #underground #minerals #silvermine #goldmine #exploringabandonedmines
Views: 4219 Mines of the West
The Jackrabbit Mining District: Venturing Into the Jackrabbit Tunnel
 
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Towards the end of our trip, we stopped at the Jackrabbit Tunnel which is located north of Pioche, NV. This mine was very old and very extensive.
What is UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION? What does UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION mean?
 
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What is UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION? What does UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION mean? UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION meaning - UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION definition - UNDERGROUND MINE VENTILATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Underground mine ventilation provides a flow of air to the underground workings of a mine of sufficient volume to dilute and remove dust and noxious gases (typically NOx, SO2, methane, CO2 and CO) and to regulate temperature. The source of these gases are equipment that runs on diesel engines, blasting with explosives, and the orebody itself. The largest component of the operating cost for mine ventilation is electricity to power the ventilation fans, which may account for one third of a typical underground mine's entire electrical power cost. Flow-through ventilation is the main ventilation circuit for the mine. Air enters the mine from surface via a shaft, ventilation raise or adit. The air is distributed through the mine via internal ventilation raises and ramps, and flows are controlled by regulators and permanently mounted ventilation fans. An auxiliary ventilation system takes air from the flow-through system and distributes it to the mine workings via temporarily mounted ventilation fans, venturies and disposable fabric or steel ducting. Auxiliary fan and duct systems may be either forcing systems, where fresh air is pushed into mine headings, or exhausting systems that draw out contaminated air. Sufficient volume of air is required for proper ventilation. A bulk of electric power is required for driving fans. By installing variable speed control air quantity can be optimized hence the power. at every place in the mine where persons are required to work or pass, the air does not contain less than 19% of oxygen or more than 0.5% of carbon dioxide or any noxious gas in quantity likely to affect the health of any person; the percentage of inflammable gas does not exceed 0.75% in the general body of the return air of any ventilating district and 1.25% in any place in the mine. The volume (expressed in cubic feet per minute or cubic meters per second) of air required to ventilate an underground mine is determined by mining engineers based on a wide variety of parameters. In most countries minimum requirements are outlined by law, regulation or standards. However, in some developing countries the mandated ventilation requirement may be insufficient, and the mining company may have to increase the ventilation flow, in particular where ventilation may be required to cool the ambient temperature in a deep hot mine, however auto-compression must also be taken into account. as per CMR 130-2-(i) in every ventilating district, not less than six cubic metres per minute of air per personemployed in the district on the largest shift or not less than 2.5 cubic metres per minute of air per daily tonne output whichever is larger, passes along the last ventilation connection in the district which means the inbye-most gallery in the district along which the air passes. In temperate climates ventilation air may need to be heated during winter months. This will make the working environment more hospitable for miners, and prevent freezing of workings, in particular water pipes. In Arctic mines where the mining horizon is above the permafrost heating may not take place to prevent melting the permafrost. "Cold mines" such as Raglan Mine and Nanisivik Mine are designed to operate below 0°C. the wet bulb temperature in any working place does not exceed 33.5°C and where the wet bulb temperature exceeds 30.5°C arrangements are made to ventilate the same with a current of air moving at a speed of not less than one metre per second.
Views: 4756 The Audiopedia
Old Abandoned Mining Equipment 2016. Haunted Rusty Vehicles
 
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An amazing collection of old mining equipment. Best abandoned places 2016. Urban Exploring abandoned mining equipment. My partner - http://bcd-urbex.com - Best exploring abandoned places
Flooded 1950's Disused Drift Mine(coal) Scotland. Underground Urbex
 
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This was quite a scary explore, probably one of the most dangerous ones although exciting at the same time. The inclined shafts were so amazing, although disapointing that they are eventually flooded. The oxygen levels seem quite low and it's really stuffy inside. I used my sports camera to film, as it was easier to clean the lens as they always steam up in underground sites.
Views: 6390 TeEnZiE
A long narrow adit
 
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We check out a long narrow adit we looked at earlier this year, amazing how narrow this was, in places I had to turn sideways to walk. There is a step down where the tunnel joined another lower tunnel but never quite met at the same level. There will be more from this adit pretty soon, requires a bit of rope work and bolting to get further.
Colimbia #2 Mine - Western Incline Shaft
 
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Press LIKE if you agree to KEEP OUR MINES OPEN. SDME take a third trip to the Columbia #2 Mine in Tecopa, CA exploring the upper sections of the Western incline shaft. This shaft has been burned-out with many dangerous collapsed sections and reaches all the way to the bottom of the mine. We find the first drift tunnel with tracks suspended in mid-air across the shaft. It is a cross-cut tunnel which has been mostly destroyed by fire, making the timbers and ceiling unstable and extremely dangerous to pass. For this reason, we were forced to leave those sections forever unexplored. The Columbia #2 Mine is primarily vertical with 900'+ of known shafts connected with long drift tunnels and stopes. It includes an Eastern incline shaft which leads to the first 200' vertical shaft of many, the burned-out Western incline shaft, which is completely separate until you reach the lower levels of the mine, and an inner 'decline' shaft that leads from the 700' level down to the bottom of the mine at approx 900'. Watch Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auVnb9iDjAE Watch the full ore cart ride: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vx2o3AhLHrA San Diego Mine Enthusiasts - Documenting and preserving our nations mining history for the education of all. "Embraced, not erased!" Don't try this at home!! -HISTORY- The claim for the Columbia #2 (and other nearby mines) was staked in 1877 by William "Professor" & Robert Brown who soon became BCG&SMC (Balance Consolidated Gold & Silver Mining Co.). It was part of the Tecopa Mines group and produced an abundance of Silver and Lead, as well as some Gold, and other profitable minerals such as Dolomite used in brick and glass making.
Views: 401 RetroElectroville
Lower Modi Tunnel Adit #1, Face3
 
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The formation of cavity in the tunnel and the support given to the tunnel.
Views: 7 Fault Lethal
Awesome Color Show In An Abandoned Mine
 
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This abandoned mine had more than one “most” and THAT is impressive because a “most” is, by definition, a rare occurrence. However, this mine was, in fact, the most colorful that I have ever explored and also had timber sets that were under the most severe pressure that I have ever seen before. Pretty impressive to have two “mosts” in one mine, wouldn’t you agree? Now, I’m afraid that many viewers are going to ask me which minerals are creating those splendid colors inside of the mine. The short answer is that I am not a geologist and I don’t know. However, I would normally associate those blues with copper ores. The mineral that looked like chunks of gold scattered between the blues is actually pyrite (also known as “fool’s gold”). Trust me, miners would not leave visible chunks of gold behind! There were, of course, veins of quartz mixed in as well. Known minerals to have been extracted at this site include silver, copper, tungsten, lead, zinc and gold. As with many mines in Nevada, it started out as a silver mine though. I don’t get rattled too easily when exploring abandoned mines, but those shattered timbers toward the end made me very uncomfortable. It was dry in this mine and so those timbers didn’t look like that because they were rotted, but because they seemed to be getting squeezed in from the sides with incredible force. I say that the intense pressure seemed to be coming from the sides rather than the top because the ties for the ore cart rails were snapped in half and it was, primarily, the timbers on the ribs (sides) of the adit that were snapped. The snapped timbers supporting the back (top) looked as if they were broken from being squeezed from both sides rather than from something pressing down on them. I am, frankly, amazed that those timbers have not caved yet as it seemed like just a bat farting back there would create enough of a disturbance to bring that whole section of the mine crashing down. I’m referring to the proverbial straw breaking the camel’s back and that section didn’t seem like that would need much of a straw to finish things. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 7149 TVR Exploring
Exploring The Unsafe Sticky Mesh Mine Tunnel
 
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Spent 4 hours underground exploring this old gold mine tunnel.
Views: 52394 shango066
Hard rock mine
 
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Josephine county oregon
Views: 24 Rod Wagerle
Exploring Italy’s Monte Arsiccio Mine: Part 4 – Doing The Twist
 
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When I was working on the first videos in this series I remembered that this mine became safer after I crossed over the pits. However, when working on this video I was thinking, “Man, this isn’t any better at all!” At one point, you can even see a rock dropping down from the top of the adit. So, yes, this was a pretty bad abandoned mine all of the way through. At least for now, I believe it is the worst (least safe) lode mine that I have been inside. That is somewhat curious to me as all of the other iron mines I have been inside of have been very stable and safe. I suppose it just goes to show how many variations in circumstances can be presented by geology. I thought it was interesting how the path of the LHD twisted down so tightly inside of the mountain to reach the lower levels. LHDs are not exactly small, nimble machines and so I would imagine a pretty skilled operator (or operators) was running the LHD in here. The black water that ended our explorations on this upper adit is similar to the black water that halted my exploration of the lower adit as well. Does this mean the two levels connect somewhere or is it simply because whatever is staining the water is the same in both places? I would love to know the full extent of the workings at this mine, but I have only ever been able to locate a picture (in horribly low resolution) of a crude map of some of the workings. So, that wasn’t a lot of help. Unfortunately, it did reinforce the impression that I missed a small set of workings somewhere. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 5527 TVR Exploring
An Extensive Exploration of One of the Stephens Holding MInes and a Large Stope
 
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This was an exploration of one of the tunnels at the Stephens Holding Mines. This particular tunnel ended at a large stope.
Discovery of an old iron mine adit at Maughold, Isle of Man.
 
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We discovered an opening in the ground, just of Dreemskerry road, Maughold. As you can see, we investigated it, to see what it was. We estimated that it's over 100 metre's inside the rock. This would of being dug out for access to mine into all the iron that's in the ground. Unfortunately there's been a slip in the west adit and backfilled on the east adit. Further up the tunnel there's plenty of water which is seeping in from the surrounding ground. We estimated that the adit would be as deep as 200metre's below the road and field. We aproached the end and again a slip of rock and material had blocked our way. Alas we were pretty deflated to find a blockage, but Stevie had an idea to maybe dig it out. Lood, Stevie and myself had a mini-adventure today, but we were hoping for " The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" experience...
Views: 1238 Arnie Crellin
Driving an Adit in Indonesia Using Traditional Tools
 
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Although this is not a video from Mexico the video shows that traditionally the same mining techniques were widely used throughout the world. This video shows modern day, traditional miners driving an adit by hand into a mountainside through hard rock using only basic hand tools. At the time of the video the adit length was about 40 meters so there was still another 35 meters to go to reach their 75 meter target. By hand through this hard rock two shifts of four people were able to complete the 75 meter adit in about one year.
Views: 328 MxMining
HUGE LABYRINTH OF WAR TUNNELS - Shorts Brother Underground WW2 Shadow Factory - Part 2
 
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PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WAS FILMED MONTHS AGO - ACCESS TO THE SITE IS NOW STRICLTY UNDER LOCK AND KEY! After a long time, we have finally managed to film the well-known "Shorts Brothers Tunnels". The sheer size of this place cannot be accurately described. We visited two nights in a row and still didn’t walk down every tunnel. We hope you enjoy the second part of the story. Some history on the place: On 23rd September 1941 Shorts Brothers contacted the Ministry of Aircraft Production regarding their seaplane works at Rochester seeking authority to build a new underground works in tunnels excavated under chalk cliffs behind their existing MAP extension factory on the south bank of the River Medway. Space was urgently required for 75 new machine tools as their works were full to capacity. The tunnels were intended to create 12,000 square feet of workshop space at a cost of £20,000 which, it was acknowledged was somewhat higher than a new surface building but stress was lid upon the vulnerability of the Medway estuary. The project was given the go ahead and the tunnels were excavated consisting of two parallel tunnels, each one hundred metres in length, these were linked by four 75 metre long adits to the cliff face at the rear of the factory. The tunnels were for the most part cut from chalk and brick lined (one of the adits was unlined). There were also two 45 degree ventilation shafts extending to the surface. At the eastern end of the tunnels the company built an extensive network of air raid shelter tunnels again consisting of two parallel drives running parallel with the cliff face, each was three hundred yards in length connected by 14 crosscuts. These were connected to the Shorts Factory tunnels by a single tunnel 400 metres in length and by 9 adits of varying lengths out to the cliff face. There were three vertical ventilation shafts to the surface which were also fitted with ladders for emergency escape. To continue reading about this place, please visit: http://www.subbrit.org.uk/rsg/sites/r/rochester/ Urbex Participants: SubExploration SubEx - 13ADG3R Boz - https://www.instagram.com/boz_ue/ Exploring with Adams - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPemBc-38G3XcIC0avGPjag Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/subexploration Twitter - http://twitter.com/subexploration Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100019232554455 Music: Intro: Finger Music - Ultra https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWzgzBJwZrM Photo Music: Disfigure - Blank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ZsBPK656s
Views: 3960 Sub Exploration
Golden veins in Kremnica's underground
 
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Adit Andrej in Kremnica, Ludovika shaft... gold!!!
Views: 340 medovysen.sk
Abandoned Explore : Sandsend & Kettleness Railway Tunnels, Whitby, UK + Alm Quarries
 
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In this extra long edition, we we taking a complete walk through the Kettleness and Sandsend railway tunnels, outside of Whitby in the UK. We will also be looking at the history of some of the local Alm quarries in the area :o)
Views: 82149 RGVX
The Uncle Dan Mine- Mystery mine
 
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A visit to Uncle Dan on a cold and windy February day. At the time of the visit this mine was very much a mystery to me as to where the actual mine was. Please excuse the wind noise as the new Rode mic and dead cat (wind shield) did not perform real well. Also excuse me carrying around part of a ritz cracker for the first part of the video... Hope you enjoy. https://www.patreon.com/HamHomestead Music from: Epidemicsound.com www.facebook.com/hamhomestead Email: [email protected]
Views: 3595 Ham Homestead
Vertical Shaft at Donohoe Mine (Sealed)
 
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Topographic maps show a vertical shaft on the opposite side of the road from the Donohoe Mine adit. Not much is left of the site -- the shaft has been filled in and sealed. A rusted water tank high up on the hill is all that remains as well as several rusted pipes running up and down the hill towards the site where the vertical shaft would've plunged deep into the hillside.
What Is Shaft Sinking?
 
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It is also called shaft construction or mining 29 aug 2014in tunnels and underground excavations sinking drilling. Wikipedia wiki shaft_mining "imx0m" url? Q webcache. Shaft mining or shaft sinking is excavating a vertical near tunnel from the top down, where there initially no access to bottom. Shaft mining wikipediashaft sinking shaft 1 slideshareshaft how a is sunk ! pro bergbau. Working in some of the most extreme conditions and remote locations on earth 26 may 2016 sinking work excavating a shaft. Topic shaft sinking mining weeklyshaft history byrnecutfrontier kemper frontier constructors. Shaft sinking and drilling thyssen schachtbau gmbharticle about shaft by the free dictionary. Shaft mining wikipedia. Excavation from the surface of an opening in earth. How this is done will be explained here in a few 28 mar 2017 conventional mine shaft sinking methods involve the performance of cycle different operations drilling and blasting, removal smoke sinking, an important operation mining for reaching working mineral deposits situated at depth below surface, whenever topography 13 jul 2012 sinkingfinal surface facilities. The byrnecut group and associated entities have successfully completed the following shaft sinking projects what is conventional sinking? Conventional a drill blast excavation method that requires no restrictions on depth or diameter. Dmc), will use the herrenknecht shaft boring roadheader. Googleusercontent search. Whether it's using conventional drill and the shaft sinking drilling division at thyssen schachtbau gmbh is an important part of our globally based internationally active corporation find out information about. The following sections describe the activities, key features and constraints of sirius's shaft sinking contractor dmc mining services ltd. Shafts, which are generally vertical, usually distinguished by natasha odendaal 30th september 2016 emerging miner wesizwe platinum concluded an amicable agreement with appointed shaft sinking contractor 21st april 2017 mine and mining services company redpath south africa has entered into alliance multidisciplinary construction 11 oct from the remote highlands of papua to technically challenging urban landscapes hong kong, our turnkey solution for projects history. Sbr) to construct the main shafts 30 mar 2016 thyssen mining has been sinking worldwide for over 100 years. Shaft mining wikipedia en. Mine shaft sinking methods 911 metallurgistshaft sinkingthyssen mining. When the top of excavation is ground surface, it referred to as a shaft; underground, called winze or sub shaft redpath recognized throughout industry global leader in sinking. Topic shaft sinking engineering news. Mining downward, generally from the surface, although occasionally an underground chamber, is called shaft sinking a shaft's ! before miners or materials can be brought underground, shafts have to prepared. Shaft sinking it may be described as an excavation of vertical or inclined opening from surface for conveyance men, materials, ventilation, pumping water, in addition to hoisting ore and waste rock.
Views: 37 E Answers